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Thread: Standing Water

  1. #1
    aterry1067
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    Standing Water

    Hi all. I am just curious as to what the general consensus is to deal with standing water on the road. I ride a 2000 R1100RT. I personally would avoid standing water, if at all possible, but there are certainly times when it's not.

    Thanks in advance for any input.

  2. #2
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by aterry1067 View Post
    Hi all. I am just curious as to what the general consensus is to deal with standing water on the road. I ride a 2000 R1100RT. I personally would avoid standing water, if at all possible, but there are certainly times when it's not.

    Thanks in advance for any input.
    Slow down BEFORE you reach the puddle or standing water - then proceed across/thru it at a steady speed, avoiding any braking or addition of power to the rear wheel. Keep a firm grip on the handlebars, as potholes or surface debris could be hidden by the water.

    Presume some 'mushy' feel to the steering, but do not introduce any significant steering correction while in the water.

    Too slow, and you will need to add power - with reduced traction, not a good plan.

    Too fast, and you could hydroplane and lose control, as well as soak the brakes and other undercarriage components that would just as soon remain dryer - an even worse plan.

    Safe Riding.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
    Nationally Certified Law Enforcement Motor Officer (Ret.) / IBA Member #34281
    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  3. #3
    Back in the Saddle mcmxcivrs's Avatar
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    Also, if you can't tell how deep it is, its best to determine that before starting in. Make sure there isn't a bike swallowing hole in there somewhere.
    Ed Miller, Calgary, AB
    2008 K1200GT, 2009 F800GS
    I can't wait to retire and have a fixed income. The one I have now is always broke.

  4. #4
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Some experience in water;

    Know this! It does not take much standing water on pavement or dirt and its going to go over your head "as you hit it", if your speed is anything above about 25mph. This is an est. speed, but know your vision is going away if you hit water that is deeper than an inch or so. Been there done that so many times on dirt bikes, as the resulting wave of water WILL bury you in water droplets. Of course a LOT of speed tends to carry you over it all as you plane on top, so pucker up when this occurs. Both ways above will tend to improve your "butt grip" on the seat. Randy

  5. #5
    aterry1067
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    Both ways above will tend to improve your "butt grip" on the seat. Randy
    LOL. Interesting. Thanks for everyones input. The reason for my post, I just started riding a street bike a couple months ago, when I bought the RT. The other night coming home from work, I hit a large pool of water on the road in my truck. It was totally hidden in a dark area of the road, and I didnt see it until I was only feet from it. I soon began to wonder what I would have done had I been on my bike. Spilled it, most likely. I grew up on dirt bikes and quads. If I came up on water in a trail, on a dirt bike or quad, I would just unload the front end and try to twist the right grip off. I am much less inclined to do that with a top heavy 600 pound bike with all the electronic gadgetry (not to even mention how much more expensive it is to drop a street bike vs a dirt bike). That said, I have read a bit on here about an HES failure after getting wet. I am wondering if this should be a concern about riding in the rain and/or standing water?

    Thanks again for everyones input.
    Last edited by Semper_Fi; 10-03-2010 at 10:01 AM. Reason: fixed quote code

  6. #6
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    Know this! It does not take much standing water on pavement or dirt and its going to go over your head "as you hit it", if your speed is anything above about 25mph. This is an est. speed, but know your vision is going away if you hit water that is deeper than an inch or so. Been there done that so many times on dirt bikes, as the resulting wave of water WILL bury you in water droplets. Of course a LOT of speed tends to carry you over it all as you plane on top, so pucker up when this occurs. Both ways above will tend to improve your "butt grip" on the seat. Randy
    randy, you know better than this!

    you compress the forks and then blip the throttle to loft the front wheel over the water.

    this not only avoids a big splash in your eyes, it also nails your buddy with water roost.

    ian
    Go soothingly through the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.
    ________________________________________________
    '67 Trail 90 || '86 R80 G/SPD+ || '00 1150 GS || '06 HP2e

  7. #7
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Visian View Post
    this not only avoids a big splash in your eyes, it also nails your buddy with water roost.
    It also keeps any wave coming off your front tire from the air intake.

  8. #8
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    A few years ago I took a MC trip from BC across to Montana, down to Idaho, up through Washington and back home without a single "pucker moment." Not a single inconsiderate motorist or deer.

    Two miles from home I come to a stop sign where I need to make a right turn for the shortest distance home and see that what was formerly blacktop is now very flat rolled gravel. I could have turned left, added some miles, and stayed on pavement. I could also have parked the bike, walked out onto this gravel, and seen how firm it was.

    Instead, I thought "a little more dirt won't matter as I need to wash the bike anyway." I hadn't gone 10 feet when I knew I was in serious trouble. The wheels dropped in and I knew my only option was to stay on the throttle in first gear. Sweat on the faceshield also quickly eliminated the view. But I didn't drop the bike. But, no question, I was dumb.

    So to return to the OP question, best to check out how deep a puddle is on foot. Flash floods can measure in feet rather than inches in some areas, and even an inch of water is a concern and requires thought.

    As always, welcome other opinions.
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  9. #9
    angysdad
    Guest
    Same strategy applies for riding in the rain...add a third wheel!

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