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Thread: Had a bad ride

  1. #31
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    We're at a definite disadvantage on a bike rather than inside an air-conditioned cacoon. Riding in the cool of the night and early in the morning is one tactic, but of course that puts us at risk of wild animal strikes.

    I agree that overheating is underrated as a factor in crashes. One big problem is that riders from normally cooler climates have learned that taking off clothing in hot weather is the way to cool down.

    The fact is, when ambient air temps rise above body temp, removing insulation results in the body abosorbing heat from the air rather than giving off heat. And, as the body gains temperature, lots of bad things happen, starting with cramps and ending with death.

    Out west, with low humidity, evaporative cooling works well enough. I use both an evaporative vest and an evap neck wrap. But, as noted, in some humid location such as Virginia or Missouri, a soacked swamp cooler can't give off any water to the already saturated air, so there is little or no evaporative cooling.

    There have been a few attempts to build cooling devices, including a head wrap you chill in the refrigerator, and vests you chill in icewater. The problem with those is that they soon warm up, and there is no easy way to get them cooled down again during the ride. I have yet to see any cooling garments that are practical for an all day ride in hot, humid conditions. The closest I have come is to buy a bag of ice and pack it in the front pockets of my Darien jacket. That lasts about half a tank, but can be repeated all day (at the expense of buying sacks of ice)

    I have heard of jackets or vests that circulate chilled water, but I haven't seen any in person. It would be necessary to have some sort of onboard water chiller, and of course that would compete for space and electrical power. One summer I built a cooling water gadget composed of a reservoir and a windshield washer pump. A handlebar-mounted switch powered the pump, which s prayed water onto my neck cooler. It worked, but the complexity of the reservoir, power plug, switch cord, and water line was way too much bulk. It was just a PITA.

    Maybe the smart tactic is to make short trips in the early morning in your local area when it's hot and humid--and to keep a bike somewhere else in a cooler climate for longer trips, say Seattle, Denver, or San Francisco. Yes, I know that runs against the grain of just getting on your bike and heading out any time you feel like it, regardless of the weather. But of course we already take the time for ATGATT, so it's not like we don't believe in gear.

    Is there some sort of 12V chiller available that would fit on a motorcycle? Would it be practical to power a refrigerating device with propane from a "torch" bottle? Building a vest with tubes would be simple enough, sort of the opposite of an electric vest, or even combined with electric wires. Quick detach cooler lines to the chiller. We need some inventors here!

    pmdave

  2. #32
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alzyck View Post
    Sorry to hear about your accident. Best wishes on the recovery.

    The titanium plate may let you qualify for the new TSA full palm pat downs .
    I doubt that the titanium implant will show on metal detectors. I have a shoulder full of stainless steel (I fell walking my dog, not even a good story) and it doesn't get me any special attention from the TSA.

    I asked my surgeon how is was that I got lowly stainless when my friends all got titanium and he just said it works and it's cheaper. I think I'll keep it since he went to a lot of trouble to install it and I would hate to appear ungrateful.
    BMW R bike rider, horizontally opposed to everything...

  3. #33
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmdave View Post
    Speaking for myself, when crashes and nasty injuries come my way, I try to think through what it means. As my (bicycle riding) doctor asked, "Do you think there is a message in this?"
    The message I always get from my injuries is "Pay attention!!!". (Emphasis provided by the pain receptors in my aging body). It seems like nearly everything bad that happens to me follows a lapse in judgment or alertness. The only mitigating factor is that even people who live very safe (dull) lives are gonna end up dead. I'm not yet in a hurry to cash in my chips, and I try to be careful, but if I gave up motorcycles and everything else that occasionally bites me, I wouldn't have much to live for.
    BMW R bike rider, horizontally opposed to everything...

  4. #34
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    Anyname, I highly agree with you that disasters most often are triggered by lapses in judgment.

    What Ps me Off is that I had rather hoped that with age and experience my judgment would improve.

    All the same, I just can't see myself sitting on the sidelines rocking back and forth. I need to be involved to keep my brain functioning. I can't see much point in NOT doing things as a way to avoid injury or death. You can be relaxing in the bathtub and have a heart attack, or sitting in an easy chair and get clobbered by a falling airplane.

    However, I can't ignore the risks of whatever I'm doing. I continue to hope that I'm getting smarter about that, rather than dumber--whether it's taking a bath or riding a motorcycle.

    pmdave

  5. #35
    Registered User womanridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmdave View Post
    I have heard of jackets or vests that circulate chilled water, but I haven't seen any in person. It would be necessary to have some sort of onboard water chiller, and of course that would compete for space and electrical power. One summer I built a cooling water gadget composed of a reservoir and a windshield washer pump. A handlebar-mounted switch powered the pump, which s prayed water onto my neck cooler. It worked, but the complexity of the reservoir, power plug, switch cord, and water line was way too much bulk. It was just a PITA.


    Is there some sort of 12V chiller available that would fit on a motorcycle? Would it be practical to power a refrigerating device with propane from a "torch" bottle? Building a vest with tubes would be simple enough, sort of the opposite of an electric vest, or even combined with electric wires. Quick detach cooler lines to the chiller. We need some inventors here!

    pmdave
    There'a a product called the Veskimo that I read about.
    I have a very low tolerance for heat and humidity, so I bought it.
    Google "Veskimo" if you want more info, but it's a mesh vest with tubes running all over and circulates ice water from a 9 qt cooler or 5 qt backpack unit. My friend Copilot calls it my spacesuit.
    The 9 qt has a 12 volt pump that circulates the water and I plug it into my acc. outlet on my RT. It holds a bag of ice and can last from 4 hrs to all day, depending on the temperature. The back pack unit runs on battery power within the backpack.
    It's costly but allows me to ride in 100 degree temperatures. I believe it was originally designed for race car drivers.

    My apologies to the OP for hijacking this thread.
    Last edited by womanridge; 09-07-2010 at 01:30 PM.
    Karen Jacobs
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    2012 R 1200 RT
    MOA-133005, RA32109, IBA #37923

  6. #36
    Rpbump USN RET CPO Rpbump's Avatar
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    When riding over 50 miles in hot/humid weather I use a 70oz capacity Camelback.
    Load the Camelback with 16oz of water and ice and refill when stopping for gas.
    Hope you heal quickly and find a new set of affordable wheels.

    Ride Safe

    PS. When finished taking a sip or two blow back thru the bite valve. Otherwise the fluid in the tube gets warm.

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