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Thread: Lifting bike onto Centerstand

  1. #31
    Registered User mistercindy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anyname View Post
    My 2005 R1200GS is a gut buster to put on the stand. I weigh 220Lbs and it takes my full weight and a strong tug to get it up on the stand.
    Agreed. I also have an '05 R12GS and, for me anyway, its a major PITA to get it on the center stand. I weigh 270 pounds, put my entire weight on the center stand, pull up and back with the left hand on the left grip, and it always takes several attempts before its finally up. And I'm talking about attempts using a fair amount of effort. I've tried putting my right hand on the right grip, on the luggage rack, or anywhere else and its never easier. I've read all the hints and directions and I think I've tried them all. I've always thought that its all technique and I just can't seem to master it, but its somehow comforting to see that somebody else has the same issue.

    BTW, I always put it up with the kickstand down. I take it off by straddling the bike with the kickstand up and shifting my weight back and forward until the bike "falls" forward and the center stand pops up. Taking it off the center stand, BTW, has never been an issue.
    Grant
    '05 R1200GS
    Former owner of an '03 R1150R
    BMWMOA #113847

  2. #32
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    My 05 GS was a chore if loaded and I was 200 lbs...they relocated/redesigned the centerstand pivots a few model years later as my 07 and now the 09 are a lot easier.

    I did add the aftermarket lifting handle on the '05 and it helped a lot,especially if the rear rack was loaded and hard to grab...for me anyways.
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  3. #33
    The Bloviator DocZ's Avatar
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    Hmmmm....

    I never thought of my R12RT as being difficult to raise onto it's center stand. Even with a dead right knee a month or so before it's long overdue replacement - just never was a problem.

    Nothing to add here re technique...that was well covered from "The Dean" on down.

    If I were you, I'd get thee to the gym and work on leg strength.
    And I NEVER have a bike in gear when I roll it off the center stand. I use the ft brake. Last time I checked, replacing pads was a bit cheaper that tranny issues.

    As for hard to get on the center stand...my old Honda ST1100...now there was a center stand pig. And to get that old porker up on that caster gizmo that I use to roll my bikes into their garage slots. Hokey Smokes, Bullwinkle! Other than that and the massive avoirdupois, what a nice bike....almost as reliable as death and taxes.

    Almost forgot....I find the R12RT to be the easiest to handle big touring bike I have ever tried...though the tallness was a real pain until i reached a decent recovery with respect to leg strength.

  4. #34
    Tame Racing Driver Stig's Avatar
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    Just thought I would post this video link that I found. I was really nervous about getting my R12RT onto its center stand when I first got it and I thought this video was helpful in demonstrating a good technique:

    YouTube Video

    After putting it up a few times, I totally agree that its mostly about using your leg muscles rather than your arms. My BMW salesman used the example of a martial artist "punching through" a solid object. Try to picture the ball of your right foot "driving through" the center stand as you push down into the floor.

    As for getting it off the center stand, I prefer to sit on the bike with the tranny in neutral, one finger on the front brake and use my left foot to push it forward off the stand. Once the bike rolls forward and the center stand is up, give the front brake a quick squeeze to keep it from rolling too much and establish your balance before putting the side stand down.

    With a little practice, it becomes much easier.
    Craig
    New York's Hudson Valley Region
    2009 R1200RT
    MOA #146131 IBA #55715

  5. #35
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    Haven't seen anyone say it but to put the bike on the centerstand be sure your bike is in neutral. You'll hurt yourself if you try it when the bike's in gear.

    I never do this, but the motorofficers do. To get the bike off the centerstand just sit on it, start her up and take off in first. Works for the officers. Dealer hates it.
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    Nancy
    '07 F650GS (Sold), 09 R1200RT, 2012 Yami FZ6R
    IBA# 37022

  6. #36
    Registered User LENRT1200ST's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by henzilla View Post
    My 05 GS was a chore if loaded and I was 200 lbs...they relocated/redesigned the centerstand pivots a few model years later as my 07 and now the 09 are a lot easier.

    I did add the aftermarket lifting handle on the '05 and it helped a lot,especially if the rear rack was loaded and hard to grab...for me anyways.
    Just an observation from a guy who has had experience hoisting both the 2006 R1200ST and my current bike a 2005 R1200GS onto their center stands.

    The ST was a breeze to put on the center stand, the GS, not so much!

    I think the ST designers did a better job of balancing the placement of the stand compared to the 2005, GS folks. Also, the ST had a nice little "hand grip" place in the left side body work to assist lifting during the maneuver. On the GS, the only workable hand hold (6 ft tall, 200 lb.) is the frame rail near the accessory outlet.

    Either bike I find it helpful to roll the bike slightly to the rear during the process.

    Len
    Last edited by lenrt1200st; 02-04-2010 at 08:03 PM.

  7. #37
    dkeast140506
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    If you have an LT

    If you have an LT read the comments above, be sure to wear stiff soled shoes and then call your wife for help.

  8. #38
    Atomic City Boxer 154048's Avatar
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    I never cared for the Reynolds Rideoff stand. Getting it on or off that thing seemed to be a pain. I can easily pop my RT up onto the stock centerstand.

    Then to get it off, I sit on the bike and do a quick bounce backward and I am off it. I do miss the solid 'on stand ' feel of the ride off tho....
    Steve in Santa Fe
    1980 R100RT
    2005 DR 650

  9. #39
    Rally Rat nytrashman's Avatar
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    the F650GS with the factory low frame option has to be the hardest bike i have owned to get on the center stand. without the jesse boxes on the bike i can do it but with the jesses on forget it. i resort to rolling the rear wheel onto a small piece of 2x4 in the garage and then it pops right up. if i park on an incline with the front wheel slightly up hill i can get the bike on the center stand with the jesses on it, but of course it does make it a bit harder to get the bike off the center stand. another trick i found is if you position the bike over a small depression in the ground that too makes it easier. i know my technique is good but i think it is a combination of my light weight (120lbs) short height/legs and the lowered bike all working against me. i have never had a problem getting the bike off the center stand, left hand holding the left grip, right hand on the grab bar by the seat, side stand up and i just pull it off the stand.

  10. #40
    Registered User texanrt's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ExGMan View Post
    +1. I tend the think of it as an elementary physics problem: 1) push the stand down to the pavement with your right foot, then rock it just a little bit to make sure both sides are touching the pavement, 2) hold left handgrip with left hand, and (depending on model) hold, handgrip (R1150RT), luggage rack (R1200RT) with right hand, and finally 3) using the handholds only to guide the motorcycle towards the rear, step down smartly (putting your entire body weight onto it)on the centerstand footpad. I weigh 228#, and my final step (#3) has to be moderated, as otherwise, I'd launch my R1200RT back, and it would fall off the stand. Don't try this barefooted...probably won't work...
    +1 Just how I do it
    Texan RT | Houston | IBA
    BMW R1200RT | HD Road Glide

  11. #41
    haughty
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    ALl excellent reasons to raise the beeg girl- El tee ..
    In my country- I have had two beeeuteefull russiun wimmen straddle bik with their muscular arms holding the bars.. I then put my beeg foot down and they peek up motorcycle..
    reall eezy to dew. und I look guid too..

    also wear shoooz..

    its a little humour.. and the answers have been good as well.

  12. #42
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Different bikes require different techniques. Every now and then BMW has actually equipped motorcycles with centerstands that work as one might assume they were intended. Most unlowered K75s are in this category: easy on easy off. At least one BMW motorcycle we have owned could best be put on the centerstand by using an overhead hoist to raise the motorcycle, swinging the centerstand down by hand and then lowering the motorcycle back to the ground. Otherwise it took two very big folks, or three smaller folks. Another went on to the centerstand quite easily, but could be pushed or pulled all around the garage trying to get it off the thing. Three people could safely get that bike off the centerstand without undue risk: one to block the centerstand from sliding forward with their foot; one to push mightily at the back of the motorcycle; and the third to keep the motorcycle from falling over after it plunged off the centerstand and bounced on its suspension.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  13. #43
    Registered User LENRT1200ST's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenrt1200st View Post
    Just an observation from a guy who has had experience hoisting both the 2006 R1200ST and my current bike a 2005 R1200GS onto their center stands.

    The ST was a breeze to put on the center stand, the GS, not so much!

    I think the ST designers did a better job of balancing the placement of the stand compared to the 2005, GS folks. Also, the ST had a nice little "hand grip" place in the left side body work to assist lifting during the maneuver. On the GS, the only workable hand hold (6 ft tall, 200 lb.) is the frame rail near the accessory outlet.

    Either bike I find it helpful to roll the bike slightly to the rear during the process.

    Len
    An added note. If you have muddy boots from off raod riding through deep sloppy mud... every effort/difficulty in placing the GS on the centerstand is trippled.

    Don't ask me how I know this!

  14. #44
    Registered User jsoque's Avatar
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    How'd you make out?

    Hey Tom,

    How'd you make out in the end?

    I agree with all of that said, for anyone with a 450 to 650 lb bike.

    Right Toe Pushing Down, definitely, is the key.

    And, take a solid hold of the frame with the right hand,
    for that back, and up, move.

    Good Luck!

    Jim
    '10 R1200RT - Ostra Grey
    '04 R1150RT - New Life in Upstate N.Y.
    '04 R1150R - New Life in Virginia

  15. #45
    bob204bc
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    All lifting techniques written here are sound but you must keep in mind that the stand was designed to be used from a specific ride height. If the bike has been LOWERED OR has SAGGING SPRINGS (which are a BMW tradition) you either shorten the stand or get stronger arms and back because you WILLbe lifting that beast.

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