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Thread: Portable air pump and tire plugging kit

  1. #16
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stanley83 View Post
    Anyone have a chart for how many grams of CO2 are required to fill tires of different sizes? I use CO2 inflators for my bicycles and have several CO2 "pumps", but have no idea how much CO2 or how many cartridges I would need for a motorcycle or scooter tire.
    Three of the 12 gram cartridges brought the rear tire of the sport bike I was helping at the time to about 20 PSI... enough for him to ride very slowly the several miles to the nearest gas station. A 16 gram cartridge would have done a bit better. My emergency tire repair kit contains 6 cartridges.

    Quote Originally Posted by stanley83 View Post
    p.s. I have an electric pump, but over the weekend I ran my Vespa's battery flat trying to top up a tire. It could have been bad had I not been near a gas station.
    If I've got the panniers on the bike (usually) then I've got an air pump. I do not run the pump unless the engine is running.

  2. #17
    GREGFUESS
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    Two electric pumps under $50

    I have the Aerostich Mini Compressor, it is a great pump for the money, $45. Aerostich is also selling a Stop and Go Compressor for $35, if they had offered it when I was in the market. The Cycle Pump Air Compressor works well for a pricey $100.

    Greg

  3. #18
    Rally Rat
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    My final answer

    Thanks for all the great advise.
    I ended up ordering a AirMan Tour compressor (based on webBike World review) and a Dyna Plug kit from Amazon.com with free shipping. I hope I never need to find out if they work, but if I do, they work well. And yes, I will test the compressor and read the instructions from the DynaPlugger kit.
    Last edited by wzellwzell@yahoo.com; 12-06-2010 at 04:41 AM.

  4. #19
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Looking for belt and suspenders...

    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    If I've got the panniers on the bike (usually) then I've got an air pump. I do not run the pump unless the engine is running.
    I've never had a problem with my CyclePump run from the battery on my R75/6, but a Vespa P200 has a smaller battery and a MUCH weaker stater, so weak that you can't run higher than 35w headlight bulbs. With the engine running, it still ran the battery flat.

  5. #20
    Just me rad's Avatar
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    I have been through a couple of pumps and tire patching systems. The set up that has worked the best for me; this includes patching tires on the road on my VFR, GS, KTM and other folk’s bikes and airing up numerous times when changing tire pressure dual sporting is my Slime pump and string plugs with glue from the auto parts store. I recently added a Dynaplug kit but have not used it yet.

    The kit that has failed me more than once, and yes, I know how to use it, is the Stop and Go tire plugger.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    I figured out why your scratching your head-I spelled Meijers wrong!I left out the J!
    Actually just stirring up some fun...

    For those needing entertainment about small pumps: there was a guy about two years ago on Advrider that went out and bought one of all he could find then timed each one as it filled a flat tire, then listed the results,THEN he listed them "for sale" in the flea market there. I wouldn't necessarily call it scientific, but was good info. if your shopping. I keep my Meijer's pump in my camper and my Slime on the bike.

  7. #22
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyfr View Post
    Used my Stop-n-Go plugger and Slime pump this morning to fix the rear tire. Started going flat on I-35 (I thought it was the wind blowing me in weird directions).
    That's what you get for riding on I-35
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  8. #23
    Rally Rat RTRandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    That's what you get for riding on I-35
    Ouch !!!!

  9. #24
    lastsix
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    +1 on the slime pump. I also carry the Aerostich Expedition Pocket Plugger Tubeless Tire Repair Kit #4936.

  10. #25
    Touring Panpsychist Theo's Avatar
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    If you haven't tried out your compressor/tire plugger, you may want to practice on an old auto tire. Since Se??or Murphy is known to frequent our lives, your flat may occur in dim light or bad weather, and knowing the procedure could make the experience easier to handle.
    Theo

    2009 R1200RT, 2007 Shadow Aero 750 (sold)
    2012 MINI Countryman S, 2004 MINI Cooper S JCW, 2000 BMW 328i

  11. #26
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by kantuckid View Post
    I figured out why your scratching your head-I spelled Meijers wrong!I left out the J!
    Actually just stirring up some fun...

    For those needing entertainment about small pumps: there was a guy about two years ago on Advrider that went out and bought one of all he could find then timed each one as it filled a flat tire, then listed the results,THEN he listed them "for sale" in the flea market there. I wouldn't necessarily call it scientific, but was good info. if your shopping. I keep my Meijer's pump in my camper and my Slime on the bike.

    Actually it was the "huge retired police pensions" comment that got my attention.

    I keep checking the mail for a more impressive check, but nothing so far!

    I realize you're "stirring up fun," and I took it in fun as well.

    Enjoy your Holidays!
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  12. #27
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    Stick to string type plugs - less chance of problems than the cutesy rubber ones of various types.

    The T handle tools are useful compared to a straight handle cheapy. The better grip makes things easier and should you try to use one of the cheapies on a heavier tires (eg like for light trucks) you may well find you cannot force it into the tire due to inadequate grip.

    And last
    Test the pump under load for at least 7-8 minutes on its actual bike installation setup. Roadside is no place to find out (if you bought one of the cheapies) that the pump dies (very common with cheap compressors) or draws so much current it fries your wires or blows fuses. And if you have no experience using plugs, get an old tire and practice a few times.

    If you are good at it, it is possible to install a plug in a partially filled tire only loosing a few lbs of air pressure- makes inflating easier and, if you spot the incipient flat soon enough, might be enough air left for a slow speed run to a nearby pump. My preferred method for doing a small puncutre is to pull in to the nearest air pump and do it there, if at all possible. Many times, breaking out the pump you carry can be avoided.

  13. #28
    Nuckin' Futs! tonyfr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    That's what you get for riding on I-35
    That's what I get for riding with Chuck! I also blew a headlight before the breakfast run, so I thought I would just cut the trip short and go back home.
    SABMWRA MOA #62
    2005 BMW R1200RT
    2008 Honda CBR1000RR LE
    1984 Kawasaki 750 Turbo E1

  14. #29
    Low speed, high drag
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    +1 for the string-style plugs on steel-belted radials.

    I had a Stop-n-Go plugger that I used with great success on bias-ply tires. It looked kind of like a caulking gun, and inserted a mushroom-headed plug. I rode a plugged tire for several thousand miles after repairing it that way, with no ill effects. (Yes, I know it was stupid. I was in college, and it seemed like a good risk/benefit at the time. No more of that going on here...)

    I've since had several unsatisfactory experiences using the Stop-n-Go mushroom plugs on steel-belted radials. Once on my Honda Valkyrie, where the plugs were only lasting a few miles apiece, and once on my buddie's R1200CL, where the plug lasted about 20 miles.

    In my experience, the steel belts seem to "saw" through the plug, and the tire spits out the stem of the plug. The mushroom heads remain in the tire, as seen when the tires were changed. I spoke to the Stop-n-Go rep at Gillette a couple of years ago, and he thought that twistin the rat-tail rasp tool in the hole should smooth down the steel belts and eliminate the problem. I remain unconvinced.

    I ended up patching the CL's tire with a string-type plug after the mushroom failed, and we made it home about 450 miles (on a Sunday, had to be to work the next AM, etc.).

    Long story short, I just carry the string-type plugs now. They've worked well for me, are available nearly everywhere, can (supposedly) be used in numbers to patch bigger holes in an emergency, etc.

    YMMV.

  15. #30
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=UncleHowie;639494 I spoke to the Stop-n-Go rep at Gillette a couple of years ago, and he thought that twistin the rat-tail rasp tool in the hole should smooth down the steel belts and eliminate the problem. I remain unconvinced.
    YMMV.[/QUOTE]


    I had the spitting plug issue on the OEM Dunlop on my 05RT...after learning to really clear the hole with the rasp...especially on Metzlers and Dunlops...have had great results from the mushroom style plugs...but I carry both types as slash/odd size type holes will not seal with a mushroom plug. If I pull a nail or screw out, I will use the Stop-N-Go . My results anyway.
    If the tire is relatively new, I will go home and put a radial patch on the inside and ride until it's worn out. Depends on where the hole is and how worn the tire is.
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

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