Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3
Results 31 to 37 of 37

Thread: long way round

  1. #31
    Registered User f14rio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    mattituck new york
    Posts
    1,037
    "Enemy fighters at 2 o'clock!...Roger, What should i do until then?"

    2010 r1200r, 2009 harley crossbones, 2008 triumph/sidecar, 1970 norton commando 750

  2. #32
    Jeff K. PlaneGeek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by tburt1969 View Post
    Over on the ADV Riders forum, apparently one of the posters went by the LWR headquarters and it appears as though they are getting ready for another trip. Long Way Up maybe in the works.
    Looks like Charley's been talking about it to the press. Hope they come through Oregon!
    Jeff K.

    Salem, OR
    2008 Silver R 1200 RT

  3. #33
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,494
    Quote Originally Posted by rms000 View Post
    Just watched the series "long way round" and was just amazed at the punishment that the bmw bikes took and kept on running. I couldn't believe they could run in such deep water. Are they that reliable?
    They would not have been my choice for that tour; certainly not the GS Adventure. But they were "free". I rolled my eyes as those actors whined for not getting their free motorcycles of choice, especially when I as an electronics tech had two GS Adventures sitting in my garage.

    You most likely did not see the amount of maintenance that they required...or the show would have been 12 episodes instead of 10.

    I met Charlie Boorman, the more clued in of the two, tech-wise. He didn't have a clue when I asked him if they used the low-octane coding plug or if they changed the transmission and final drive gear lubes after being submerged in water to the bottom of the gas tank.

  4. #34
    Registered User mistercindy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    N. Dallas 'burb
    Posts
    778
    Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed Long Way Round. Their caravan of vehicles helped make a polished film that introduced a lot of people to our little obsession.

    But, I read an interesting opinion recently in this tremendous Ride Report on ADVrider:
    http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=602168

    It was done by a guy named Walter Colebatch, who has done numerous long Siberian rides. He didn't cut down the Long Way Round effort like so many sourpusses. But he did have some very interesting comments based on his experience. Here's what he said in post #374 of that thread:

    Adding my 2 euro cents (about 2.5 US cents, or 1.7p, or about 70 kopeks) worth:

    Yes they went too early in the season - June is not the time to be in that part of the world ... but thats not the reason they didnt make it. They were smart enough to hook up with Rayil Zalyalov (the then head of the 4WD club in Yakutsk) who famously told them in the video when they asked if they can make it unaided at that time of year "I think no" ... which proved to be a spot on assessment. So the LWR team countered the wrong time of year factor by getting Rayil to accompany them all the way to Magadan, and getting Rayil to arrange several trucks to accompany them on the Old Summer Road section. That way water levels were not really a factor ... anything too deep saw them put the bikes on Rayil's trucks.

    Clearly the bikes were too big and too heavy. This obviously became a factor. Ostensibly Charlie hurt his back halfway along the road and so they put the bikes on the trucks for the hardest part ... the eastern end of the Old Summer Road.

    Personally, I dont buy it. I suspect the road was getting tougher and tougher and with the heavy bikes became a real chore. The tendency when you have an easy way out (trucks with you) and the going is tough is that you mentally crack and say 'fu@k it, stick them on the trucks.'

    Charlie's back was suddenly better exactly when the hard road finished and they unloaded the bikes to ride the main highway into Magadan.

    The advantage we had, (apart from more suitable bikes) was that there was no support trucks, so there was no easy way out. Mentally there is only one option ... to go on.

    I certainly dont think it was better riding talent. Charlie is by all accounts a very capable rider, and Ewan had a lot more training than Sherri Jo, not to mention thousands of miles of dirtroad experience by that stage.

    I often advise peoplу that the number one piece of prep you need for a tough ride, is mental ... forget riding talent, even experience you can discount. As for bikes, you can go round the world on any bike. But there is no substitute for a 'no quit' mentality. You have to be determined that nothing will stop you for the end goal, and focus only on defeating the obstacle ahead of you. If you start to think of easy ways out, then inevitably, you will use them. They needed the trucks with them because they were there too early in the year, but having the trucks with them made it too tempting ... they got tempted!
    Grant
    '05 R1200GS
    Former owner of an '03 R1150R
    BMWMOA #113847

  5. #35
    look out!!! Visian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    ATL/WNC
    Posts
    8,432
    Quote Originally Posted by mistercindy View Post
    Personally, I thoroughly enjoyed Long Way Round. Their caravan of vehicles helped make a polished film that introduced a lot of people to our little obsession.
    good post... and what's amazed me is that most everyone who sees LWR, especially non-riders, likes it a lot.

    That guy Colebatch is awesome, eh?

    ian
    Go soothingly through the grease mud, as there lurks the skid demon.
    ________________________________________________
    '67 Trail 90 || '86 R80 G/SPD+ || '00 1150 GS || '06 HP2e

  6. #36
    Lucky motorradmike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    1,211
    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    I met Charlie Boorman, the more clued in of the two, tech-wise. He didn't have a clue when I asked him if they used the low-octane coding plug or if they changed the transmission and final drive gear lubes after being submerged in water to the bottom of the gas tank.
    We watch LWR every Winter.
    I've always wondered how they got the bikes to run on crap gas. I bet BMW fixed them up for that without them knowing.
    As far as changing gear oil goes - who cares? Those bikes were junk when they got back. Where are they now?

    One last thing. I wouldn't want Claudio on my trip. Love to have a coffee with him but...
    Mike Marr
    1978 Yamaha XS750 (Needs rings), 1996 BMW R1100RS, 2004 Honda CRF230F

  7. #37
    High & Dry statdawg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    In the Endless Mountains
    Posts
    2,728
    Walt ( Colebatch )is a great man, he was spoken highly by Oison......Back2broke when he was passing through. He is a logistical guru for the part of the world and used his time and money to help fellow riders in need. When he talks of riding and individuals on the road he is spot on.

    I too, admire both the Long Way riders, they still do the ride and if you wish to get technical everyone rides supported because one has to rely on local food, fuel and interaction.
    If one cannot command attention by one's admirable qualities one can at least be a nuisance

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •