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Thread: What are you reading?

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  1. #1
    criminaldesign
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    What are you reading?

    Read a number of books in the last few weeks and a couple of re-reads.

    Re-Reads
    My War Gone By, I Miss It So, Anthony Loyd
    Freaking great book by war correspondent Anthony Loyd. This is about his time during the Bosnian War and the Chechen/Russian Conflict with personal parts. You thought the concentration camps and conflicts of the World Wars were bad... The Bosnian parts are riddled with such brutality from man its sad, all for the sake of killing cos they can. It's such a jumble of a mess, 3 factions fighting each other and themselves with civilians caught in the middle. Highly recommended. Finished it this afternoon.

    In The Heart of the Sea, Nathaniel Philbrick
    Another great book on what a human can endure. This is on the story of the Nantucket Whale ship, the Essex. This is the real life story that was the inspiration to Moby Dick. Men adrift in the Pacific for 80+ days which ultimately led to cannibalism and question of sanity.

    New Reads:
    The Girl in a Swing, Richard Adams
    Super good and creepy story taking place mainly in England. A shop keeper is in the Netherlands on business and falls in love with a strange girl from Germany. This is a ghost story and thriller, and very weird. From the author of Watership Down.

    A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney.
    Hell you can't go wrong with this guy. Cracks me up while totally making sense. Second book of his I've read. Found at Grandma's during Thanksgiving.

    The Crucible, Arthur Miller
    We all know this story. I seen it on the boob tube and stage, I found it on my cousins bookshelf (also during Thanksgiving) and tore through it. A good symbolism between the Salem Witch Trials and McCarthyism. Afraid of what we don't understand and concepts.

    The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway
    Also found on my cousins book shelf. This book was torture to be honest. The characters I couldn't stand, but the setting was great, between France and Spain. The characters were labeled as expatriates from US and UK. They were pompous and shallow. I would rather read about the exploits and binges of Kerouac and Cassidy any day. Regardless, a group of friends that hate each other head to Spain for fishing and bullfighting. On the bright side, the writing of the bullfighting was great and makes me was to go to one. This man loves to write about drinking.

    A Farewell to Arms, Hemingway
    This was a good and tragic love story. Taking place during WWI from the perspective of an American working as an ambulance driver for the Italians, while falling in love with a nurse from Scotland who is also assisting the Italians. Hemingway wrote in away that made it easy visualizing the war and setting. This man loves to write about drinking.

    Now onto a new book.

  2. #2
    Bill Burke
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    Edwin Coddington's "The Gettysburg Campaign". Unbelievable what those men went through. March for 25 miles in the July heat, with pack, arrive at the battlefield and be ordered to attack...NOW.

  3. #3
    Registered User ALIENHITCHHIKER's Avatar
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    Currently reading "The World Made Straight", Ron Rash

    Just finished "The Lacuna", Barbara Kingsolver

    Prior to that "Blood Meridian", Cormac McCarthy

    If you enjoy a well written novel - and are not afraid to permit your assumptions to be challenged - you'll appreciate these.

    Criminal, if you've not yet read "For Whom the Bell Tolls" it's worth looking at. It may be one of Hemingway's best - even though most of the profanity was censored (He still sneaks some in, albeit in Spanish). It was also produced as a politically sanitized film in 1943 starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman - but the film holds up best only if you've already read the novel.
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  4. #4
    Registered User Bob_M's Avatar
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    Just finished
    The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie. Yup the same guy who stars in House. The book is a riot . It is a mystery/thriller where the main character is a tough, wise cracking, irreverent former Scotts Guard. The character's voice carries a lot of the amusing snark of House. Fun, easy read (with large print)

    On a serious note The Places In Between by Rory Stewart is a novelized journel of his walk across Afganistan. True story that haunts for months after the book is finished.

  5. #5
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    "The Complete History of World War II" Armed Services Memorial Edition by Francis
    Trevelan Miller 1949

  6. #6
    criminaldesign
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    Quote Originally Posted by ALIENHITCHHIKER View Post
    Prior to that "Blood Meridian", Cormac McCarthy

    Criminal, if you've not yet read "For Whom the Bell Tolls" it's worth looking at. It may be one of Hemingway's best - even though most of the profanity was censored (He still sneaks some in, albeit in Spanish). It was also produced as a politically sanitized film in 1943 starring Gary Cooper and Ingrid Bergman - but the film holds up best only if you've already read the novel.
    Right on Alien.

    Yeah, those were the first Hemingway I've read. In the 2 I listed they were also censored. There was a side note in the forward about the censorship demands from the publisher. I will definitely pick up For Whom the Bell Tolls.

    BTW, Blood Meridian is one of my favs. That's a another book I read twice, and very well will probably read it again. My favorite 'western' by far. The Judge is a great character. Very similar to the girl from 'The Girl in a Swing'. How long has he been around and exactly where does he come from.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob_M
    Just finished
    The Gun Seller by Hugh Laurie. Yup the same guy who stars in House. The book is a riot . It is a mystery/thriller where the main character is a tough, wise cracking, irreverent former Scotts Guard. The character's voice carries a lot of the amusing snark of House. Fun, easy read (with large print)
    I may have to check out that. He's also a fabulous british comedian from back in the day.

  7. #7
    Yankee Air Pirate
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    Hmm what an interesting thread... I read about 6-7 books a week so this could be a nightly posting event.


    Last night it was "Radical Evolution: The Promise and Peril of Enhancing OUr Minds, Our Bodies, and What it means to Be Human" by Joel Garreau.

    Tonight it is "Futurehype: The Myths of Technological Change" by Bob Seidensticker


    The question of both: does technology drive society/history at an exponential rate?

  8. #8
    GIZMO
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    Currently reading The Richness of Life, The Essential Stephen J. Gould. A wonderfully compiled collection of his essays.

  9. #9
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    I'm not a big reader of novels / books but I am just getting close to finishing Ghost Rider by Neil Peart.

    It's an interesting journey, his trip, life and reading the book. I'm in the section now where he's basically reprinting/recounting second party letters he wrote to various friends during and after his trip. Some of it is tough to follow because it's hard to tell whether he's in the first person or second person.

    Like a rough section in a washed out road though I'm determined to get through it!

    Happy Holidays!

    RobStar

  10. #10
    criminaldesign
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    Jane Eyre. Great story and not what I expected.

    Also burned through Sh*t My Dad Says. Funny stuff to relate to. Extremely easy read, both Dad and I read it today.

    Currently reading 101 Biggest Bastards and Gulag Archipelago - CREEPY!

  11. #11
    sMiling Voni's Avatar
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    Mark Twain's Autobiography . . .

    From Wikipedia:

    Autobiography of Mark Twain or Mark TwainÔÇÖs Autobiography refers to a lengthy set of reminiscences, dictated, for the most part, in the last few years of American author Mark Twain's life and left in typescript and manuscript at his death. The Autobiography comprises a rambling collection of anecdotes and ruminations rather than a conventional autobiography.
    BIG book. I'll have to wait 25 years for Volume 2 . . .

    Voni
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  12. #12
    High & Dry statdawg's Avatar
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    Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia by Michael Korda

    I recently read a lenghty article about him now I have an extensive biography. There is an interesting podcast on Amazon about the work here.

    I always admired his love of motorcycling. Even in the 1920-30's he rode 500 mile days in England and on one of my all time favorite motorcycles, the Brough Superior.
    If one cannot command attention by one's admirable qualities one can at least be a nuisance

  13. #13
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    Just finished Liberty And Tyranny by Mark Levin. Now reading Contempoary Europe A History. By H. Stuart Hughes It's European history from 1914-1970.

  14. #14
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PT9766 View Post
    If it's Lawrence of Arabia and Brough Superior motorcycles you're interested in there are two books published in 2010 which you should read -

    "Brough Superior - the Complete Story" by Peter Miller, published by Crowood Press.

    And "Legends in Their Lifetime - George Brough & Lawrence of Arabia" by the late C.E Allen, published by the Vintage Motor Cycle Club of England.

    Both books available through the Vintage Motor Cycle Club at http://www.vmcc.net/

    There is more interesting, and behind the scenes information, about Broughs and Lawrence in those two books than most people in the world will ever really want to know.

    Korda's book is very good and interesting about Lawrence and his life and times - particularly the political and his continuing impact on the middle East. However Korda seems, in my view, to have never considered the motorcycling aspect of Lawrence's life as of any great significance until the accident of May, 1935.PT9766
    I have read reviews and heard him interviewed on his book tour but have yet to read Korda's book. I have long felt that biographers of Lawrence have not understood what motorcycling really means to the understanding of him. It may take a motorcyclist to have the insight into that importance and not just dismiss it as an anomaly resulting in his demise. Thanks for the book suggestions. I will have to seek them out.
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  15. #15
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    The March by Doctorow
    A fictionalized account of Sherman's march through the South during the Civil War. Tells the story through the eyes of various characters. making it very entertaining.

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