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Thread: Food Vendors @ the 2011 Rally

  1. #46
    High & Dry statdawg's Avatar
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    This place is 20 miles down stream of the Rally site and its on the east side of the Susquehanna River.

    http://www.skeetersbbq.com/

    While in town check out the historic Edison Hotel in Sunbury, they have nice waffles.
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  2. #47
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Shoo fly is brown, which is a shade of yellow.

    That hot lettuce dressing recipe was originally served on young dandelion greens. Later, the more affluent devotees, started using it on endive. You really need something with a bit of bitterness to balance the sweetness of the dressing.

    Did the MIL make steamed dumplings on top of the sauerkraut and pork loin?
    Shoo fly pie is the darkest yellow I ever saw.

    The hot lettuce dressing works on any leafy greens, but it happens that my wife doesn't like most of the bitter greens, so when she makes it, it's with lettuce or spinach. I've made it with chard, but what do I know? I'm from a Jewish family in Los Angeles. That's where the borscht comes from. And pierogies and blintzes and chopped liver and... kishke. But that's for another time.
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  3. #48
    Steve rockbottom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Statdawg View Post
    This place is 20 miles down stream of the Rally site and its on the east side of the Susquehanna River.

    http://www.skeetersbbq.com/

    While in town check out the historic Edison Hotel in Sunbury, they have nice waffles.
    I've been there 2 or 3 times. It's OK. But I'm a South Carolinian so my BBQ standards are high.

  4. #49
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Real PA Pot pie? Crust baked on top or cut in strips and stewed with the meat and veggies? You pick the wrong one and we'll know you're a poser!


    Cabbage rolls and Pierogi, that qualifies as ethnic food in PA Dutch country. Do you eat that with chopsticks?
    Real pot pie does not have crust! Hubby is from western PA. I'm relativly new to the coal cracker food but have become quite the fan. Too tired after my outing to Target today to hit the grocery store but I'll be cooking tomorrow.

  5. #50
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockbottom View Post
    They even flashed Denny's Beer Barrel Pub, which is one of my ride-to-eat places when I'm heading for the Elk Country.
    We were just talking about that earlier. I've seen it on the food network and the travel channel like 8 times this week. (nothing else to do but surf the tv while I'm recovering from some surgery.) I've been there and it's first on the list for a spring time overnight ride.

  6. #51
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newstar View Post
    Real pot pie does not have crust!
    Try explaining that to the rest of the world
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  7. #52
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi View Post
    Shoo fly pie is the darkest yellow I ever saw.

    The hot lettuce dressing works on any leafy greens, but it happens that my wife doesn't like most of the bitter greens, so when she makes it, it's with lettuce or spinach. I've made it with chard, but what do I know? I'm from a Jewish family in Los Angeles. That's where the borscht comes from. And pierogies and blintzes and chopped liver and... kishke. But that's for another time.
    On your side of the family did you ever eat sulze or sous?
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  8. #53
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    On your side of the family did you ever eat sulze or sous?
    No, never heard of either, actually. Wikipedia says that S??lze is the German equivalent of head cheese... The closest we ever got something like that was homemade gefillte fish.

    I did have one of those quintessential tourist experiences in L??beck, Germany, a number of years ago. Went into a local restaurant; the daily special on the blackboard was Sauerfleisch. I didn't know what it was, but I guessed it might be something like Sauerbraten, so I thought I'd try it. The waitress brought an empty plate to my table and a glass jar. It was filled with a cloudy substance and there was a dark gray object in the middle. It was cold. It turned out to be a cutlet preserved in aspic.

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  9. #54
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarrylRi View Post
    No, never heard of either, actually. Wikipedia says that S??lze is the German equivalent of head cheese... The closest we ever got something like that was homemade gefillte fish.

    I did have one of those quintessential tourist experiences in L??beck, Germany, a number of years ago. Went into a local restaurant; the daily special on the blackboard was Sauerfleisch. I didn't know what it was, but I guessed it might be something like Sauerbraten, so I thought I'd try it. The waitress brought an empty plate to my table and a glass jar. It was filled with a cloudy substance and there was a dark gray object in the middle. It was cold. It turned out to be a cutlet preserved in aspic.

    "It's good, though." --Utah Phillips
    The Tor in Lubeck is really nice. I'll bet you ate at the Schiffergesellschaft with the ship model hanging from the ceiling? The iron curtain used to be just east of the city.

    Sauerfleish is a beef variation on the theme of sous. The PA Ducth used to pickle and gel beef heart and tongue in that manner.
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  10. #55
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    On your side of the family did you ever eat sulze or sous?
    Ugh! My grandfather used to love souse. Just the look skived me. Jello is supposed to come in fruity flavors, with no animal parts of any kind!

  11. #56
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    The Tor in Lubeck is really nice. I'll bet you ate at the Schiffergesellschaft with the ship model hanging from the ceiling? The iron curtain used to be just east of the city.

    Sauerfleish is a beef variation on the theme of sous. The PA Ducth used to pickle and gel beef heart and tongue in that manner.
    The Basque restaurants out this way tend to have picked beef tongue, sliced thin. I've always liked it anyway, but pickled was a nice variant.

    Luebeck is a beautiful town. The Tor used to be on some big D-mark note, I recall. (People here complain how PC things have gotten, but the Euro notes all have doorways and bridges depicted that don't actually exist, so no one will feel slighted or left out.) I should try to spend a couple days there and see it again. I recall the market square was quite pretty. But I have no idea what restaurant I went into, just that it was a short walk from the Gasthof I stayed at.
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  12. #57
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newstar View Post
    Ugh! My grandfather used to love souse. Just the look skived me. Jello is supposed to come in fruity flavors, with no animal parts of any kind!
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  13. #58
    Dum vivimus vivamus ted's Avatar
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    I'm looking forward to Coney Dogs!
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  14. #59
    Registered User 36654's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newstar View Post
    Ugh! My grandfather used to love souse. Just the look skived me. Jello is supposed to come in fruity flavors, with no animal parts of any kind!
    Ahhhh.....the gelatin in Jello is collagen which is rendered from animal bones and skins.
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  15. #60
    Novice Adventurer Newstar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 36654 View Post
    Ahhhh.....the gelatin in Jello is collagen which is rendered from animal bones and skins.
    Yeah but it's sweet and fruity and I can't read the box!

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