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Thread: New Member and Camping Q's

  1. #16
    2009 R1200RT beemeup's Avatar
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    camping equipment

    Welcome to the boards and welcome to the wonderful world of motorcycle camping! I like things that pack up small and light that add to my camping comfort. I have a cabella's XPG Deluxe 4 person tent, it packs up to about 9lbs and is quite roomy, it is easy to set up and is absolutely waterproof:

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Campi..._SEQ_104303880

    I use a Western Mountaineering down sleeping bag, it is a model they no longer make, but it packs up to the size of a loaf of bread in a compression sack and goes down to about 25 degrees. Great quality products, I'd highly recommend this company.

    I use an luxurylite ultralite cot with a Thermarest Neoair mattress, the cot packs up very small and weighs about 3 lbs, the mattress packs up to the size of a nalgene bottle and weighs under a pound, very, very comfortable sleeping set up.

    http://luxurylite.com/cotindex.html

    http://www.cabelas.com/product/Campi..._SEQ_104484780

    I'd also recommend a Jetboil Java for that quick cup of coffee in the morning.

    http://www.rei.com/product/791310?pr...:referralID=NA

    Welcome again, I hope this information is helpful. Most of this stuff may seem quite expensive, but keep in mind that you'll have a better experience with stuff that works, is easy to use, packs up small and adds to your overall comfort. Good Luck with your choices and shop around, you can find some of this stuff on sale periodically at different retailers. Don

  2. #17
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Tents and Bags

    Some notes on sleeping bag ratings:

    Ratings assume an insulated pad and a tent. I'm a long-time Therm-A-Rest user.

    Each manufacturer has its own system, so the rating numbers are most useful within a manufacture's line.

    The US military developed a system that some manufacturers use. This rating number indicates the minimum temperature that the bag WILL MAINTAIN LIFE. At this temperature you will survive, but not necessarily in comfort.

    People can be classified as "hot" or "cold" sleepers. Hot sleepers require less insulation, cold sleepers more.

    Synthetic insulation looses its power with time and use, especially when stored compressed.

    Quote Originally Posted by terryjj1 View Post
    I'm going to be new to camping from a motorcycle perspective and will need some ideas on what kind of tent to buy that will fit on the bike comfortably....I need to purchase a tent...just me sleeping in it..what brand should I look at
    Terryj
    My take on tents can be found here, but it's a good idea to decide how you plan to carry the tent. Will it be inside hard panniers? Strapped to back? In soft luggage? For most tents, the main body, fly, poles and pegs can be packed separately, giving a lot of flexibility.

    I will again recommend that you head to some places with a number of tents on the floor that you can get inside. MEC is a well known Canadian outfitter and their house brand offers good value. I'm sure there are other outfitters as well.

  3. #18
    2UP RIDER snookers's Avatar
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    Arrow

    You may be interested in checking out Mec.ca a Canadian outfitting company that carries top notch outdoor gear. As an avid backpacker, I always check out their stuff when I'm in the market for gear. When riding solo, everything fits into the rear top case, and when riding two up, I place our gear into two 20 liter dry bags and lash them to the top of the side bags with mesh style bungee cords. Works like a charm. When camping with my bride, I use the MEC Wanderer 2 tent, lots of room, easy set up, and two entrances

    Big Agnes SL2
    http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_d...34374302885936

    Dry Bags
    http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_d...34374302700593


    Thermarest mattreses

    http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_d...bmImage=search






  4. #19
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    Infomative

    thanks paul for the information...I have a couple in mind at the momnet...

    maybe you and the ohthers could have a look at tell me what you think for a newbie camper....


    http://www.mec.ca/Products/product_l...der=descending

    I'm thinking of the MEC Camper 2

    or the MARMOT LIMELIGHT 2P


    http://bushtukah.com/product-list/3-season-tents-pg403/


    this way I can actually see them, crawl inside and have it put together in front of my eyes.....not much selection in this city

    TJ

  5. #20
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Both of these look fine

    The Marmot is going to have more ventilation and has more bells and whistles, but the MEC will work just fine. If I were you, just starting out, I'd go with the MEC, as it's cheaper, big enough, and you don't know if motorcycle camping is your thing anyway.

    Whatever tent you get, get a ground cloth of some sort. Most manufacturers make one to fit their tents or you can get a sheet of plastic or Tyvek and cut it to the shape of the floor, just a little smaller. Your tent will last longer and will be less likely to leak.

  6. #21
    2UP RIDER snookers's Avatar
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    I agree with Stanley.................and if you never realized it already, you have an MEC store in Ottawa




    http://www.mec.ca/Main/content_text....34374302887036

  7. #22
    RK Ryder
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    Terry, if you should not be in a rush, it is winter after all, you could wait until February 25-27 and take your wife for a weekend getaway in Toronto. You know, take in a live theatre production, visit the revamped AGO and the ROM or maybe even take in a Raptors game. Since you're in town anyway, why not drift over to the annual Toronto Outdoor Adventure Show http://www.biztradeshows.com/trade-e...e-toronto.html ? There might be deals to be had and lots of equipment setup for you to checkout.

    Although I am a MEC member, I've always been disappointed with the number of tents they have on display. As well, you could check out the Bass Pro shop at the 400/407. Cabels across the border also have a lot of good equipment.

    Often you will see what you really want, already setup, at a bike rally. There you can talk to the owners about the good and no so good features of their equipment. Hunting for the perfect equipment is half the fun. The half is using equipment that is a good match for you. Good hunting!
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  8. #23
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    All

    All this info is great..and yes I did realize we have a MEC store in town......just impossible to find parking where it's located....nevertheless I will head down there and look into the MEC tents.....Roy..thanks for the links page and I will also check out the cabelas tents...didn't realize there were so many makers available.....I have lots of reading to do.....

    tj

  9. #24
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    I'm not trying to start a rukus

    but i would NOT use bungy cords of any kind when strapping your stuff to your bike.... WAAAYYY too many people have had horrific accidents due to those things breaking.

    just my two cents....
    Somers, NY

    Just enjoying the ride.......

  10. #25
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdpc2 View Post
    but i would NOT use bungy cords of any kind when strapping your stuff to your bike.... WAAAYYY too many people have had horrific accidents due to those things breaking.

    just my two cents....
    +1

    Rok Straps have proved to be a very durable solution and they offer a wide range of sizes. That bent wire hook on the end of most bungy cords is a lethal weapon.

    If you don't want to spend a lot of money, buy some strong cord and learn how to tie a truckers hitch or similar knot. Low cost solution.
    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  11. #26
    Rpbump USN RET CPO Rpbump's Avatar
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    Smile

    I presently use a Catoma Switchback for a tent. Roomy, easy to set up, with two vestibules. There is plenty of room for my twin air mattress , sundries, etc, and enough height for me to dress (not enough to stand as I'm 6'1"). I use straps and a bungee net for odd shaped objects when not towing a trailer. The use of a trailer allows an old ---t like me to carry just about anything while transferring weight thats high on the mc down to the trailer. The Catoma is a two wall tent so touching the inside wall when its raining causes no problem. I've owned several tents with removable rain flys and have found out the hard way that rain/high winds can loosen them allowing the rain to enter your tent. My solution to this is using zip ties over the clips used to hold some rain flys in place. Rain flys that are tied or staked in place so far have not caused me any trouble. A cheap and effective way to keep warm when using an air mattress in cold weather is to use a mylar "space blanket" between your sleeping bag and the air mattress.
    Ride Safe Happy Camping

  12. #27
    Out There Somewhere bmwrider88's Avatar
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    hi and welcome!
    i'd guess that this is the place for info on M/C camping!
    i have a couple things to point out... based more on straight camping experience than actual motorcycle camping... so here goes.

    the concept of trying a tent out is a really good one. they can be a PIA to get in and out of, and may vary wildly depending on things such as headroom. if the weather dictates you stay IN the tent to get dressed or get your boots on, you will thank the heavens for a roomy vestibule. i'd stay away from too small a tent, also. having room for gear makes a big difference. i have a two person tent for solo camping and a three person tent for two up outings. for withstanding heavy weather, go for a 4 season tent. of course this is only my opinion. the reason i say this is that on a 4 season tent, the fly goes all the way to the ground. this goes a long way toward being weatherproof. rain dripping off a shorty fly can soak the area just off the ground, which is vulnerable enough on any given day. the lower parts of a tent is where you're likely to take on water in an extended rain situation. some 4 season tents have zippable panels in the ceiling which can give you better ventilation in warmer weather. some 3/4 season tents have permanent panels of mesh in the ceiling...

    Marmot is a brand of really well thought-out outdoor gear.
    North Face is a brand used by all REALLY SERIOUS expeditionists.

    Van-Go is a brand of European tents i have seen- my friends in the UK use them, where it rains A LOT. they have HUGE vestibules- like big enough to be used as a small living space. no kidding, like a third of the length of the tent in some cases. in fact i have even seen guys pull smaller, vintage BSA motorcycles into a Van-Go Vestibule! the downside is that the windows are much smaller, so in hot weather they might not breathe as well as a lighter-made tent.

    Sierra Trading Post is a great go-to source for discounted camping gear. if you're like me, you could just wind up with several tents, or definitely two. evaluate your likely needs, considering weather, mainly, and go from there. remember that there is a HUGE difference between comfort and discomfort, but a fine line. DO NOT scrimp on the tent. in my opinion, overkill won't do you harm.... well unless you are a guy to know, down to the gram, what everything WEIGHS.
    not that there's anything wrong with that! ha ha jus' sayin'
    is all.

    as for sleeping pads, and sleeping bag fills, everyone's opinions and experience will vary. experience is where your comfort will find its own level. i have a self inflating Thermarest -type pad, and love it. downside? it doesn't pack too small.

    i also have a couple bags. one is heavy, rated at -20(F). Qualofil. i have used it for winter camping but NOT off the bike. my lighter, summer bag, is rated at like 40, or 35 degrees (F), also synthetic. down WILL NOT keep you warn when it gets wet! a few degrees of warmth could just make the difference between life and death... not that you're that level of an extreme outdoorsman, but at high altitude, for example, after maybe a few days of bad weather... well you just don't know. on a long trip or extended stay in camp, you cannot predict what might happen. better to be prepared than to be caught off guard.

    compression sacks will help you get your size down to the minimum on things like sleeping bags, or clothes.

    i use dry bags to tote all gear that will make the difference in comfort (or not) in bad weather. SealLine is a good proven brand. i have several sizes, up to a big duffel. all sleeping gear, and maybe a change of clothes, at least, go into the dry bags.

    i have BMW *liners* for my panniers so that my clothes are reasonably well protected, the beauty is that you can hand carry the contents of your panniers into your tent (OR ROOM ha ha) with ease!

    finally-
    sleeping pads, and sleeping bags, are NOT meant to be stored stuffed or packed. unpack them when not in use and hang them up, and you'll get far more life out of them than otherwise.

    sorry to be so long winded.
    good luck, and happy trails!

  13. #28
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwrider88 View Post
    Van-Go is a brand of European tents i have seen- my friends in the UK use them, where it rains A LOT. they have HUGE vestibules- like big enough to be used as a small living space.
    This is one of two reasons that I bought my Wynnster Monaco 4 Tent last fall from the U.K. The the 2 door vestibule is about the same size, maybe slightly bigger, than the sleeping area. Lots of room for my stuff. The other reason is that the tent can be erected in the rain with the fly first and the actual tent can be kept dry. (Of course I really doubt if I'll use this feature. I have taken tents down many times in the rain, but have always opted to skip tenting and gone directly to the closest motel at the end of rainy day rides.)
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  14. #29
    al from chgo burbs lilredroadster's Avatar
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    Just thought I would join in the conversation....................
    I have been using an REI Campdome 2 tent with a ground cloth, a Northface Chrysallis bag, and a Thermorest, all for about 10 yrs, to many rallies. All I have ever had to do was replace the tent stakes with some that wont bend ( a recomendation for any tent) and Spray some waterproofing spray on the door and rainfly every spring, just in case. Last year I did replace the rainfly pole since the original was duct taped for about 3 yrs. No tent pole will withstand being stepped on!
    I will eventually get a Big Agnes matress if my Thermorest ever poops out.
    Getting decent camping equipment is worth the expense.
    Also remember a small packable chair, I use the cheap five dollar kind that can be thrown out if they break. Most of my friends use a Kermit Chair, but I guess I am a cheapskate!
    Have fun!!!!!
    Al From Chgo Burbs
    BETTERMENT THROUGH BADGERMENT

  15. #30
    Motorsickle Rider brisco's Avatar
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    I would suggest checking out www.fullthrottlecamping.com
    Great gear and a company formed by riders for riders.
    Be sure to check out the article on motorcycle camping in the FAQ menu.

    No affiliation, other than being a satisfied customer.

    Also an advrider.com discount if you're a member of that forum.

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