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Thread: tent question

  1. #31
    Rpbump USN RET CPO Rpbump's Avatar
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    I like my Catoma Switchback but am considering a tent I can standup in like the Redverz Series II Expedition tent. It packs smaller than the Catoma and has more room.
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  2. #32
    Out There Somewhere bmwrider88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gunderwood View Post
    The best tent I've ever used/owned is a Hilleberg Keron 4GT. Their whole product line is incredible and highly respected among the more adventurous/remote backpackers/travelers. That particular tent is fairly easy to set up with two people, but it would be too much for just one person. I want to get/try out one of their smaller tents.

    If you ever have been caught on top of a mountain in a serious thunderstorm (50+MPH gusts), you want one of these!

    http://www.hilleberg.com/usa.htm

    Edit: Unlike most manufacturers, they don't cheat on specs either. You get exactly what they advertise. Then again, for what they charge you'd better!
    WOW!
    those are virtually the same as several brands of tents i saw over in the UK & Isle of Man- where it rains a LOT. underhung & tunnel shaped, with HUGE vestibules- big enough to park a [smaller/vintage] bike in, or hang out in for the day if it's raining cats & dogs. sweet! but boy they don't give those away.

    IMO a tent should hold up and keep you dry no matter the weather. i've owned tents by The North Face, and Marmot that were fantastic and filled the bill plenty well. +1 on having a *FULL coverage fly* (one that goes all the way to the ground). a lightweight ground cover cut to the size & shape of the tent's footprint helps withstand the weather, too. as someone mentioned already, tent usages are so subjective, you really must take a hard look at what your primary demands for personal shelter are going to be. i found that no one tent really covers all my needs. to add versatility, i also have a Parawing... which adds both bulk & weight to a M/C pack job... but adds a lot in certain situations, like heavy rain, or excessive sun (read- it was GREAT at Bloomsburg)

    for some deep discounts on great outdoor products, remember

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  3. #33
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Another maker of great (but not cheap) tents is Exped. I'm quite happy with my Venus II. The body of the tent is suspended from the rain fly. The poles slide into the fly. Set up and tear down are a breeze, rain or dry. The vestibules are medium in size... plenty large for gear but not big enough to sit in. Since I also carry a 12x12 tarp it is a non-issue for me.



    More than anyone could care to know about this particular tent at http://www.snafu.org/pics/exped-tent/

  4. #34
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    We spend anywhere between 100 and 120 nights a year in our tent. It doesn't leak. It is well vented. It has poles that go through sleeves. It doesn't blow over or down, and the poles don't break in the wind. It is tall enough to stand up in. It is called a 4 person tent so has room for us and our stuff, all out of the weather. So far it lasted two seasons - at least 200 put-ups and take-downs. It has been set up on rocks, in gravel, on concrete, in grass and in sand. It doesn't really show signs of wear but I found another - same place, same sale price, and bought another just like it.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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  5. #35
    Registered User stanley83's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PGlaves View Post
    We spend anywhere between 100 and 120 nights a year in our tent. It doesn't leak. It is well vented....
    Make, model, source?

    Thanks
    Justin in Somerville, MA
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  6. #36
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stanley83 View Post
    Make, model, source?

    Thanks
    It is a Texport brand, Cool Canyon model, 8x10 square dome tent. I bought ours at an Alco store. They are available several places.

    Do a Google search on Texport Cool Canyon Tent

    or

    See: http://www.amazon.com/Texsport-Canyo.../dp/B003IKB6MA
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  7. #37
    Out There Somewhere bmwrider88's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marchyman View Post
    Another maker of great (but not cheap) tents is Exped. I'm quite happy with my Venus II. The body of the tent is suspended from the rain fly. The poles slide into the fly. Set up and tear down are a breeze, rain or dry. The vestibules are medium in size... plenty large for gear but not big enough to sit in. Since I also carry a 12x12 tarp it is a non-issue for me.



    More than anyone could care to know about this particular tent at http://www.snafu.org/pics/exped-tent/
    your Kelty tarp is very similar to my MSR Parawing, only the Kelty is made of lighter weight material, and appears smaller than the 19' 'Wing. how well does it do under heavy rain conditions? the Parawing does really well in hard rain but for the money (mucho $$$) you'd expect it to be amazing no matter what.

    one of the things i consider to be a sort of bogus selling point used by tent manufacturers is their description of how fast their tent will set up. i can't think of a single time in all my decades of camping where it was imperative that i set up my tent in under 3 minutes or whatever. maybe on Everest or someplace similar it could really matter? short of that, no biggie.

    i'm not opposed to dropping a big fat dime on a tent just to know it will serve me reliably under the most adverse of conditions. however, it constantly surprises me how well many folks do with el cheapo tents! maybe it's just me but i've camped in some really stupidly bad weather... my philosophy has always been to go no matter what. a good tent and a good tarp should withstand anything short of a tornado.

  8. #38
    BMW MOV Club Director ENFOMAN's Avatar
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    Great discussions here

    Not Having tented since way back and then trying Mr. Sherpa in Bloomsburg, I liked the Idea of the no fuss and muss of set up and take down but, was not too keen on getting up and down from the ground. I was wondering the opinions of those who have used Kamp rite cot tents for those who may be challenged after a day of riding. This seems to be the best of both worlds of tenting being off of the ground for us "older guys" and tall enough to be comfortable while in the tent. With a 8 x 8 x 38 packed size and 15 pounds, it seems to be on the max end of solo riding stowage but seems fine for hack use.



    http://www.meijer.com/s/kamp-rite-co...7#ReviewHeader

  9. #39
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwrider88 View Post
    your Kelty tarp is very similar to my MSR Parawing, only the Kelty is made of lighter weight material, and appears smaller than the 19' 'Wing. how well does it do under heavy rain conditions? the Parawing does really well in hard rain but for the money (mucho $$$) you'd expect it to be amazing no matter what.
    The 12x12 tarp is only a few years old and I've not yet had to use it in a hard rain. It works great for shade and in a light rain. It doesn't work very well in the wind when staked out in soft sand.

    Quote Originally Posted by bmwrider88 View Post
    one of the things i consider to be a sort of bogus selling point used by tent manufacturers is their description of how fast their tent will set up. i can't think of a single time in all my decades of camping where it was imperative that i set up my tent in under 3 minutes or whatever. maybe on Everest or someplace similar it could really matter? short of that, no biggie.
    It's not so much the time savings; but the one less step. I stuff the poles through the sleeves then position the tent just right, finally pounding pegs. No additional step of adding a rain fly. That is very nice when trying to pitch a tent in the rain. I'd guess that the entire process takes me 10-15 minutes. What I really enjoy is the speed of tear down. That speed comes mainly from the shape of the "burrito bag" sack that holds the tent.

  10. #40
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Rei

    REI tents are perfect in one respect: No matter how or why it breaks, REI will ALWAYS either return your money, replace the defective product, or exchange an unwanted model for a more appropriate model. No questions asked. Period.

    I currently own four tents.

    I have a 16 year old The North Face two-man tent that my wife and I used while backpacking before our son was born. It's still perfect for solo touring, as it weighs nothing and takes up no space.

    I have an old REI four man "Camp Dome" tent that while worn and tired, still works great for when we take grandmas car camping with us.

    I have a Mountain Hardware "Trango 3.1" four season mountaineering tent that has seen some seriously hairy adventures on alpine expeditions in the Cascade Mountains, including spending a couple of nights at 12,500' on Mt. Rainier. I take this tent on most of my moto-camping adventures, as I like having all the extra room inside for storing my helmet, Roadcrafter suit, etc. I can keep my hard cases inside the tent instead of locked to the bike, which adds to the convenience factor.

    Last year, we added a REI Base Camp 6 to the shelves in the garage. We've been using this tent for our family week-long stays at music festivals. Were I looking exclusively for a 3-man tent for moto-camping, I'd pick up the REI Mountain 3 tent. http://www.rei.com/product/739349/rei-mountain-3-tent

    The tent is aerodynamic, meaning it won't blow over in windy conditions. It's light and packs down small. And, like all REI products, it's guaranteed for life.

    Here's how I transport my tent:


    The roll on the top of my radio box is my Therma-Rest "Dreamtime" sleeping pad. At home, I'll unroll the sleeping pad out on the floor, lay the tent body, groundsheet, and fly on the pad, use the tent poles as a spindle and then roll the whole thing up into the "bedding burrito" that sits on top of the bike. When I get to camp, I take the entire burrito off the bike, plop it on the ground, and unroll and then set-up my tent and mattress. When it's time to pack up, I'll put the mattress on top of a picnic table or on the grass and put the tent body, groundsheet, and fly on top of the mattress, roll it all up once again, strap it to the bike, and I'm off to the next destination.

    I highly recommend this procedure if you have the place to strap a "bedroll" across your bike - like across a rear seat or rear rack if you have the options.
    Seattle, WA
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  11. #41
    Registered User 119240's Avatar
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    My son & I got a Exped Venus III for 2 people with gear, exped down mat,and Exped Water bloc down bag - we love Exped gear
    '91 K75S, '06 K1200S
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  12. #42
    Registered User bmwgsrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerImpersonator View Post
    Here's how I transport my tent:


    The roll on the top of my radio box is my Therma-Rest "Dreamtime" sleeping pad. At home, I'll unroll the sleeping pad out on the floor, lay the tent body, groundsheet, and fly on the pad, use the tent poles as a spindle and then roll the whole thing up into the "bedding burrito" that sits on top of the bike. When I get to camp, I take the entire burrito off the bike, plop it on the ground, and unroll and then set-up my tent and mattress. When it's time to pack up, I'll put the mattress on top of a picnic table or on the grass and put the tent body, groundsheet, and fly on top of the mattress, roll it all up once again, strap it to the bike, and I'm off to the next destination.

    I highly recommend this procedure if you have the place to strap a "bedroll" across your bike - like across a rear seat or rear rack if you have the options.
    What happens when you are riding in rain...doesn't your tent and bed roll get wet? I like the idea but wondering about riding in the rain.

    I had a REI 4 man half dome tent... I loved it. I lost it in a fire back in 06' I never knew REI guaranteed their product for life. I guess it wouldn't be guaranteed if lost due to fire though. I got an MSR tent but wish I went back with REI. I am not saying I don't like the MSR tent... REI was nice and quick to put up but they had changed the design on the half dome since.
    Bye bye 2006 F650 GS for a 2011 F650 GS.

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