Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 28

Thread: Anybody using oil additives?

  1. #1
    El Dookey loves to ride. 99007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ada, MI (outside Grand Rapids)
    Posts
    2,045

    Question Anybody using oil additives?

    I used to put some of that real slippery stuff in my car when I was a traveling sales rep. (PTFF or what ever it is) I noticed that my gas milage improved slightly and the other part of the story which encouraged me to purchase it was that it "coated" the moving parts with this thin layer of lube so when you started the engine it was lubed even before the oil could be pumped around. I am thinking about adding some to the Rockster - especially with the year round riding effort. I did change to a cold weather viscosity.
    What do all ya'all think about these oil additives? (I am talking about the $15-$20 stuff you just put in once every 2-3 oil changes.)
    Don't winterize; Rounderize!
    www.yearroundriders.com

  2. #2
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta 'burbs
    Posts
    5,331

    Thumbs down

    Don't do it. You'll get a better return on your effort and investment by just plain changing oil when recommended. Some additives contain suspended solids that can clog filters, and I read somewhere that none are actually successful at coating anything.
    Did you carefully trach that increase in MPG? Was it repeatable enough and significant enough to justify the expense of the snake oil?
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  3. #3
    PRAY BEFORE RIDING roadcrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    ninemilefalls,wash
    Posts
    313
    how about just synthetic, once your engine is broke in, thats what i am doing, heard lots of good feedback...matthew

  4. #4
    Encumbered by employment BouncinBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Mentor, OH
    Posts
    593

    Yes I use additives

    The ones that come in the properly rated oil.
    Bouncin Bob Malehorn
    Treasurer - BMWMOA
    Mentor OH
    98 K12RS RIP
    02 K12RS
    03 R1150R Hers
    69 H1

  5. #5
    RIDERR1150GSADV
    Guest

    Smile

    Just synthetic oil is fine, after all that oil can withstand the ravages of heat vs time etc quite well. It has been working fine in all my engines for many years and lots of abuse (outboard 4 stroke especially).
    As long as you keep oil in you engine that meets or exceeds the specs of the engine manufacturer you should be fine.

  6. #6
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    983
    I'm in agreement with the others on sticking with a staight (good quality) oil. Years ago, I asked the same question of a master mechanic, and he recommended against it for the same reasons Veg mentioned. The suspended stuff that "coats" the parts can clog the tiny oil channels (if that is the right term) and actually end up working against you.
    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

    If you insist on exercising a right to burn our flag, first be so kind as to wrap yourself in it and then douse yourself with gasoline just before you strike the match.

  7. #7
    USERNAME
    Guest
    i'm an engineer, so my answer is of course, it depends.

    in a properly functioning modern engine, i'd say don't do it.

    in my (ex) VW bus, i used to run "engine restore" or some sort of blue gunk that came in a little pull tab can. when i didnt use it, my bus left a smoke trail like you wouldnt believe. you'd think spicoli or cheech and chong were in the back. and when i *did* use it, my bus did not smoke. a number of mechanics told me i had a choice, use the blue gunk or rebuild the engine. i religiously changed the oil in that engine every three months, which was about every 1000 miles, and i experimented with not adding the blue gunk. 100 miles into it, poof, im smokin'. change the oil, put in the blue gunk, im not smokin'.

    so what im *really* saying is that if you have an old engine, and you can experiment to keep it going a tad longer, for less money, some oil additives might help. youre going to end up rebuilding it, but it's nice to have a little control over when you do that.

    when i was younger, i used to use slick50 in my buick century. that had the 2.8l carbeurated motor (dude, that thing was a chick magnet in college!) and i cant say for sure that it mattered much, that car was freakin bulletproof. but i used it, and i used to *feel* better. that may have been a big rationalization on my part to justify adding 19.95 to the cost of the oil change every 50k miles. (i only used it twice...) also, i lived in rochester, NY, and definitely had my fair share of super cold starts. (5W-30 oil)

    unfortunately, my alchemy experience has been limited to automobiles.

    cliffy - would you please tell me what oil youre running in the bike now, and how you chose it? (i've got an r1150ra) im half considering a move to the north, and if i go, i'd likely join the rounders, and i wouldnt want to overly abuse my engine on cold starts. i havent done the homework on this at all, so any info youve got on choosing a lighter winter oil, especially *how* you chose, would be super helpful.

    thanks.

  8. #8
    El Dookey loves to ride. 99007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Ada, MI (outside Grand Rapids)
    Posts
    2,045
    don't you live in texas? moving north? whatsamattayou?
    sorry. on to the questions. i am currently running castrol 10w40 for the winter months. how did i choose? well, i've used castrol in past bikes and they worked. i am not too mechanical.
    on the subject of additives, when i used them in my car i consulted with a mechanic i knew and trusted. he was retired from the michigan state police and used to keep their cars on the road. he supported additives with the logic that anything that adds more lubricating properties is a good thing.
    Currently i was looking at the PTTF additives that claim to put a teflon like coating on the metal, hence cold weather starts are easier on the machine. i met a guy once (at an oil change place) who told me his car lost it's oil (freeze plug popped out) and he drove 50 miles and didn't know it because he had PTTF in the motor. I dunno. maybe i will just forget it and drive.
    Don't winterize; Rounderize!
    www.yearroundriders.com

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    63
    I have used the Teflon additives in two automoblile engines (one Japaneses, one German). Both engines ran cooler after use and temp needle gradually eased back up with miles until retreatment and then dropped back again. Both engines increased gas mileage of about 3-5% and I do track mileage. BUT I have been told these additives tend to make metal more brittle with use and both of these engines broke piston rings at about 100k. Maybe just bad luck, but neither of these engines were known for ring problems and the mileage was close on both. I will not try them again.

  10. #10
    Registered User exharleyscott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    hoffman estates il
    Posts
    49
    how about some thoughts about synthetic oils. if i change oil every 2500 miles without missing a beat what benefit do i gain. my 04 rt has just under 15k miles, if the benefits are there is the time right. any advice will help thanks

  11. #11
    Narcaleptic Insomniac TZOLK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Plymouth. Michigan
    Posts
    335

    Thumbs up

    There is always Lucas Oil Stabilizer. Its a petro product and I believe doesnt have PTFE in it. Im wondering if its a lot of ZDDP ? It doesnt say on the bottle but I think its used in nascar or other racing applications. Check it out at your local autoparts place. I do know that adding it to the gearbox makes these notchy airheads -less so

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Clarksburg, MD
    Posts
    6
    A quality oil (no over-the-counter additives) with a reasonable change interval is the way to go IMHO. I personnally run synthetic oil in all of my engines. Go to "Bobistheoilguy" (http://theoildrop.server101.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php) for more than you ever wanted to know about lubrication.

  13. #13
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,603
    Quote Originally Posted by Cliffy777
    What do all ya'all think about these oil additives?
    In the engine? NO.

    In the transmission and rear drive of my R80 GS PD and R100 GS, I use Dow Corning Lubricant M Gear Guard at 5%.

    In the rear drive of my 2003 and 2004 R1150 GS Adventure, I use Dow Corning Lubricant M Gear Guard at 5%. Both of those rear drives when drained at the 1000 km inspection had an additive in it...no question about it. The rear drive lubes came out as black as the gear lubes I mix the DC in with. Gear lubes don't turn pitch black in 1000 kms or 10,000 kms.

    BMW isn't telling us something.

  14. #14
    Narcaleptic Insomniac TZOLK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Plymouth. Michigan
    Posts
    335
    Where does one find this Dow Corning M Gear Guard?

  15. #15
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Canada and the Alps
    Posts
    3,603
    Quote Originally Posted by TZOLK
    Where does one find this Dow Corning M Gear Guard?
    Usually at a bearing supply store. Pricey, but it does make 20 US quarts of oil. Split it with other riders.

    Dow Corning Lubricant - M Gear Guard

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •