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Thread: Proper technique for fuel line clamps

  1. #1
    Registered User bluegrasspicker's Avatar
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    Proper technique for fuel line clamps

    My fuel lines were leaking a bit between the line and the clamp on my quick disconnects. As soon as it gets warm enough, I am going to replace the lines and clamps. ( R1150RT)

    What is the proper technique for tightening the clamps?

    How close to the end of the hose should the clamp be?
    How do I know when the clamp is tight enough, or too tight?

  2. #2
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    The clamp should be aboat midpoint in the male fitting inserted into the hose.

    I snug them up until I can see the hose deform slightly. Beyond that is overkill.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  3. #3
    Daily Rider jurgen's Avatar
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    I assume that you have the OEM clamps made by Swiss mfg. Oetiker.
    There was a recall years ago where these clamps came loose and leaked. You can simply re-tighten them and all will be well.
    They sell a special tool which is essentially a front cutter with dulled edges.
    See here:
    http://chadstoolbox.com/1098oetikerclamppliers.aspx
    I use a regular (sharp) front cutter (no worries, you won't be able to cut the clamp). This worked well to tighten the clamps to the point where they no longer leak.
    I also have been sucessful prying the clamps open with small screwdrivers, changing out the quick disconnects for steel ones (Beemerboneyard carries them), then tightening the old clamps back up with the cutters.
    J?rgen
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  4. #4
    Registered User bluegrasspicker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    The clamp should be aboat midpoint in the male fitting inserted into the hose.

    I snug them up until I can see the hose deform slightly. Beyond that is overkill.
    Sounds good Paul, thanks for the advice.
    Tom

  5. #5
    Registered User bluegrasspicker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jurgen View Post
    I assume that you have the OEM clamps made by Swiss mfg. Oetiker. .
    Thanks for the reply. I took those off when I put on the quick disconnects.
    The clamps I'll be putting on are the solid screw type that came with the fuel line replacement kit from beemerboneyard.

  6. #6
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    It may be just my opinion, but it seems to me the Oetiker clamps save BMW a little time in the original assembly in the factory but are a maintenance headache thereafter unless you have a supply of new ones and a somewhat proper tool. Prying off and then rebending to use them again is a kludge. I don't go out of my way to replace them all but I do replace them any time I have need to remove or loosen one. And I don't replace them with Oetiker clamps. Good for manufacturing doesn't always equate to good for maintenance.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  7. #7
    Nickname: Droid
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    The caution with any form of hose clamp, is over tightening the clamp in an area close to a step or barb on the stub the hose passes over, or if the clamp is placed right where the hose bends. If over-tight, the stress on the hose inner tube can actually cause a cut or tear in the inner tube of the hose. If this happens, the liquid may get between the inner tube and outer cover, which causes "wetting" on the hose cover or possibly hose cover blisters.

  8. #8
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    Fuel line type

    Greetings, All - NOT to hi-jack the thread, but this seems legit. . .

    One of my several winter projects is the installation of quick-disconnects on the fuel lines of my '94 RS -- Pretty sure these are the ORIGINAL lines, and I've bought the beemerboneyard hose clamps.

    Q: Is there some kind of certified Teutonic fuel line needed???? Or, will any AutoZone "pressure" fuel line (of appropriate diameter) work???

    This info is probably skillfully hidden behind the impenetrable firewall of the Search Engine on this site -- too bad that same technology wasn't used by the government; Wikileaks wouldn't have stood a chance. . .

    Thanks (again) for all the help available on this site.

    Paul - the information you gave on lubing the splines correctly probably saved my a_ _, or maybe just the clutch. . .but THANKS for the detailed tip - I bet a lot of techs have goofed this one over the years, and -for sure- a lot of semi-skilled (emphasis on "semi") shadetree guys have done it wrong, and wondered why the clutch slipped.

    We soldier on.

    Walking Eagle

  9. #9
    Nickname: Droid
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    If the hose is rated as fuel hose, and is rated for the pressure of the fuel injection system then it should be fine. Must likely it will have a Nitrile inner tube which should work ok for the temperature ranges on a bike. But if possible, check the temperature rating of the hose if available.

    Without knowing more specifics on the hose I can't say how long it would last. It must also be a hose that is UV stable (Ultraviolet resistant) because on a bike the hose will be directly exposed to sunlight more so than on a car under the hood. A hose that is not UV stable WILL harden and crack simply due to direct sun exposure.

    I used to work for Dayco before Parker, and Dayco made most of the hose commonly found at auto parts retailers, like NAPA and Auto Zone. Here is a link to more details on injection fuel hose:

    http://www.daycoproducts.com/daycowe...c!OpenDocument

  10. #10
    Day Dreaming ... happy wanderer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ANDYVH View Post
    If the hose is rated as fuel hose, and is rated for the pressure of the fuel injection system then it should be fine. Must likely it will have a Nitrile inner tube which should work ok for the temperature ranges on a bike. But if possible, check the temperature rating of the hose if available.

    Without knowing more specifics on the hose I can't say how long it would last. It must also be a hose that is UV stable (Ultraviolet resistant) because on a bike the hose will be directly exposed to sunlight more so than on a car under the hood. A hose that is not UV stable WILL harden and crack simply due to direct sun exposure.

    I used to work for Dayco before Parker, and Dayco made most of the hose commonly found at auto parts retailers, like NAPA and Auto Zone. Here is a link to more details on injection fuel hose:

    http://www.daycoproducts.com/daycowe...c!OpenDocument
    Is the hose mentioned in this link UV stable?
    MJM - BeeCeeBeemers Motorcycle Club Vancouver B.C.
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  11. #11
    Scottish Transplant Picinisco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrharve@tularosa.net View Post
    One of my several winter projects is the installation of quick-disconnects on the fuel lines of my '94 RS --
    Is there some kind of certified Teutonic fuel line needed???? Or, will any AutoZone "pressure" fuel line (of appropriate diameter) work???
    Just did that too and installed an external filter. One of the the tutorials on replacing the filter stated "get 6 feet of fuel injection rated line". I bought mine from NAPA. Rated at 80psi. However it was $8.50 a foot. So I opted for 3 feet with the intention of buying any extra that I would need in 1 foot increments. Happily 3 feet was enough. I am a cheap bastard.
    2004 R1150GS
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picinisco View Post
    Just did that too and installed an external filter. One of the the tutorials on replacing the filter stated "get 6 feet of fuel injection rated line". I bought mine from NAPA. Rated at 80psi. However it was $8.50 a foot. So I opted for 3 feet with the intention of buying any extra that I would need in 1 foot increments. Happily 3 feet was enough. I am a cheap bastard.
    You may well be a cheap ba$tard, but NOT buying 2 times what you need does not make you so.

    Fuel injection rated hose is expensive.

    Mark

  13. #13
    Nickname: Droid
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    Can't say with absolute certainty, but Parker hoses, Dayco hoses, Aerquip, Gates, Weatherhead, the big names in hoses almost all make the hose materials UV stable. Stick wiht the big names brands for good quality.

    I would not depend on that if the hose came from some unknown off-shore supplier from China, Korea, India, Malaysia, and the many other countries that produce a variety of hoses. Cheap hose is just that, cheap, and not all hose is created equal by any measure, even those built to the same SAE specs.

  14. #14
    Registered User beemermyke's Avatar
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    I remember reading that fuel line rated for fuel injection systems is fine if it's an external line (outside the tank). However, if replacing any line inside the tank, it has to be rated as "submersible" to prevent the breakdown of the outer material. Anyone else care to verity this? I Googled it, and found one of many links:

    http://www.frsport.com/Gates-27093-5...0_p_15937.html

    BTW, both types of line can usually be purchased at your local NAPA dealer.
    Motorcycling is my passion because golf is far too dangerous!
    2004 R1150RS, forming a search committee to add another.

  15. #15
    Scottish Transplant Picinisco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beemermyke View Post
    I remember reading that fuel line rated for fuel injection systems is fine if it's an external line (outside the tank). However, if replacing any line inside the tank, it has to be rated as "submersible" to prevent the breakdown of the outer material.
    To bypass the fuel filter inside the tank you only need 10" so at $20/foot you would not break the bank unless you only have $19 in the bank. I did not check if the hose I bought from NAPA was submersible but it certainly is submersed now.
    2004 R1150GS
    AMA - BMWMOA - BMWRSOC - AZBEEMERS
    Gilbert, Arizona

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