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Thread: Have I lost it?

  1. #16
    From MARS
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    Steve, I'm getting to the same point TandemGeek described and maybe you are too. BTDT Syndrome is what I call it. It won't be long before the bike goes and something else takes its place. But then, I've never been one to take the bike if the trip is less than an hour each way.
    Tom

  2. #17
    Registered User womanridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldhway View Post
    I deserved that, LOL.
    Karen Jacobs
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    2012 R 1200 RT
    MOA-133005, RA32109, IBA #37923

  3. #18
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    ...the sense that I'm done...TandemGeek
    That happened to me two years ago, after a near collosion with a deer, and I sold my bike.

    But I'd suggest you keep your riding gear, just in case.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  4. #19
    TANDEMGEEK
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    Quote Originally Posted by rinty View Post
    That happened to me two years ago, after a near collosion with a deer, and I sold my bike. But I'd suggest you keep your riding gear, just in case.
    You know, it would have been easier to understand if there was some type of 'life altering' event that precipitated the sudden loss of my moto-mojo, but there wasn't. It was quite strange.

    There's probably a pretty good chance I'll still have some gear left-over. Almost no one buys slightly used helmets anymore -- not that I blame them -- and I've got a lot of stuff hanging the closet which will take some time to liquidate.

    - Hein Gricke TKO Jacket & First Gear S.T.O.P. leather overpants
    - Fieldsheer Titanium mesh jacket & Sonic Air mesh pants
    - Fieldsheer Four-Season Jack and pants with liners (nearly new)
    - Fieldsheer Highlands Jacket with liner & Highlands Pants
    - Fieldsheer Highlands One-Piece with upper and lower liners
    - First Gear Rainman jacket and pants
    - First Gear / Hondaline Rainman-like jacket and pants
    - Gerbings heated liner with dual control for jacket / gloves
    - Sidi Adventure boots (2 months old)
    - AlpineStar Gortex boots

    I think at last count I had 8 or 9 pair of gloves, including 2 pair of Gerbings.... and they're all Small or X-Small. And then there's my wife's nearly new and even some brand-new gear

    - Hein Gricke TKO Jacket
    - Fieldsheer Titanium mesh jacket
    - Fieldsheer Four-Season Jack and pants with liners (nearly new)
    - Extra pair of Fieldsheer Highlands Pants with liner
    - Womens' AlpineStar / Stella Gortex boots

    It's amazing how you can amass a lot of 'stuff' over the years, noting most of this stuff has been picked up in just the last 10 years. However, here's the weird thing... and this kind of goes back to the OP's comments.

    I've always worn boots, gloves, a leather jacket and a helmet when I ride because I started off on dirt bikes. Blue jeans or khaki's were the norm, and the boots were just work boots, the gloves were always ranchers and the leather jacket was usually nice but not armored.

    I never wore 'armor' or a full-face helmet for recreational, off-track riding until about 10 years ago, but even then I didn't always wear overpants. However, in more recent years I've been AGATT with armor being the norm, and I sometimes wonder if that hadn't become almost a subliminal reinforcement of 'the hazards and risks of motorcycling'? Clearly, gear doesn't make riding more risky and it really doesn't diminish the enjoyment, but it does seem to serve as an ever-present reminder that we're trying to protect ourselves from an accident where, frankly, gear will help but only to a certain extent and under the most ideal conditions. After all, blunt force trauma to the torso or secondary impacts with large immovable or wheeled objects aren't diminished all that much by knee and elbow CE armor.

    Anyway, just something I was thinking about while driving home in my 'cage' today: driving home... man that's just something I never thought I'd say.

  5. #20
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    My thinking is that it's easy to buy bikes, but it's hard to buy gear , and you can't get much for used stuff. But in your case you could sell off a lot of equipment, and still keep a suit or two around in case your neighbour comes home with an MV Agusta F4 and offers to cut you loose on it for a few hours.

    I've been able to use my equipment a few times a year, when opportunities came up to ride interesting machines.

    It was quite strange
    I think we just go through phases. The nice thing about having a bike around, that's not being used too much, is that you probably don't have as much dough tied up in it as, say, a fun car that's only driven a few thousand miles a year. There's a lot more guilt being generated in that situation.
    Rinty

    "When you don't know where you're going, any road will get you there."

  6. #21
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    We just had another bout of snow, high winds, freezing rain, so I had to cage it again. If I am running really late sometimes I will also drive, but I make up for it by getting bulky groceries and such.
    Between the weather and the insane workload which is the norm of late, sometimes it seems better to drive anyway, as the current situation makes me a bit of a zombie in the morning.
    OTOH, even when it is in the teens, but no ice, I really would rather ride. I am more awake, alert, and in a better mood whenever I arrive at work, or anywhere else, on two wheels.
    I find the car tends to make my mind dull and lazy.
    Perhaps because I spent many years carless, it is just typical for me to use a bike for mundane things. My bikes have always had, among others, a very utilitarian aspect to them. Riding is a very normal state for me.

  7. #22
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldhway View Post
    Be nice, I am not referring to my mind (Of all the things I have lost, I miss my mind the most).

    It's a beautiful day today and I took the car to work.

    Let me explain. I live 15 minutes from my store. The temps this morning are high 30's low 40's. I just can't bring myself to take the 10 minutes to put the liner in the coat and gear up for a 15 minute ride. Coming home it would be the opposite.

    And now I feel guilty. I feel like I shouldn't let the bike sit and I shouldn't mind the hassle as long as I get some saddle time. Have I lost the spark?

    Is it just me or do others feel the same way?
    Let's look at this another way.

    It is not yet May and riding skills are as rusty as a cast iron pot left out in the snow.

    Get some practice, take your time, learn to watch for cagers that cannot see motorcyclists. Come back at the end of May and report.

  8. #23
    Midnight Rider 41077's Avatar
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    My 2 cents

    Commuting on a bike is not my idea of fun riding. Finding a quiet back road with lots of curves, now that's just good mental health care.
    I went from being a high miler 20,000 per year to 2,000 a year just by moving across the country to where good roads were out my back door not 200 miles away (Houston).
    Sometimes if you don't feel like riding DON'T, wait for that feeling to pass, it will.

  9. #24
    Rpbump USN RET CPO Rpbump's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldhway View Post
    Be nice, I am not referring to my mind (Of all the things I have lost, I miss my mind the most).

    It's a beautiful day today and I took the car to work.

    Let me explain. I live 15 minutes from my store. The temps this morning are high 30's low 40's. I just can't bring myself to take the 10 minutes to put the liner in the coat and gear up for a 15 minute ride. Coming home it would be the opposite.

    And now I feel guilty. I feel like I shouldn't let the bike sit and I shouldn't mind the hassle as long as I get some saddle time. Have I lost the spark?

    Is it just me or do others feel the same way?
    Sometimes in the FL summer heat & humidity I take the cage to work and bask in the a/c. I bought a naked bike HD Softtail just for local riding in the summer. Local trips can extend N to Savannah, W to Valdosta, and S to Orlando. I'm looking forward to the Rally in Redmond. Ride Safe

  10. #25
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    I rarely ride to work.

    My commute is about 13 miles, 9 of it on Interstate, 1 of it threading my way through an industrial-park. Most days it takes around 15 minutes. As many here have stated, the routine of putting on/taking off the gear often doesn't seem worth it for the short ride, even with the rather nice perk that I can park the bike inside the warehouse when I get there.
    Another factor that often discourages me is that I often have no idea what time I'll be going home, or how worn-out I'll feel by then. I'm a field service technician, and every day is different. Getting off at 5 is much more the exception than the rule, and I am often not home until well after dark.

    So most days the car is just plain easier, both physically and mentally. But as busy as my personal life has been lately, I'm really wishing that commuting on the bike was easier. While commuting isn't fun, at least I'd be riding more than I am.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  11. #26
    RK Ryder
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    Is 15 minutes enough time to properly heat up the bike and park it without unnecessary condensation forming in the muffler or engine? I figure if it is less than a 20 minute ride, why bother with the ATGATT as well as prematurely wearing out the machine. Could be wrong, but that's my approach. If you are driving in rush hour traffic, why not reduce your odds of being hurt and continue taking the cage? I don't think that you have lost it.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  12. #27
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the replies, it's good to know I am not alone out there.
    Steve Marquardt, 2004 R1150RT

  13. #28
    Registered User Firenailer's Avatar
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    Hey Steve,

    Relax, it happens. I think there is an ebb and flow to everything and you're not the first to lose enthusiam for riding. In our part of the country sometimes the "Combat Mentality" necessary for safe riding takes alot of the fun out of it! The population size alone just makes finding peace and enjoyment on a bike very unlikley. I've done everything from short commutes for work, to the absolute combat of a commute to Queens on the Van Wyck, Cross Bronx Exp, and the Belt Pkwy. These days unless it's very early in the morning before the cages really get cranked up I find myself taking the pick up far more often than the bike.
    I've got a couple of trips planned for the spring and summer, and I still enjoy riding, but after 40 plus years on a bikes I kind of feel the same way. I'm not selling off my gear yet, but I do find myself grabbing my fishing poles and heading out on the resevoirs alot more often!
    Ride Safe,
    Bob
    '12 R1200RT

  14. #29
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    I use to commute to work on a daily basis and I miss it; it was usually a great way to wake up in the morning. Now my "commute" is 12 paces from my back door to my studio. My yearly milage went WAY down!

  15. #30
    angysdad
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    I have 50miles of mostly slab between work and myself. I leave before 4am. Sometimes I have the urge to ride...sometimes I feel like sitting back with my tea, radio and cruise control.
    I never feel guilty, whether I'm in the wind or not. It's my decision...who would want it any other way.
    I finish early, and pick up the kids in the sidehack whenever it's nice. So even if during the pre-dawn hours I decide to '4wheel' it, I get to ride at the end of the day.
    Do whatever feels 'right'!

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