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Thread: Riding CO and UT

  1. #16
    Grow'd up Mini Trail munchy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    Excellent Colorado & Utah dirt roads website. http://www.traildamage.com/trails/index.php
    Nice link, Joe. But the book travels better to the throne.

    2002 R1150GS
    MOA #104910, Twisted Shaft Motorcycle Club #241

  2. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Munchy View Post
    Nice link, Joe. But the book travels better to the throne.
    Doug, that is exactly why you own a laptop!!
    tho maybe in that location it would better be addressed as a "next to my lap. top."
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  3. #18
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    DOG trick ,IAN:)

    One I've found to almost always work! Beef Jerky. The meanest dogs are always hungry too. My jerky is almost always easy to get too and handy and a rushing dog, about to have your leg for a treat, will all of a sudden be your best friend with dried steak in your hands. You just have to act fast and have the jerky ready. Now, this is a trick in itself. Works though. Randy

  4. #19
    Sam...I am
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    North rim or south? South is a zoo, but a wonderful new visitor center. To me, north rim is just much better to experience-1000' higher also. Plus from the north rim, you are just so much closer to Zion, Bryce, and the lesser known but most powerful Cedar Breaks.

    If Auto Club member, the regional map 'Indian Country' is terrific. I have worn out many of these over the years.

    Your going to get alot of advice, and just about none of it will be misguided. The west is truly amazing.

  5. #20
    MAYLETT
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    I second the BURR Trail idea.
    And I'll give it, and the rest of what Polarbear mentioned, a strong third. And this is coming from a local who grew up in south-central Utah, and has spent many a night and day exploring the remote places in the area for a good many years.

  6. #21
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    The South Rim is lower by about 1K feet, and definitely more touristy. But it has better access to the actual rim at numerous viewpoints. The North Rim is higher, more remote, and less populated.

    Both N and S rims are busy during the summer months, and even campgrounds are booked up months in advance.

    My suggestion is to book two nights at the North Rim and two nights at the South Rim through the appropriate vendors. At the N rim there are cottages and "motel rooms" that stretch back a half mile into the woods. You want the "western" cottage (meaning it has a western style porch, but the westerns are right on the rim, and close to the lodge, restaurant, etc.

    At the South rim you want a main floor room at El Tovar. If you're going to spend money for a room, don't settle for some chain dump outside the park. El Tovar is right there, the original "railroad" hotel, literally steps away from the rim. Grab a cup of coffee in the morning, stroll out to the rim, and watch the Condors soaring.

    Here's what the bellman suggested: look online and see what's available for the time frame you have in mind. Check a couple of days in either direction. But don't book online. Call the front desk directly, explain what you want and when, and see what they have available. If nothing is available, don't panic. Call back a few days later--and a few days later. People cancel all the time.

    For accomodations at the Canyon, do a search for "Grand Canyon Lodging" There are campgrounds both inside and outside the park boundaries, but nothing close to the rim--which is where you want to be.

    Yes, definitely stop at the Cameron Trading Post on your way to the east entrance to the South Rim. DO NOT order a "full" Navajo Taco unless you're going to split with a family of four. Breakfasts and lunches are also great, but if there are more than two tour busses in the parking lot, be prepared for a wait. No problem, you can cruise through the post while waiting. Yes, they have Navajo Tacos for breakfast. There are motel rooms at Cameron, but this is definitely indian country. Lots of touristy farkles to look at, plus some hand made Navajo rugs. (take two aspirin and sit down before checking the prices)

    There are some interesting backroads around and in the park. But they are time consuming. I'd suggest spending your time at the Canyon mostly as a pedestrian, and do some of those other really interesting dirty roads elsewhere, as mentioned by others.

    pmdave

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnR100RS View Post
    The Moke Dugway (sic) around the four corners and another dirt road that goes from Chama ,NM to Bayfield Co . Good Luck .
    Mokie Dugway.




    its UT 261, between Mexican Hat and some road junction west of Blandings. SE corner of Utah.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  8. #23
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    More info on the Moqui (Mokee, Mokie, etc.) Dugway at

    http://www.midwestroads.com/otherstates/mokidugway/

    pmdave

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    One I've found to almost always work! Beef Jerky. The meanest dogs are always hungry too. My jerky is almost always easy to get too and handy and a rushing dog, about to have your leg for a treat, will all of a sudden be your best friend with dried steak in your hands. You just have to act fast and have the jerky ready. Now, this is a trick in itself. Works though. Randy
    I can see the ad now: BMW accessory leather holster sized just right for two sticks of emergency beef jerky. Includes leg strap for quick draw capability. Sleeve-end hidden "six shooter" model also available with powerful spring action. Shoots one stick of jerky every time you straighten your arm and point, up to six sticks. Can be color matched to Aerostich jackets.
    Warning! Avoid attempting to attract waitress for bill, or waving at other bikers, with a loaded "six shooter".

    pmdave

  10. #25
    MAYLETT
    Guest
    As long as we're posting photos, here are some of the Burr Trail. The scenery and switchback section is similar to the Moki Dugway but a bit more remote and wild. Plan the right route, and you can easily ride them both without any backtracking. Really, the photos make the switchbacks look worse then they actually are. A good part of the Burr Trail is paved (sort of) to accommodate the occasional tourist sedan (bottom photo). There was a great deal of controversy and environmental lawsuits filed a few years back when the local county decided to pave a section of it.


    Aerial view of Burr Trail Waterpocket Fold climb switchbacks.


    Looking east from the top of the Waterpocket Fold switchbacks in Capitol Reef Nat'l Park.


    Mostly minimally paved section of Burr Trail through Long Canyon, near Boulder, Utah

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