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Thread: cooking sets

  1. #1
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    cooking sets

    Ok,
    I purchased a Jetboil stove a few years ago but now I'm looking for a packable pot and pan cooking set that is enough to get one by. I don't want to buy the high price titanium but want good stuff without the high price tag. I'm looking for a pan, and at least one pot . Any info would be appreciated. What works for you?

  2. #2
    Pressing #1 for English! tictac's Avatar
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    I don't have Jetboil but I use Coleman Exponent Multi-Fuel Stove.
    At first, I was using simple Coleman Mess Kit, cheap
    It did work for me OK, while camping for 10 days. But, you get what you paid for.
    I am getting ready for a long trip and I was looking for a better set. This one looks pretty good and got high reviews
    http://www.amazon.com/Texsport-Black...ef=pd_sbs_sg_2

    This one is very similar to mine and the price is right.
    http://www.amazon.com/Texsport-Stain...owViewpoints=1

    Also I would like to find out more about this one.
    http://www.amazon.com/Texsport-Black...865734&sr=1-15

    I am thinking of calling the Texsport company and get the exact measurements of those two sets, it looks like they make good product.
    If you will find anything that looks good, please let us know.
    Good luck.

  3. #3
    Registered User scoobs's Avatar
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    I've been using a cookset/ spirit stove combo made by a Swedish company called "Trangia" for 30 years and it's great!! Don't know if they market in the USA but you could probably do a Google search.
    Cheers,
    Ian
    Ian Robert "Scoobs" Scobie

    '92 K75RT, '02 F650GS Dakar;
    But fondly miss.. R80RT, R45,CB250RS,DT125MX,TS100

  4. #4
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    JetBoil;

    I have the JetBoil bigger pan they sell. Works great. You can buy teflon coated frying pans at any camp store that fold up small. REI, eg...WalMart even sells these. You need "aluminum" pans for the best heat distrubution. Others do not heat evenly well, I found. The JetBoil system is hard to learn too, because it heats so fast and hot, hot,hot, which will burn your dinner all up! Turn it way down, use aluminum and take your time with this stove. It was built to boil water really fast and its good at that and can be good if you learn to cook slow with it. Randy

  5. #5
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  6. #6
    Pressing #1 for English! tictac's Avatar
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    I ordered Black Scouter cooking set from Amazon for $27.00 total.
    This set looks better than I anticipated.
    It is very lite and packs 7"X4" I would say less than 2 pounds.
    The set contains:
    1. 7" fry pan.
    1. 1qt cooking pot with lid.
    1. 1.5 qt cooking pot with lid.
    1. Mesh carry bag.

    Easy to boil water and heat up canned food.
    I did not check the fry pan yet, but I think it will work fine.

    P.S. I use Coleman Exponent multi-fuel stove.

  7. #7
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    Unless you're cooking for a group or insist on steaks in a frying pan I don't know why you NEED anything other than a single pot with a capacity of a qt or more. Of course, some simply prefer to cook like they're at home...

    The caveat is that you need to adjust your techniques to cook in the pot and minimize cleaning. For example, you can dump eggs in a plastic bag and shake, put the bag in the pot of water, cook the eggs in the bag and remove, using the water to make coffee. Saves time and fuel.

    And the old Aerostich book trick of a can of salmon in some ramen noodles can be adapted to a lot of similar things and provide plenty of calories for dinner.
    When camping around others, someone will always have a grill going you can use with a diplomatic request should you happen to have a steak or burger handy....but then you probably are also handling ice and a cooler, or risking food poisoning. (HINT- hamburger is far less safe to carry than steak - it has a much higher bacterial count to start with AND can spoil a whole lot faster)

    I carry an REI Soloist pot sans the plastic bowl and plastic spork that comes with it, use a Soto gas stove from REI and carry a separate French press cup. Only two items contribute to volume- the pot that holds the fuel and stove, plus the French press cup. Supplies are bought on the road with a quick run into a local store though I sometimes have 3 or 4 meals worth of stuff on board, plus some decent snack bars (NOT the mass market big brand crap- most of those are truly awful and an insult to good cardboard. I do better at the local yuppy-granola shop that I don't visit for much else except good Greek yogurt for breakfast smoothies when at home)

    FWIW, I weigh my isobutane gas can after every trip and subtract the tare weigh so I always know how much fuel is in it. Mark the net gas left on the can. I do this on a cheap g scale also used for weighing hops for my brewing ops. That way I know for sure WHEN I LEAVE what I need to carry in the way of fuel. Finding those cans on the road isn't always easy and I really don't want the mess or larger size of a gasoline stove on a motorcycle (I keep my Colemans as hurricane use items, however). For example, half a can (110 g net, about 258 g gross for the Snow Peak GigaPower stuff I normally use) works for me for a week rally run where I'll be doing my own decent coffee every morning plus a maybe 1 other meal a day, max.

  8. #8
    Registered User KALTZG's Avatar
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    Check out Trangia Stove and Cook sets.

    Do a Youtube search for Tranigia 27 and see a whole bunch of stuff about the Trangia cook set and stove combo. I've posted a video demonstrating the packed size of the whole deal at:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jp1YwJwFXLo

    There are bunches of these things on E-bay. Parts are also available.
    Gail Kaltz
    1997 GS

  9. #9
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Get stainless steel. It cleans more easily, doesn't scuff black like aluminum, and is usually more durable. That is reason enough, but I quit using soft aluminum for any cookwear years ago because of claimed links to some ill health effects - I forget already which ones.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  10. #10
    Registered User dancogan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    ...I quit using soft aluminum for any cookwear years ago because of claimed links to some ill health effects - I forget already which ones.
    The claimed link was to Alzheimer's, but I think that has since been disputed if not disproven. At least that's what I recall.
    Dan

  11. #11
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    Get stainless steel. It cleans more easily, doesn't scuff black like aluminum, and is usually more durable. That is reason enough, but I quit using soft aluminum for any cookwear years ago because of claimed links to some ill health effects - I forget already which ones.
    Spewed Coke on the keyboard with that one Paul.
    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  12. #12
    Registered User froggy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    I have the JetBoil bigger pan they sell. Works great. You can buy teflon coated frying pans at any camp store that fold up small. REI, eg...WalMart even sells these. You need "aluminum" pans for the best heat distrubution. Others do not heat evenly well, I found. The JetBoil system is hard to learn too, because it heats so fast and hot, hot,hot, which will burn your dinner all up! Turn it way down, use aluminum and take your time with this stove. It was built to boil water really fast and its good at that and can be good if you learn to cook slow with it. Randy
    +1 on jet boil being hot.Purchase mine with frying pan.Very intense heat spot.Check out Jetboils web site.Their pans are designed with a finned collar around underside that distributes heat more evenly,whereas regular pan will have a hot spot in middle of pan.
    We drove all this way for a DEAD END ! My son!!!

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  13. #13
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    I've been happy with an MSR Alpine 2 stainless steel cook set. The two pots nest together and there's room to store my MSR Dragonfly stove right inside the inner pot. A single lid fits both the smaller and larger pots, and can be used as a fry pan or plate. Not the lightest setup, but relatively durable and compact.

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