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Thread: Are the newer BMW's going to last?

  1. #31
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by zoridog View Post
    The only thing I ever asked my old Honda 750 to do was start and not stall.
    I was the same way. When I bought a new (but wrecked) 75 CB500T, I was shocked to discover that the kick start had been eliminated. All of my older Hondas and a Suzuki had one that was used frequently.

    Also, back in the "good old days", many if not most bikes were junked before they reached 20,000 miles. The 500-600 mile days many of us frequently ride today just didn't happen bacn then due to both the roads and the punishment we endured on the bikes of the day even if they didn't break down.

    Many of the problems most often complained about now are at miles seldom reached years ago or even now on most other brands of bikes.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  2. #32
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    I'm with marchyman.

    I don't own anything else that is as easy to service as my 08 RT although my nearly 20 yr old highly modded Lexus SC300 comes close.

    Only bikes I ever owned that were this easy were all two stroke smokers where even a complete motor rebuild was a simple job and clutches took minutes, not a day. But I probably spent enough time oiling and adjusting those old chains to do all the routine service on an R1200RT for a couple hundred thousand miles. When you rode in the 60s you had to know how to fix stuff- was no such thing as "roadside assistance" for bikes. And only the intrepid few did the longs runs that so many of us who contribute to this forum consider just a fun way to spend a few days.

    Only issue with the modern stuff is that workarounds aren't possible for some types of electrical/electronic failure (though there are workarounds for most of the common ones) and some parts that can fail are hugely expensive and both cost prohibitive and too large to carry as spares.

    Friend of mine who services BMWs just had a customer bring him a bike with a dead battery, saying it made a noise and died on the highway and he hadn't been able to restart it. While starting a routine service my friend drained it and found only 1 qt of black oil in it. When refilled to correct level and started it ran fine for a few minutes but when warmed then made so much noise that his wife heard it in their house that adjoins the shop and came out to see what had destructed. Owner had trashed the lower end bearings thoroughly for failure to do any normal maintenance and not noticed the bike only had about 1/4 of the required oil fill in it. You've got to wonder how many complaints you read about come from folks like that owner who've got not the foggiest notion of how to care for a machine, manage to ignore warning lights, etc etc. He's got similar stories for other brands so BMW owners aren't unique.

  3. #33
    Registered User f14rio's Avatar
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    as i see it....

    A motorcycle functions entirely in accordance with the laws of reason, and a study of the art of motorcycle maintenance is really a miniature study of the art of rationality itself.

    ...
    There is no physical training regimen so strict that it can't be undermined by a rigorous program of deferred motorcycle maintenance.
    ...

    If BMW's Were Built By Microsoft (or ridden by Bill Gates)

    1. For no reason whatsoever your bike would crash twice a day.

    2. Every time you wanted to ride a different road, you’d have to buy a new bike.

    3. Occasionally your bike would die for no reason, and you would accept this, restart and ride on.

    4. Occasionally, something as simple as a left turn, would cause your bike to shut down and refuse to start, in which case you have to reinstall the entire engine.

    5. Macintosh would make a BMW that was powered by the sun, reliable, five times as fast, and twice as easy to ride, but it would only run on five percent of the interstates.

    6. You wouldn’t be able to ride more than one bike on the same road unless you bought "BikeXP" or "BikeNT".

    7. The bike would say "Are you sure?" before applying the brakes.

    8. For no reason whatsoever, your bike would sometimes refuse to run until you grabbed the plug wire, stuck your finger in the exhaust, and used the kick start, all at the same time.

    9. You would be required to wear riding gear manufactured by the same company who built your BMW. Deleting this option would cause the bike's performance to drop by 50% or more.

    10. Every time a BMW introduced a new model, buyers would have to learn to ride all over again because none of the controls would operate in the same manner as the old bike.

    11. You'd press the "Start" button to shut off the engine.
    "Enemy fighters at 2 o'clock!...Roger, What should i do until then?"

    2010 r1200r, 2009 harley crossbones, 2008 triumph/sidecar, 1970 norton commando 750

  4. #34
    Cave Creek AZ 85k100lt's Avatar
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    "Untrue statement" "Hog wash"

    "The question put "Are the new BMW's going to last?" The answer is yes, but like most other new vehicles, they will need to be serviced by trained technicians. The days of working on vehicles (cars and bikes) have passed given the amount of computer controlled systems."


    The new bikes/ cars with all the computer controls are easier to fix than older bikes/cars.


    The so called factory trained tech at the dealership has access to spare parts that he/she can install to test ie "part swapper's" no diagnostic ability.


    Undererstanding and diagnosing a problem is a real skill but does require time in this day and age of instant gradification

    Think about it!!
    1974 R75/6 W Sidecar
    1989 R100GS


  5. #35
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    Undererstanding and diagnosing a problem is a real skill but does require time in this day and age of instant gradification
    U got that right!
    I recently took one of my cars, a twenty year old SAAB with the "anti lock" light on constantly to the nearest dealer (400 mile round trip) and the service department recommended replacing a pressure switch as the first step in diagnosing the problem at a cost of nearly six hundred dollars. This after they had the car in their shop for two days while wife and I languished in a motel. I asked them if they were sure if that was the problem and they replied if the light stayed on they could be sure the switch WASN'T the problem. I told them to forget it and paid them their two hundred bucks for looking at it and brought it home. I found that sitting still the anti lock light would go out after the ignition on self test completed and only came back on at speeds over twenty miles per hour. Thus I deduced the problem had to be in one or more of the wheel speed sensors. I took the car into my shop and began pulling wheels and tires off to inspect the speed sensors. The second one I removed, the right front, revealed that the wire from the sensor had been rubbing the inside of the wheel and worn through the outer insulation, the shielding braid and into the core of the wire itself, shorting it out. I have ordered a new sensor and wire assembly from SAAB at a total cost of less than two hundred dollars. I'll figure out how to replace it when it arrives. Diagnosis by replacement is a dealers best salesman. And an indication of poorly trained wrench twisting idiots in their service departments.:
    Marty - in the western Oregon mountains.'06RT, (gone '04RT, '86 Venture Royal, '81 Yamaha Virago920, '82Suzuki GS1100GK, '76 Suzuki GT750, Triumph 750 Bonneville, BSA Road Rocket 650, 61" Harley knucklehead)

  6. #36
    Registered User Freightdawg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MPMARTY View Post
    Diagnosis by replacement is a dealers best salesman. And an indication of poorly trained wrench twisting idiots in their service departments.
    AMEN!

    When I purchased my '98 RT in 2008, it was due for its 48K check-up. I'd started having problems with the ABS lights not extinguishing and asked them to take a look at it.

    When I got the bike back, the problem was worse than before. Before I brought it in, I could usually stop the bike, turn it off, restart it, then the lights would go out. After I got the bike back, nothing I did would get the lights to extinguish. So, back to the shop I went.

    The "technician" was convinced the battery was the problem. Well, let's put a new one in and test that theory. Nope. After a protracted wait in the show room that included a walk down the block to the local diner for lunch, the conclusion was the ABS unit. How much? $2300--just for the part.

    Um, no thanks. Never had a bike with ABS before. Don't think I'll miss it.

    I started doing some more research and figured I could change it myself and found one on eBay for about $400. I got it changed out (with a little help from a buddy of mine) and STILL no ABS.

    Fast forward about a year, and I needed to take the bike to the shop for something totally unrelated. Because I'd had such an unpleasant experience with my local BMW dealership, I took it to another dealership about 2 hours away. While it was there I asked them to try and diagnose the problem with my ABS. $75/ hour--minimum 1 hour to take a look. As my father-in-law always tells me, "It's only money."

    It took the new technician all of 2 seconds to diagnose the problem. When my local shop replaced the rear brake disk, they FAILED to reinstall the ABS ring.

    I took the bike back to the local shop and, to their credit, they replaced the ABS ring at no charge (as they should have).

    And the ABS has worked perfectly ever since. I have a sneaking suspicion the ABS unit was never the problem. Unfortunately, I got rid of the original unit before I found out about the ring.

    Sorry for the rambling. I hope BCK Rider and his friend can find ABS tranquility.

  7. #37
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freightdawg View Post

    It took the new technician all of 2 seconds to diagnose the problem. When my local shop replaced the rear brake disk, they FAILED to reinstall the ABS ring.

    I took the bike back to the local shop and, to their credit, they replaced the ABS ring at no charge (as they should have).
    That is truly frightening!
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  8. #38
    just hangin' out 2bikemike's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasT View Post
    My '07 R1200R has 161k miles on it and still works like it's brand spanking new! No issues whatsoever. And that ABS has certainly saved my 6 more than once!

    I had the great mechanics at the local BMW shop in Austin take a look at it before my summer trip, and all they really had to do was change the fluids and slap on some new rubber! Wonderful machine! I'd match my Roadster with any other bike out there as an example of near-perfect engineering!

    I too look forward to riding this BMW well into the next decade!

    T
    So you have ridden 53,600 miles on average for the last 3 years? How does one do that?
    keep it light enough to travel.....
    2013 GL1800 Goldwing
    '81 Honda CB650 Custom

  9. #39
    Mars needs women! 35634's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BikeMike View Post
    So you have ridden 53,600 miles on average for the last 3 years? How does one do that?
    Maybe he meant to say his '37 R12.....that's only 2205 miles per year
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  10. #40
    Aging Cafe` Racer
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    The '85 K100RS I bought new and the '79 R100RT I inherited after my dad quit riding were both bullet proof, as was the R1150 RT I rode for a few years and also the 1200 Triumph Trophy I bought after that. In fact the only bikes that have left me stranded in 31 years of street riding were both V4 Honda's with melted electrics.

    I admit I was a little apprehensive about buying another BMW after reading the horror stories about flaming rear hubs and can-bus failures. However as previously noted they total about 2% of the bikes sold, hardly cause for alarm IMO. Besides, the GS is about as basic a bike as you can get and the only thing I really require is the ABS. I can live without electronic suspension and a trip computer if I it is prohibitively expensive to repair assuming it even fails in the first place......

  11. #41
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BikeMike View Post
    So you have ridden 53,600 miles on average for the last 3 years? How does one do that?
    As surprising as it may seem, some folks actually do ride that much. I don't, but I am married to somebody that did for many years. Interestingly, now that we have retired and she doesn't commute most days to work, she is down to only about 40,000 to 45,000 miles a year. Me - I only ride about 35,000 miles a year.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  12. #42
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    As surprising as it may seem, some folks actually do ride that much. I don't, but I am married to somebody that did for many years.
    That's an accurate statement. I was the owner of the first R11RSL in NM in May 93. When I traded it in at Deming Cycle Center in September 1995, it had well over 100,000 on it [it was NOT my only bike] - some of which was accumulated riding with the lovely lass in red Paul has somehow remained married to all these years - which proves two things really. 1) She's one hell of a rider and 2) Like "The Woman" that sticks with me, she's tough enough to hang with Paul.

    When Deming Cycle Center did a bottom end on "Old Moldy", my 1973 R75/5 LWB, it had 387,000 miles on it. I bought it new in 1972. Between 1972 and 1974, she was my only transportation and that's when she gained the most miles.

    Those of us living in the southwest generally ride year round, which makes our mileage seem a little high to those of you with seasonal weather.

    As to Paul's flame - bear in mind that when she was accumulating mileage - they lived in Kansas - which DOES have seasonal riding to most.....
    Nom de Plume:
    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
    BMW MOA #6218
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  13. #43
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    I have ridden in every season in Kansas. More than once. I even liked some of it.

    I have to say the peak of the summer season is less comfortable than the depths of winter with the exception of ICE.

    Rod

  14. #44
    2011 R1200RT ka5ysy's Avatar
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    In Louisiana we have fours seasons; Summer, Winter, Football, and Hurricane. Riding is great in all except when Hurricane gets a bit windy and wet
    Doug, 2011 R1200RT Polar Metallic
    MSF #127350 NAUI #36288

  15. #45
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2BikeMike View Post
    So you have ridden 53,600 miles on average for the last 3 years? How does one do that?
    I know the previous owner of this bike...and yes, he did. Placed first in the mileage contest two years ago...lives in Texas and rides just about everyday and everywhere.
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

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