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Thread: Tire Plugger gets a D-

  1. #1
    Registered User redclfco's Avatar
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    Cool Tire Plugger gets a c-

    Imagine my delight when I discovered my tire pressure heading down and losing at 21 lbs (year old Metzeler Tourance, Rear) in my garage versus miles from home! The tire was toast, and due to be replaced, so I saw this as a wonderful opportunity to test this new fangled tire plugger.

    So I fired up the air, dug out my tire plugger, which I have faithfully carried in the tool kit for a couple of years, along with the traditional messy greased rope plugger.

    The fault of the leak was 6 penny stainless steel ring shank picked up somewhere yesterday as my wife and I rode up the road on the Minnesota side of the Mississippi North to our home..It was imbedded to the shank, and the soap bubbles confirmed the slow leak, and I pulled it out with the needle nose, resulting in the remaining feeble air to escape in seconds....

    The first sign of trouble was to get the injector into the tire- without any pressure to keep the tire solid, it was IMPOSSIBLE to get it in, even after reaming out the hole, greasing the injector, so I partially inflated the tire, but still took way too much effort to get the thingy in the tire...Try to imagine doing this on a dark road, only C02 canisters your only source of air...you would not of got it done, I am afraid! This sucks!

    Once the injector was inserted per instructions the product worked as intended, crank on the allen wrench until the bulbous little head of the plug was inserted through the tire wall, the gently withdraw the injector...and then slice the head of the plug level with the tire..Very pretty...One slight problem...The sucker leaked, and on a subsequent try with another one to be sure I performed the install correctly, it also leaked, not full bore "hsssss", but way more then it should of. I also found very little pressure was needed to push the plug right into the tire after it was installed; it appeared not to be seated; so much for no glue!

    Long story short, I shoved BOTH of these failed plugs inside, took one try with my old fashion plugger my dad gave me 20 years ago (the greased rope 20+ years old) and it held on the first try, tire now deflated, no effort, and no work; I then sliced it level, and have been riding errands to town 20+ miles today with nary a lb. of loss of air.

    OBVIOUSLY I am getting a new tire tomorrow, and OBVIOUSLY I am taking it easy here on this fix, but I think, my tire plugger will now hit the bottom drawer in the tool box for ever more...it really sucked, it failed, it does not work as advertised for me...Now as usual, somebody on this forum is bound to come back here that I did it wrong, they have used it 20 times in a row and rode another 500 miles to their mothers house and back, and all I got to say to you is bully for you...It did not work for me, and thatÔÇÖs all I got to say..
    Last edited by redclfco; 09-22-2008 at 09:07 PM. Reason: spelin

  2. #2
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    Thumbs up Good Info

    I for one am glad you posted this. I don't have a plugging kit yet and will be careful on what I choose now. Thanks for the insight.http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/images/icons/icon14.gif

  3. #3
    How cold was it? shoeman's Avatar
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    I haven't found a plugger that works dry- I use Monkey grip glue from Wally World. It has held for months.
    Jim Johnson, OP Kansas
    Marcus Aurelius: "The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane."

  4. #4
    RK Ryder
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    Red, I am interested in which brand product did not work for you as I did pickup a Dyna Tire Plugger kit last winter and would be interested if we have the same product. I have not had need to use mine yet but would hate to be out on the road and have the same experience that you had in your garage.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  5. #5
    wsteinborn
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    I have used the Stop N Go mushroom plugger three times.

    The first time I did not get it all the way in so one edge of the mushroom curled unter. It was good enought to get me home (60+ miles) and the next day was only down 3-4 pounds, so I pumped it up and rode to get a new tire.

    The other 3 times I did much better. In fact the last time was on a friends bike and he is still riding that tire.

    I agree - you need an air pump. Those CO2 cartridges are limited and useless if you have to feep topping off the tire over the next day or two.

  6. #6
    Registered User redclfco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    Red, I am interested in which brand product did not work for you as I did pickup a Dyna Tire Plugger kit last winter and would be interested if we have the same product. I have not had need to use mine yet but would hate to be out on the road and have the same experience that you had in your garage.
    The "Stop and Go" "tire plugger". The directions state no glue, but if I had another go at it, I would try glue to see if it works. I have a leaky tire in the JD lawn tractor; will try with glue to see if it performs better.

    More than the slow leak that followed the repair, what really got my goat is the extreme effort it took to get the plug in in the first place! I kept imagining what it would be like kneeling in a rain puddle in the dark trying to stick the applicator in; that;s the part that gave it a minus (- )in the D! If I would of just left the nail in and rode it, the leak would of been slower, so go figure!

  7. #7
    Bob
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    Red,

    On the bright side, you found out in the garage.
    Sorry about youir misfortune, but thanks for the feedback. I think I'll stick with my old sticky rope repair kit, I've even used it to patch flats on other people's trucks.

    Bob

  8. #8
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I need some clarification. I'm confused.

    My Stop and Go has a handle with a needle tip that screws into the insertion tube. Once the needle and tube tip are inserted through the tread section the handle is removed, the plug is stuck in the inserter which is then screwed onto the insertion tube. Then the plug is forced into the tire. That needle tip on the handle is as sharply pointed as a machinist's scribe or scratch awl. I could stick it into a tire with or without a hole in the tire the first place.

    Is your kit different?

    I have had good luck installing Stop & Go plugs. I've had some cut by the steel belts though since the plugs are as soft as they are.

    I've had more trouble inserting, but better luck sealing with old fashioned gummy worm type plug strings marketed as suitable for steel belted radial tires.

    What I carry in the bikes is the gummy worms - reddish brown or black.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  9. #9
    Registered User redclfco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    I need some clarification. I'm confused.

    My Stop and Go has a handle with a needle tip that screws into the insertion tube. Once the needle and tube tip are inserted through the tread section the handle is removed, the plug is stuck in the inserter which is then screwed onto the insertion tube. Then the plug is forced into the tire. That needle tip on the handle is as sharply pointed as a machinist's scribe or scratch awl. I could stick it into a tire with or without a hole in the tire the first place.

    Is your kit different?

    I have had good luck installing Stop & Go plugs. I've had some cut by the steel belts though since the plugs are as soft as they are.

    I've had more trouble inserting, but better luck sealing with old fashioned gummy worm type plug strings marketed as suitable for steel belted radial tires.

    What I carry in the bikes is the gummy worms - reddish brown or black.
    Paul,

    There is an awl in the kit with a permanent handle, and I see now should be used to "head up" getting the insertion tube into the tire, which I am sure makes it an easier go than I had today. I watched a guy at West Bend national insert the exact thing on a hunk of tire, and made it look easy as pie using just the configuration of the tool; but in my case, inserting this thing on a "live" deflated tire was extremely difficult. It was better after being partially inflated, but not worth the hassle, in my opinion.

    I too will only carry my gummy worms; I know they work, I know the level of difficulty, and way less parts; the expense is past tense.
    Red
    Last edited by redclfco; 09-22-2008 at 12:37 AM.

  10. #10
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    Wally-mart type stores sell a "gummy-rope" type tire plug kit fer less than $20 that & a small 12v compressor is to my mind "the hot set up"
    ps I've had less than adequate results from stop n go

  11. #11
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    All holes are not created equally

    During major construction at a hospital I worked at in the past I had multiple punctures in a short period of time because of construction debris. I repaired leaks using both methods and replaced both front (x2) and back tires at the hospitals expense in the process. In my experience, how effective the tire plugger is depends on the hole in the tire.

    Straight through punctures are easily and effectively repaired by my stop and go tire plugger. I have ridden miles and miles after fixing this type of puncture with a mushroom style tire plugger.

    Punctures where the puncture is a glancing one and the object cuts the inside of the tire forming a slash the plug would leak. I could plug them and they would not hold the 12 miles back to my home.

    In either case I could not tell the difference between the two types of punctures until I took the tire off and inspected it from the inside.

    Like any tool the Stop and Go Tire Plugger when you use it for the job it was designed for.

  12. #12
    R1200RT Artiee's Avatar
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    I too have the Stop-n-Go plugger. I practiced a couple of times on an old (unmounted) tire. It only took about 15 minutes to break open the kit and have the plug seated and trimmed. I'm not sure why you may have had trouble.

    I've been fortunate that I've not needed it on the road.

    In addition, I also carry a can of presserized tire sealant. If I ever need to use a plug, this will be followed with the sealant.

  13. #13
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    I don't want to seem to have bad-mouthed the Stop and Go kit. I have been told (source unremembered) that Stop and Go has changed the rubber composition to make the plugs less prone to cutting by steel belts. Also - that reaming the hole to bend the steel tips back is important.

    I still prefer the gummy worms because I've had better luck with them. But using the needle tip makes the S&G inserter go into the tire very easily - which was the point of my original post - since getting the tube in the tire was the problem.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  14. #14
    Registered User redclfco's Avatar
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    I have fixed my tire today, and guess what? You already know; the steel belt had clearly compromised the plugs in both plugs that I had pushed through into the tire when they failed to work. Glad to know they took steps to replace the plugs with a better product. Now I just wish somebody would go to the trouble of contacting me to give me a handfull of new plugs, but my guess is I am SOL here. Plus, I think I'll stick to what I know works best. Gummy worms. Plus, maybe they are the same? who knows...sort of like FD failure? haha

  15. #15
    Registered User R100RS's Avatar
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    I've used the Stop N Go twice on cage tires. The first time, it worked great and the tire went over a 1000 miles without problems. The second time, the puncture was on the edge of the tread and the end of the first plug broke when I tried pulling it to set it all the way in. It still had a slow leak. Due to the location of the puncture (at the junction of tread and sidewall), I ended up replacing the tire completely. I carry the Stop N Go on the motorcycle.
    -Mike

    '02 R1150R
    '88 R100RS

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