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Thread: New Member and Camping Q's

  1. #46
    Low speed, high drag
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    Thumbs up

    Blairbear mentioned walking around the rallies and checking out what others are using. I agree wholeheartedly. Most of us made our gear choices for a specific reason, and are happy to tell you all you want to know about it... and then some!

    There are also some of us who think the gear we bought is the best (it probably was the best fit, for us), so everyone should use the same thing. There's a fellow I've seen at rallies in about a dozen states who definitely falls into this category. I've nicknamed him "The Oracle."

    As far as cooking goes, it runs the gamut. I get by pretty well with some granola bars, dried fruit, and lots of fluids for breakfast. $5 footlong sandwiches at Subway will take the edge off for lunch, but if it's hot I'll only eat half, and put the other half in the tankbag to "ripen." It usually doesn't make it past the first gas stop. Supper can be anyone's guess, depending on where I'm at- in the "wild," at a campground, or at a rally.

    There are a lot of easy meals to be made once one starts to keep an eye out for ideas. Grocery stores and their delis make a good start. Many times, they'll have good specials. Farmer's markets and roadside stands can often supplement these well. Grocery stores have a lot of "box meal" type items that can be made into a meal for one, two, or more on the cheap- like a couple of bucks per person. A little meat and some fresh or frozen veggies can really liven these up. One's palate and health preferences will determine the details of your choices.

    I have a nice selection of lightweight/compact cooking gear. The longer my tour, the less I cook. If I'm staying in one spot, I'll cook quite a bit. If I'm parking in a new spot every night, I probably won't cook much at all.

    After reading on various forums until you can't take it any more, then camping/cooking for a year or two, pretty soon you'll be an expert!

    Safe travels, happy camping!

  2. #47
    RK Ryder
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    I have tried the cooking while travelling. I've enjoyed morning coffee and used the left over hot water at the campsite for shaving. In the evenings I have ridden into town and picked up something that can be cooked in a pot.

    I really envy folks that do this, but even though my stove is minuscule, and it fits into my pot, there are a number of other items to be taken along for the cleanup. When the pot/stove and cleanup items are laid out, for me, it just adds up to too much additional stuff, even with my touring lids. (I need Jesse bags.) At the beginning of each riding season, I always attempt to get my cooking paraphernalia into my cases, but end up leaving it behind. When I toured with it in 2007, my bike was somewhat overloaded for my liking.

    I prefer to travel light, most times with the tent in the top box, not across the seat. Hence, fruit that I buy every second day, makes for my first breakfast in the motel or at the campsite. That holds me for an hour or two until I come across a restaurant for the second breakfast. If I haven't eaten at a restaurant, sometimes a Subway saved for the campsite passes for supper.

    At a campsite I keep what little food I have in a pannier, a good distance from my tent. I also carry a small knife (better than nothing) and bear spray as there have been more cougar attacks in North America in the last ten years than in the previous one hundred. By not having food, you are less likely to subject yourself to the interest of the local animals (bears, cougars, raccoons, etc.) when camping in the more remote locations.

    Hats off to those who can pack clothes, necessities AND cooking gear.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  3. #48
    TravelsWithBarley.com
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    Whatever you decide, odds are you'll refine your equipment and technique as you go. I'd definitely go with a good, two-person tent. There's simply not enough room in most one-person tents to bring your gear inside if inclement weather hits. I have a pretty nice 2-person EMS tent you're welcome to try for a trip next season. (I now travel with my dog, and since he clawed me when he dreamed about chasing squirrels we moved up to a three-person Nemo, which is an awesome tent and even comes with a claw liner so Barley's claws don't punch thru the floor!) The EMS tent is now just taking up space in the closet.

    Living up north, you definitely want an insulated sleeping pad of some sort. Big Agnes is very good if you sleep on your back. I toss and turn (did I mention I sleep with my dog?) so found the Exped 7 insulated pad much better for me. Thermarest didn't cut it for me, but if you want to give that a try you can have my old one for the cost of postage.

    There's an active thread on food, but I'll second the Subway foot long idea. I also have a JetBoil stove which I love as it sets up and breaks down in a jiffy. I use it for morning coffee and oatmeal, which I supplement with diced fruit and nuts. With Barley doing the pre-wash, cleanup is a cinch. Some people like to stop at an eatery for breakfast but once I get going I like to put a couple hours behind me before stopping.

    Checking out other's setups at rallies is a great idea! I've learned a LOT from my fellow riders. One thing I like to do (with permission of the owner) is to take photos of equipment I'm interested in. That way I have the brand and model saved, and don't have to rely on my often faulty memory.
    '07 R1200GS for solo rides
    '10 R1200GSA with Hannigan dual sport sidecar for rides with Barley

  4. #49
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Camp Food

    Quote Originally Posted by terryjj1 View Post
    QUESTION: how many of you that camp actually prepare your own food? What is the general consensus for food preparation versus going out to eat?
    This really depends on my situation. If I'm hiking or camping alone, I almost always cook breakfast and dinner. If I'm at a rally, there's usually a group breakfast and dinner and folks out riding usually lunch together at a restaurant. I'm not a coffee drinker but have a tough time getting going without hot tea. Tea's often scarce so I bring along tea, a small stove and kettle. If you're very particular about some aspect of your diet, take that into account.

  5. #50
    On the Road
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    Dec 2010
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    Ottawa, Ontario, CAN
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    coffee tea!

    yea, I like the idea of starting the day off with ONE of these.....I guess that water is available at most camp sites...what type of stove is recommended and small enough and light enough to carry?

  6. #51
    RK Ryder
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    Terry, mine is a WhisperLite, runs on gasoline (from gas tank) and is slightly larger than my (small) clenched fist. A small fuel canister which is necessary, is a little larger. However, there are numerous stoves as well that others will recommend. Mountain Co-Op has a wide selection.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  7. #52
    Low speed, high drag
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by terryjj1 View Post
    ...what type of stove is recommended and small enough and light enough to carry?
    Lots of options, and I've tried several.

    I love the MSR Whisperlite International. It fires up like a jet engine, and boils water in no time. It gives you a wide variety of fuel choices, including white gas (Coleman fuel), kerosene, unleaded gas, etc. The biggest drawback is that it doesn't simmer very well.

    I used to use a Coleman Peak 1 self-contained one burner stove. One year while I was turkey hunting, I had some water on to boil for Ramen noodles. My buddy came into camp, fired up his stove, and had a (larger) pot of water boiling before mine did. First order of business when I got back was to order a new Whisperlite International...

    I have since purchased an MSR Dragonfly, which is supposed to simmer much better, but have the same great performance as the Whisperlite. Perhaps we'll find out next rally season!

    FWIW, I don't personally care for stoves that take a pressurized fuel canister- i.e. propane, butane, JetBoil, etc. The JetBoil is extremely popular, so lots of folks disagree with me.

    My objections to the canisters are these:
    -tend to be heavy
    -creating extra trash with the empties
    -some don't do as well in cold weather, 1-lb propane canisters come to mind
    -***fuel may not be available where you are*** Even if you're not traveling to the ends of the earth, the small town that you stop at might not have any propane/butane/JetBoil canisters available. White gas and kerosene are very widely available. If you have a stove that'll burn unleaded, you usually have some of that along, anyway! If you are using unleaded in your stove and you're carrying a quart or even a pint bottle for the stove, then you're also carrying extra fuel for the bike.

    If your bike gets 40 mpg, and you're carrying a pint of extra unleaded for your stove, that's an extra 5 miles of range. 5 miles might not get you home, but it might get you to higher ground, away from a buggy slough, or to some shade. In any event, 5 miles=a lot of pushing!

    Happy shopping.

  8. #53
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Stoves and Water

    Quote Originally Posted by terryjj1 View Post
    yea, I like the idea of starting the day off with ONE of these [coffee & tea].....I guess that water is available at most camp sites...what type of stove is recommended and small enough and light enough to carry?
    Potable water will be available at commercial camp sites, but if you find yourself at a primitive camp site, the quality of the water may be suspect and require some form of treatment. FYI ALL the surface water in North America can be assumed to contain Giardia Lamblia (Beaver Fever).

    I've always been a liquid fuel stove fan and own a bunch of them. I currently use an MSR Whisperlight and Dragonfly when hiking and moto-camping. Both are very small and light. The Dragonfly has the advantage of being able to simmer and run on a variety of fuels, including what the bike runs on. I like the simmer feature because I like to cook. If boiling is enough for you, don't worry about this feature. If you go with liquid fuel, make sure to get one that will burn pump gas.

  9. 01-11-2011, 04:38 PM

  10. #54
    Registered User Beemer01's Avatar
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    Jetboil -

    2 cups of coffee are brought to a boil in under 60 seconds - a canister of fuel will last a long time. Compact and self starting.

    http://www.jetboil.com/products/cook...lcookingsystem

  11. #55
    Registered User froggy's Avatar
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    +1 jetboil.They have 2 sizes of fuel canisters that I know of.Neither of them very big.Both about half the size of a standard PB &J jar.I bought the larger thinking I would go through fuel quickly-wrong. Three Rally's last year and a LOT of hot water and it still feels full.I fit the Jetboil,utencil set,and fuel canister in a dry sack from Wally World that smaller than a beer stine.But again there are many choices on the market.Jetboil was my 1st try and it works for me.Again have fun,the Rallys are great fun,and camping in general can remind you that you were once a kid dreaming of doing what you are about to do.
    We drove all this way for a DEAD END ! My son!!!

    02 Silver RT1150 My 1st BMW Bike
    Craig

  12. 01-14-2011, 01:46 AM

  13. #56
    On the Road
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    Ottawa, Ontario, CAN
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    Stoves

    I looked at the Jetboil and the Whisper lite internationale...both seem to have good reviews and both are very close in price..the thing I like best about the Jetboil is that I don't have to fill it..it is sealed, leak prove and mostly idiot proof..the whipser lite international needs a canister that needs to be filled by me....with either kerosene or gas or whatever.....the jetboil seems to be a cleaner process with less likelihood of an accicdent...I know hundreds of you have used separate self filled fuel containers without issues but I'nm sure there is least one person that has had spillage....nevertheless, I shall look at both and make a descision soon....

  14. 01-18-2011, 03:23 AM

  15. #57
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by terryjj1 View Post
    I looked at the Jetboil and the Whisper lite internationale...both seem to have good reviews and both are very close in price..the thing I like best about the Jetboil is that I don't have to fill it..it is sealed, leak prove and mostly idiot proof..the whipser lite international needs a canister that needs to be filled by me....with either kerosene or gas or whatever.....the jetboil seems to be a cleaner process with less likelihood of an accicdent...I know hundreds of you have used separate self filled fuel containers without issues but I'nm sure there is least one person that has had spillage....nevertheless, I shall look at both and make a descision soon....
    Terry, since I have a WhisperLite and do not find it the most convenient to use, I would not be surprised if in the near future I were to buy a JetBoil. All I tend to cook are liquids, coffee, tea, soup, oatmeal. This would eliminate the need for additional pots. As well, I believe that the gas canister stores inside the JetBoil, once again reducing packing space. When a camper made me hot chocolate from scratch, it seemed to take only a few minutes to assemble, bring the waster to a boil and then serve. I believe that you can also use the JetBoil as a drinking mug, once it has sufficiently cooled down.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  16. #58
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    Ya need one of these.
    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  17. #59
    On the Road
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    Ottawa, Ontario, CAN
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    Question Jetboil

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    Terry, since I have a WhisperLite and do not find it the most convenient to use, I would not be surprised if in the near future I were to buy a JetBoil. All I tend to cook are liquids, coffee, tea, soup, oatmeal. This would eliminate the need for additional pots. As well, I believe that the gas canister stores inside the JetBoil, once again reducing packing space. When a camper made me hot chocolate from scratch, it seemed to take only a few minutes to assemble, bring the waster to a boil and then serve. I believe that you can also use the JetBoil as a drinking mug, once it has sufficiently cooled down.
    Paul,

    I leaning towards the JB more these days after more reading and influence from other user accounts.....yes, it's a little more expensive but you get what you pay for....I'm tired of cheap......that's why i bought a bmw....anyhoo....

    How about those candle type lamps for inside the tent??..are they safe?...do they get incredibley hot?...what would you recommend for interior tent lighting?????

  18. #60
    Amma Holly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by terryjj1 View Post
    Paul,
    How about those candle type lamps for inside the tent??..are they safe?...do they get incredibley hot?...what would you recommend for interior tent lighting?????
    I got a tiny LED lantern (I think at Canadian Tire.) It is much smaller than the candle lamps and much brighter. It's not much bigger than my thumb so helps with the packing. Or Lee Valley has tiny LED lights you just crank--no batteries. They're designed for you keychain so again very small and very handy.
    Volunteer for the 2014 Rally in St. Paul. rallyvolunteer@bmwmoa.org

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