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Thread: Cold weather gloves

  1. #16
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    Another advantage of the hand muff route is for those with bikes with anemic charging systems such as airheads and thumpers. On my GSPD I can save electrons I would have used to heat my hands for another purpose such as an electric jacket/vest or aux lights.
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  2. #17
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    I have Gerbing G3 gloves. They are a very warm glove even before you turn the electricity on. They have Thinsulate and a Gauntlet that keep air out of your sleeves. They are not waterproof when you get them from Gerbing; they strongly, and very specifically, tell you to treat the gloves with NikWax Gloveproof. I couldn't find any locally and had to buy it on the web from Amazon. Added a few things I needed to the order to get free shipping ($25 minimum). I have ridden in a very hard rain with the G3 gloves, and the Gloveproof really works well. By the way, I also bought NikWax "Conditioner for Leather" at the same time to try on a new pair of boots, as it is recommended for break in. Softens the leather and really sped up the break in.

    I can tell you that when you have electric gear, it really spoils you. I ride all winter, as long as there is no snow or ice on the roads, but I use the Gerbing gear all year round, whenever the temperature gets much below 65 degrees when I am on a trip. Even in the summer, if I ride at high elevation or run into a cold rain, the Gerbing goes on. I keep it in a side case when I travel. I think it keeps me safer because, for me, riding when I am cold is distracting. I used to find myself hurrying to get to my destination when I felt cold. With the Gerbing, I can relax and enjoy the ride all the way down in the 20's. That is as cold as I have ridden, it may work at even colder temps, but 23 is the lowest trip for me so far.
    Glenn
    2003 F650GS Dakar

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBeemer View Post
    Another advantage of the hand muff route is for those with bikes with anemic charging systems such as airheads and thumpers. On my GSPD I can save electrons I would have used to heat my hands for another purpose such as an electric jacket/vest or aux lights.
    Glad you brought this us. This is an important issue with heated gear. My Dakar has a 400 watt alternator, and I was concerned about draining my battery. I have heard stories about people riding on the highway all day with electric gear and arriving with a dead battery. Last winter, I hooked up a cheap temporary volt meter to monitor the situation. What I found was that if I turn on the jacket liner and gloves full, I don't have a problem. If I turn on the jacket, gloves, and pants all full at the same time, I am discharging the battery. I have the Gerbing dual controller, though, so I can manage that issue by turning down the heat. Once I realized I needed to watch my battery discharge, I mounted a Battery Bug on the bike.

    http://www.amazon.com/Argus-Analyzer.../dp/B0029VY4G4

    This was a little more cost than a simple volt meter, but it has an alarm feature that is designed specifically for heated gear. If the voltage drops below 12.1 volts for more than 20 seconds, an alarm sounds and an icon on the display flashes. So with this monitor, I don't need to watch the meter. If the alarm goes off, I can dial down the dual controller until my voltage is back up to 13v. An added bonus is the manufacturer claims that it will predict a battery failure before it happens. It does this by doing a load test every time you start the bike. It gives an estimated percentage of battery life remaining, and when that goes below 30%, it gives you an alarm every time you turn off the bike and a flashing icon on the display. So, it is hard miss. I actually had a battery fail while I was riding the bike, so this was an easy sell for me. I wasn't on a trip at the time, but it made me realize how inconvenient it would have been if I had been.

    They have a video on their web site that explains a lot of this:

    http://www.argusanalyzers.com/batter...analyzers.html

    Tip: I installed this originally by connecting it directly to the battery, as instructed. Later I read in the FAQ's on their web site that the percent remaining sticks at the lowest reading since the device was powered on. So, if you forget to put your bike on the charger and don't ride it for a few days, you may get a low reading due to the battery not being fully charged. They tell you to disconnect and reconnect the Battery Bug when this happens. So, I modified my install so that the ground wire to the Battery Bug has an in-line weather proof spade connector in a location I can reach without taking anything apart. When I get a low reading due to discharge, I can easily disconnect the Bug, wait 30 seconds and reconnect it.
    Glenn
    2003 F650GS Dakar

  4. #19
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I have Kisan Charge Guards on my GSPD and my wife's F650GS single for the same solution to the same problem. The Kisan on her bike has just stopped displaying any info. If it proves to be a fatal fault I may try the Argus.
    Kevin Huddy
    Tm Pterodactyl MT Outpost

  5. #20
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boxerkuh View Post
    3. Hippo hands: with that it looks ugly, but is very effective. You can wear thinner gloves inside them, but you don't see your controls. I hear it takes getting used to.
    Wunderlich addressed that. Clear plastic windows in the muffs so the controls are visible.. Not that I actually look after riding the bike 42k miles.. but if you need to - they are there.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by dancogan View Post
    Yup, that's the one. It's a great winter glove.
    Thanks, Dan!

  7. #22
    Registered User stkmkt1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    The Gerbings folks have told me to use waterproofing spray occasionally with the gloves.
    Mine are the new T5 series. They are supposed to be waterproof. So far, I have not had any issues with them regarding wet hands. I may try Nikwash on them just in case though. But so far, so good.
    '09 BMW 1200 GSA, 2013 BMW 700GS, 2000 Goldwing SE, '09' V Star 950, '09 Honda Rebel,
    '77 Honda 750A. Holding at six til I get new garage built - need more room for more bikes!

  8. #23
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
    Wunderlich addressed that. Clear plastic windows in the muffs so the controls are visible.. Not that I actually look after riding the bike 42k miles.. but if you need to - they are there.
    I find that my hands feel exposed and "naked" when I remove my handlebar covers. There is a sensation that there is nothing holding my hands to the bar, and they might fly off at any moment.

    If you're still looking down at your handlebars to see where your switches are, you need to spend more time riding around a parking lot until you no longer need to look down to see where your switches are.
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  9. 09-24-2010, 01:17 AM

  10. #24
    Registered User Greg_K's Avatar
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    I am really suprised than nobody has come up with a heated grip specific winter glove that has no insulation on the bottom of the fingers/palm area and insulation on the top of the fingers and back of hand. Perhaps with a inner lining that pulls heat away from the palm and spreads it through the glove.

    Less bulky than regular winter and heated gloves, yet would keep hands warm when heated grips are used.
    '04 R1150RT

    No matter where you go, there you are!

  11. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_K View Post
    I am really suprised than nobody has come up with a heated grip specific winter glove that has no insulation on the bottom of the fingers/palm area and insulation on the top of the fingers and back of hand. Perhaps with a inner lining that pulls heat away from the palm and spreads it through the glove.

    Less bulky than regular winter and heated gloves, yet would keep hands warm when heated grips are used.


    Lee Parks Deer Sports PCi are meant to do just as you describe. I plan to purchase these for use with my heated grips.
    regards,
    Mark

  12. #26
    Registered User fastdogs2's Avatar
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    Cold Weather Gloves

    BMW Pro Winter 2
    BMW R1200R
    Alpine White

  13. #27
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg_K View Post
    I am really suprised than nobody has come up with a heated grip specific winter glove that has no insulation on the bottom of the fingers/palm area and insulation on the top of the fingers and back of hand. Perhaps with a inner lining that pulls heat away from the palm and spreads it through the glove.

    Less bulky than regular winter and heated gloves, yet would keep hands warm when heated grips are used.
    Besides the Lee Parks ones - Olympia came out with a design for heated grips about 2 years ago. Unfortunately - none of their sizes quite fit my hands.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  14. #28
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by deilenberger View Post
    Besides the Lee Parks ones - Olympia came out with a design for heated grips about 2 years ago. Unfortunately - none of their sizes quite fit my hands.
    Rev'it makes a glove that has heat conducting material in the palms that transfers the warmth from the grips to the back of the hands.

    Of course, if you took the plunge and went with handlebar covers, you could wear your summer gloves year-round.

    Gloves always stay warm and dry inside handlebar covers. Trust me. I ride year-round in Seattle. Cold and wet hands are not only uncomfortable, it's also dangerous. Cold muscles don't work, and you need your hands to work when riding a motorcycle.
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
    1992 K75S sold

  15. #29
    A bozo on the bus deilenberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerImpersonator View Post
    Of course, if you took the plunge and went with handlebar covers, you could wear your summer gloves year-round.

    Gloves always stay warm and dry inside handlebar covers. Trust me. I ride year-round in Seattle. Cold and wet hands are not only uncomfortable, it's also dangerous. Cold muscles don't work, and you need your hands to work when riding a motorcycle.
    +1

    I think you might notice I suggested the Wunderlich covers someplace earlier in this thread. I have a nice set of thin gauntlet gloves that works fine down to 30F with the Wunderlich muffins.. and the control feel is still there. They also have kept my gloves dry in downpours, so as you mentioned, there is a secondary reason to try them. They do look rather funky, but this is a case of function over form.
    Don Eilenberger http://www.eilenberger.net
    Spring Lk Heights NJ NJ Shore BMW Riders New Sweden BMW Riders
    '07 R1200R (current ride) and some bimmers.. and a Porsche

  16. #30
    Proud Veteran SteveAikens's Avatar
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    I was wearing Gerbing T3's, they're waterproof and work great. I am waiting for a pair of T5's - which are also waterproof - to arrive.

    Gerbing T5 Gloves

    I've been wearing Gerbing gear - the full catastrophe of it - since some time in the 70's, upgrading as upgrades became available.

    When a line of products work - you stick with them. I've stuck with Gerbing.

    Here's a 50CC ride report - actually the equipment evaluation we did - I wrote back in Oct, 2000.

    Bare Essentials.
    Nom de Plume:
    Steve Aikens, Clovis, NM
    BMW MOA #6218
    IBA# 442

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