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Thread: Lifting bike onto Centerstand

  1. #16
    Podzo
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    Must be personel taste

    Getting the bike off the center stand, I get on the bike and push it forward. I always feel uncomfortable standing on the side and reversing the order of putting it on the stand.
    Figure that out?!

  2. #17
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    +1 -- with the sidestand up.

  3. #18
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    After years of trial and error and more than on in-garage drop:

    Putting bike on centerstand, I'm standing on the left side of the bike with the sidestand down.

    Taking the bike off the centerstand, I'm straddling the bike with the sidestand up.

  4. #19
    Registered User Anyname's Avatar
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    My 2005 R1200GS is a gut buster to put on the stand. I weigh 220Lbs and it takes my full weight and a strong tug to get it up on the stand. Last year I rode a 2009 GS and it was much easier to put on the stand. It looked to me like the rear arm on the newer bike was longer.

    In contrast, my R80 takes no effort at all. Its really hard to believe that only 70 Lbs separates the weight of these bikes.

  5. #20
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    tho the general rule is "heavier is harder", it only accurately reflects 2 bikes that are pretty much the same model. it's more about weight distribution, height from ground, and (most critically) the position of the c-stand (fore/aft). those parameters change the dynamics of the entire operation.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  6. #21
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by MPMARTY View Post
    It's easier to put it up on the center stand than to take it off IMHO. I always make sure the side stand is down and standing on the left side of the bike with it in first gear I rock it forward and "bounce" it off the center stand. Being in gear stops its forward motion and I preload it to the left so it winds up on the side stand.
    I used to also bounce the bike off into first gear but stopped when someone told me that it was not healthy for the transmission. I started doing this after once running beside the K in a parking lot before I could stop it.

    So tell me, is there potential transmission damage to be done bouncing the bike off the centre stand with it in first gear?
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  7. #22
    Rally Rat
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    To get off the centerstand:

    Sidestand down, transmission in neutral, bars straight or slightly left, right hand over brake lever.

    Push forward, apply the brake when the bike comes off the stand, and park on the sidestand. Even without the assist (I have an '06), there is plenty of braking power.

    Works for me every time and doesn't strain my weak back.

    And as others have posted, proper technique makes it easy to put it on the centerstand (as was my 900 lb. GoldWing).

    Tom

  8. #23
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    I used to also bounce the bike off into first gear but stopped when someone told me that it was not healthy for the transmission. I started doing this after once running beside the K in a parking lot before I could stop it.

    So tell me, is there potential transmission damage to be done bouncing the bike off the centre stand with it in first gear?
    Sure -- think about it -- you're forcing the weight of the bike to rotate the rear wheel against a stopped engine, so everything in between sees a torque load (wheel, final drive gears/bearings, drive shaft, tranny output, intermediate and input shafts and bearings, clutch input splines, flywheel, crankshaft). Is it likely to immediately break anything? No. Is it healthy in the long term? Can't be.

    Easy solution: bounce the bike down with the clutch pulled in and use the front brake to stop/hold the bike.

  9. #24
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by mneblett View Post
    Easy solution: bounce the bike down with the clutch pulled in and use the front brake to stop/hold the bike.
    Thank you for reaffirming what I thought would be correct.

    However, I'm not tall or heavy enough to bounce the bike off the centre stand, and keep a grip on the brake; too far of a reach with predictable consequences, especially with the R. I'll continue with the procedure that I began back in the spring, with the bikes in neutral and bounced to a level surface to minimize the forward roll.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  10. #25
    Registered User mneblett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    However, I'm not tall or heavy enough to bounce the bike off the centre stand, and keep a grip on the brake; too far of a reach with predictable consequences, especially with the R.
    Which is why I (with 30" of inseam on a tall day) almost always straddle the bike and rock it forward off the stand. I'll usually do this with one foot closer to the ground than the other (sliding off the saddle to the side a bit), just because I like the reassurance of touching the ground with one foot as soon as possible, but that's not necessary.

    FWIW, I sometimes dispense with all of this, and keep my feet on the pegs and start driving away the instant the wheels hit the ground.

  11. #26
    RK Ryder
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    Quote Originally Posted by mneblett View Post
    Which is why I (with 30" of inseam on a tall day) almost always straddle the bike and rock it forward off the stand. I'll usually do this with one foot closer to the ground than the other (sliding off the saddle to the side a bit), just because I like the reassurance of touching the ground with one foot as soon as possible, but that's not necessary.

    FWIW, I sometimes dispense with all of this, and keep my feet on the pegs and start driving away the instant the wheels hit the ground.
    Both of the above techniques I do as well on occasion with the R, but when parked in the garage, riding off is not an option. You are very tall at 30", a good 1 1/2" than moi.

    In the beginning of owning the bikes I did use the technique of two hands on the handlebars when bouncing the bike off the centre stand but it only took one time with the bike leaning too far to the right to abandon that method.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  12. #27
    MrGrocer
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    I agree that this is all about technique.


    To put the bike on the centerstand, have the jiffy stand down. Put your right foot on the center stand peg and lower it until it touches the ground. Now, level your bike, all the while pressuring the centerstand, You should feel when the bike is level and both legs of the center stand are on the ground.

    Now at this point your right foot should be on the centerstand and both centerstand pegs should be on the ground. Your right hand should be steadying the bike by grasping the bag mount or the OEM side of the bike, your other hand on the handlebar. Now without using pressure from either hand. just put all your weight on the center stand peg. The bike will pop right up.

    To get it off. With the jiffy stand down (I know this isn't the proper way but its how I do it.) grasp the handlebar, turn it Left, grasp the rear of the bike and just gently 1, 2, 3, rock the bike off the stand, it should slowly come to rest on the jiffy stand,

  13. #28
    On the Road
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    Thanks for all the valuable help. I will try the suggestions this weekend. Someone will stand-by to catch the bike if I drop it.

  14. #29
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    realize that there are 2 potential problems that can result from taking the bike off the c-stand with the sidestand down.
    1)- if sidestand hits hard, it can damage stand or mounting point.
    2)- if sidestand hits hard, it can bounce bike to right side, away from you, and your ability to keep it upright.

    if you have the arm length for it, go with both hands on bars, and use the front brake to steady bike after its back on the wheels.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  15. #30
    BMW MOA co-founder bmwdean's Avatar
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    Putting an R1100RT, R1150RT, or R1200RT on the center stand is a piece of cake. Steady the thing, press down on the center stand, and pull it up with the handle. It is beautifully balanced and comes right up.

    If you want a real challenge, but a 1950s R51/3 or R67/3 in its center stand! Now THAT is a challenge even though it weighs 250 pounds less.
    Jeff Dean − Tucson, Arizona − BMW MOA Co-founder (1972)
    http://bmwdean.com/2014-r1200rt.htm − MSF Chief Instructor (1994)
    Friend of the Marque (1999) − Prof. Gerhard Knochlein BMW Classic Award (2013)
    2014 & 2007 R1200RTs, R60/2s, R67/3, R51/3 ↔ 1949 R24

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