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Thread: Crash Chronicles (Crashes and Near Misses)

  1. #121
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Weaving thoughts

    I think there is another advantage to using THE WEAVE, apart from making yourself more visible. You look dangerous! "Martha, I think that damn squid is drunk!" If drivers not only see you but also see you as a threat, chances are they will try to protect themselves - which of course protects you.

    But the usual caveat - "Nothing works 100%" - still applies. Some people are so engrossed in everything but driving that they wouldn't see a fluorescent orange moose standing sideways in their lane with flashing lights from antlers to tail. Still, I believe a white helmet, brighter riding gear, extra lighting, and the SMIDSY weave result in far fewer times where you have to take serious evasive action. And that is a good thing.

    One further advantage of THE WEAVE (as opposed to brighter gear and more lights) is that you have to PAY ATTENTION to use it. If you use the weave, it is because you have noticed a possible problem well before it becomes an immediate problem. I believe paying serious attention to the riding environment and anticipating possible problems is the surest way to arrive at your destination with body and bike intact. Nothing guaranteed, of course. But it's always good to up the odds in your favor.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  2. #122
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Why any motorcyclist would wear a black helmet, and black jacket, is beyond me. A white helmet is so much more visible. As far as the SMIDSY weave goes, what if you are weaving towards the car as he pulls out?

    Another big factor in bike and car wrecks is obstructed vision: a motorist can't possible see you because her vision is blocked, but she decides to go anyway. The SMIDSY weave won't help with that situation; you have to anticipate those and take defensive action based on the situation, that obstructed vision is in effect.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  3. #123
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    The weave is not a magic bullet that will protect you from those who don't see you. Don't think of it that way. It is a tool that may help with visibility in some situations.

    When properly performed you do not weave past the car for exactly the reason mentioned... what happens if the car pulls out anyway. The weave is performed before getting to the waiting car in the hope that it will assist that driver recognize your presense. You still have to be ready for anything. As for the the blocked vision comment... if you can see them (look them in the eyes) they can see you. If you can't see them then you won't be doing the weave. What would be the point.

    A friend uses another technique... he waves at the driver in cars waiting at cross streets as if he knows them. It seems to work in that I've seen cars start to move then stop as the driver tries to figure out who just waved at them.

  4. #124
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    When to use the "SMIDSY" weave

    I agree completely that it just another "tool" for alerting other drivers to our presence. (Nobody else thought looking drunk and dangerous was also a good thing?) I am certainly not an expert in using this tool and look forward to other suggestions. Here is how I have used it:

    1. Oncoming traffic with more than one car on a two-lane road: When I think it possible someone will make an un-safe pass because they don't see me in the left wheel track, I swerve to the right so I can see the cars, and hopefully they see me. Maybe do it twice. And I'm thinking of the possibility of using the right paved shoulder if the message didn't communicate. That emergency exit from the road hasn't happened yet.

    2. Side streets at right angles to "my highway." Try to do the weave as soon as I see the street, even if I don't see a car. There are lots of reasons even an attentive motorist approaching that intersection would not see my bike if I just rode straight down the left wheel track. Good point though by another poster - after you do your warning swerves, have that bike upright and be able to brake in time if you still were not seen.

    I have never used "the Swerve" in towns and look forward to the advice on the situations where it is advisable.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  5. #125
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    I guess I do it in my routine w/out much thought. Yesterday, I noticed I do it in rural and metro areas about the same. Any sniper ( drivers entering roadway from either side) that I consider a threat may get a mild dip of the bars...not a dodge a pothole exaggerated weave, just a mild push on bars to move the lighted target of my oncoming bike. I dip towards the target first to move my nose their way.

    I also looked in mirror ( when I actually was out front) at various distances and could not 100% discern what color my WingWoman's helmet color was unless she was really close. It has some white in it, but not white. You CAN see the PIAA & Motolights however


    As mentioned, it's just one more way to have a happy ending to a ride. I know many consider the Hurt Report the end all...data from 1976-77 and published in 1981 is not totally relevant today. Don't get me wrong...it was the most up to date study...then. Motorcycles and gear has evolved some since then. The conclusions may not have changed...folks do not see bikes. But that's my take...not knocking what you go with.

    A quote from a site:

    The National Agenda for Motorcycle Safety study cited a broad list of changes that have occurred that affect the current validity of the Hurt Report, broken into four categories:

    Motorcycle Engineering Changes
    User Population Changes
    Automobile Engineering Changes
    Roadway Environmental Changes

    Hurt argues that the age of the study does not necessarily invalidate all its findings or even its core findings; rather, it highlights the need for current work to affirm or update the current state of motorcycle safety:
    "The more time goes by, the less things look different. Riders today have the same sort of accidents as riders in the 1970s, except that today they crash much more expensive bikes."
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  6. #126
    Registered User AKsuited's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    Hurt argues that the age of the study does not necessarily invalidate all its findings or even its core findings; rather, it highlights the need for current work to affirm or update the current state of motorcycle safety:
    "The more time goes by, the less things look different. Riders today have the same sort of accidents as riders in the 1970s, except that today they crash much more expensive bikes."
    The thing that stands out in my mind when looking at motorcycle safety research is how well the later studies agree with the Hurt Report. The studies basically all arrive at the same conclusions.

    Here's one: http://www.bmj.com/content/328/7444/857

    After adjustment for potential confounders, drivers wearing any reflective or fluorescent clothing had a 37% lower risk (multivariate odds ratio 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.42 to 0.94) than other drivers. Compared with wearing a black helmet, use of a white helmet was associated with a 24% lower risk

    There is also the MAIDS study from Europe: http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/str...ccident_study/

    In 70 percent of the two-vehicle crashes, the other driver failed to "perceive" the two-wheeler, causing the authors to classify this as a primary accident cause.

    Also:

    As in the Hurt Report, which studied motorcycle crashes in America a quarter-century ago, riders did a poor job when they had to stop and/or turn in a moment of panic. In almost three-fourths of the crashes, the rider attempted some pre-impact avoidance maneuver, and about one third of those lost control of the motorcycle as a result.

    The MAIDS Report also finds that obstructed vision is a major cause of motorcycle/car collisions.

    Harry
    2003 R1150RT - Silver

  7. #127
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    New Bike Near Miss......

    As a point of reference I live in Montana and have been riding for thirty years, fifteen of those on Beemers.
    Last Saturday I picked up a new 800 GS adventure in California and had a great ride down the coast (story for another thread).

    To the point, I arrived in Tucson this past Thursday to enjoy the sun and store my bike for a month or so before heading north.
    As I was riding through town (something I hate is city riding) I came upon a funeral procession of cars and motorcycle police escorts.
    One of the moto cops had traffic stopped and I was at the front of the line, when all of the funeral cars had passed he mounted his harley and waved us on. So I twisted the throttle and (here's where I made a mistake) I went in front of the motor cop but in the left lane and well behind the procession of cars. Next thing I see and hear is his siren and lights about five feet off my rear wheel, so I stopped. He pulled up next to me and screamed "pull over and stay behind me" and then he shot off. At this point heavy traffic shot past me as pulled away from the curb.

    I guess overall, the lesson learned is to give these guys a WIDE berth, I never new they escorted funerals?

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