Results 1 to 15 of 30

Thread: 1965-R69S What' it worth?

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    21

    1965-R69S What' it worth?

    I have a chance to purchase an R69S with roughly 20k miles. It hasn't been started in maybe 15 years. Gas tank and carbs are varnished bad. No back tire. Damper assembly for the front end is missing. Has Volkswagen mufflers. Headlight assembly is bent from crash. Speedo has plastic cover w/ no chrome ring. It does have some kind of fiberglass bags. The frame is pretty rusty back by the battery. The engine is not stuck but I can crank it over by hand. It belongs to a widow and I don't know how much to offer her for it. I want to be fair.

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    413
    In 1990, I bought a '67 R60/2 in similar condition, except running. In addition to the aftermarket mufflers, it had ape hangers and the seat had been recovered by some automotive shop. I paid $1500. As you probably know, /2 parts are expensy.

  3. #3
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Surf City, USA (Santa Cruz, CA)
    Posts
    4,515
    Most parts are all available, and while some might think they're expensive, they're no more expensive than you'd expect to pay for new parts for your modern BMW. For example, I bought a new rear fender for my 1953 R51/3 from BMW and got it for $600 in primer.

    Prices for a fully restored R69S can breach $20k. But prices fall of quickly as the condition declines.

    There has long been a rule of thumb about these bikes: $5k to buy, $5k to mechanically restore and $5k to cosmetically restore. Those numbers are out of date.

    Possible problem areas can include:
    • The magneto coil: while the magneto arrangement is robust, the windings in the coil are insulated with shellac, which breaks down over time, regardless of usage. Magnetos are not common and few know how to diagnose them. Repros and rewound coils are available.
    • Soft or "butterheads": in the mid 60s, the firm that was casting the blanks for BMW's heads changed the alloy, apparently to reduce air pollution emissions, without telling BMW. These heads, which are indistinguishable from others, can deform in use, trapping the through bolts that mount it to the cylinders, losing spark plug inserts and allowing the stanchions that the rockers mount on to sink, running out of adjustment room.
    • Bottom end wear: the cranks are built up with captured one piece conrods and big end roller bearings. If this area is worn, it requires pushing the crank apart, refreshing everything, pushing it together again, and getting it perfectly trued. There are only a very few people who can do this service. This can be exacerbated by...
    • Slinger cleaning. There's no oil filter in these engines comparable to what we're used to. A low volume pump directs oil to the crank main bearings; when the oil exits on the inside face of these bearings, it drops into a sheet metal disk with a cupped outer lip -- a slinger. The oil is then directed into the hollow crank pins and dribbles out into the conrod big end bearings. These slingers fill up with wear and crud, and then the bearings stop getting oil. The bottom end of the motor must be disassembled to inspect and clean these slingers.
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
    http://darryl.crafty-fox.com

  4. #4
    Life Member SCJACK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Upstate South Carolina
    Posts
    245
    By your description, I would say that it's really not worth more than $1000. I would make a list of everything that you know it needs and add up the prices before taking on this project. I completely restored one of these around 15 years ago and it wasn't cheap then. I think that at today's prices, you would spend a minimum of $7-$8k to mechanically restore and $5-$6k to cosmetically restore (and I may be low). The old /2's were beautiful machines to look at but I sold mine to someone who wanted to fool with the quirks of a /2. Personally, I enjoy owning and maintaining the 1981-1985 airheads due to the improvements that were made by the factory by this time and the ease of overall maintenance. Good luck with your decision.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Fillmore, California
    Posts
    1,016
    Quote Originally Posted by scjack View Post
    By your description, I would say that it's really not worth more than $1000.
    If it doesn't have a title, it's not even worth that...depending upon what state you are in, it can be a living hell trying to get it titled...in many states, you've got to bring it back to full running condition before it can be inspected and the VIN verified...and if something happens that it can't be registered, you've just poured all that money down the tubes that you have spent to get it to that condition... Ergo, a total pig in a poke...no title, worth no more than 500 bux, maybe less, in my opinion...

  6. #6
    Scraper JohnW67's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    101

    For what it's worth...

    Here's a link to a '69 R60/2. I saw this one in person. Needs a lof cosmetic work, but runs nice. The dealer sells quality bikes that have been worked over mechanically.

    http://www.re-psycle.com/pre_owned_list.asp
    John Woods
    1976 R60/6

  7. #7
    Airhead #85 mymindsok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    65 Mi North of Frisco
    Posts
    719
    Quote Originally Posted by Yarddog View Post
    If it doesn't have a title, it's not even worth that...depending upon what state you are in, it can be a living hell trying to get it titled...in many states, you've got to bring it back to full running condition before it can be inspected and the VIN verified...and if something happens that it can't be registered, you've just poured all that money down the tubes that you have spent to get it to that condition... Ergo, a total pig in a poke...no title, worth no more than 500 bux, maybe less, in my opinion...
    Hi Dog!

    You're right about that rule for getting a title in Cali but....

    After getting a couple of bikes "bimbo bikes" titled up here, I got to know the CHP officer who commands the inspection station and he has been nice enough to run some registration numbers for me, before I start in on a new project.

    That doesn't get me a title up-front but it does let me sleep at night, while the build gos on and next week I can get the finished bike inspected, confident that by the afternoon, I'll be driving home with a title and a license plate, rather than an empty pick-up truck and a sob story!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •