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Thread: Maintenance in the cold

  1. #1
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    Maintenance in the cold

    My 12000 mile is due. I'm looking at doing the work myself (first timer) in my unheated Wisconsin garage. Will 35 degree temps mess up critical things like setting valves or the TB sync?

    Thanx
    Dean Stuckmann - Wisconsin
    2008 BMW R1200RT
    1982 Honda cx500 Turbo
    1983 Honda cx650 Turbo

  2. #2
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    The metal won't care. Now your frigid fingers might mess up some, but the metal won't care. We see a big difference between 35 degrees and 60 degrees but in the scheme of expansion and contraction and molecular motion the metal doesn't care.

    Rubber gaskets do seem to get a bit cranky. Keep them warm.

    Now 50 below - the metal starts to care.
    Last edited by PGlaves; 11-30-2009 at 07:41 PM.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  3. #3
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    My wife got me a heater for the garage - I have done service work in it during the winter.

    Doable (not my favorite) just keep an eye on the flamables versus the location of the heater.
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
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  4. #4
    concrete expressionist Crow18's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dstuckmann View Post
    My 12000 mile is due. I'm looking at doing the work myself (first timer) in my unheated Wisconsin garage. Will 35 degree temps mess up critical things like setting valves or the TB sync?

    Thanx
    If it's below freezing and somebody offers you a dollar to put your tongue on the cold cylinder head, don't do it.

    I mean, at least hold out for $5.
    -Eric
    '87 K75T, '07 F650GS

  5. #5
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crow18 View Post
    If it's below freezing and somebody offers you a dollar to put your tongue on the cold cylinder head, don't do it.

    I mean, at least hold out for $5.

    Or if they double dog dare you - it's over
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
    2009 G450X White
    IBA #35651
    Rogue Moderator

  6. #6
    Midnight Rider 41077's Avatar
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    Get a Heater

    +1 on the heater and something to insulate you from the cold floor.

  7. #7
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Semper_Fi View Post
    My wife got me a heater for the garage - I have done service work in it during the winter.

    Doable (not my favorite) just keep an eye on the flamables versus the location of the heater.
    I have a Ker-o-Sun heater for early morning cool days in my shop...I just know to NOT mess with flammables on those days or kill the heater...saw that happen once when I was a youngin' and the guys next door were painting a car with laquer near the gas water heater Stuck with me forever!
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  8. #8
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    I have a large heated garage that I keep at 55 degrees when I'm not in it and 68 degrees when I'm working. I have to keep it heated because we have a water holding tank in the garage. I actually spend more $ on oil to heat the garage than I do to heat my house because I run a wood stove in the house 24/7 in the Alaska winter.

    I do have experience working on snogos in -60 degree temps. Got caught out in a cabin by a sudden temperature drop. Was able to get two of 4 machines running. Broke a drive belt just by leaning on it a bit. Nothing works as designed at -60.
    Kevin Huddy
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  9. #9
    100,000+ miler 32232's Avatar
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    A cheap and easy way to stay warm is to put an IR heat lamp above the workbench. Tools and parts laid out are warm to the touch, and insulated coveralls look after the rest of me.
    Dave

    '06 Triumph Scrambler (Trans-Labrador veteran)

  10. #10
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    Exclamation Heater

    Maybe you know this,
    but just in case,
    if you use one of those blower heaters that burn kerosene
    like farmers use alot,
    don't use it in a closed garage.
    They were called Kipco or Nipco or something like that.
    The fumes will get you.
    They can produce a lot of heat, but they might kill you.
    They are good for blowing on equipment to heat it up.
    Also, you can get a headache even from short exposure
    in a closed garage,
    Be careful.
    Phil
    2004 K1200GT
    1996 K1100RS
    2000 HD Road King

  11. #11
    John. jstrube's Avatar
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    I've got one of those, I always leave the door open about a foot to compensate.

  12. #12
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    Don't try to use a charcoal grill as a heater either. Basically a carbon monoxide generator.

  13. #13
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    heater

    The wife just got me an infa-red Heatwise at our local Oreck dealer. Down to 20 degrees last nite, worked this afternooon on the Rockster, at a BALMY 70 degrees, should have done this years ago.

  14. #14
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    Take a look at an overhead electric heater-there are all sizes/kinds out there. A good place to start is an electrical supply house where they know what does what & before you talk to them you will need to know what the power available in the garage offers you, as in how many amps service. Kerosene is a terrible choice-$$$,bulky/messy and you can buy an electric heater for less!

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