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Thread: The big renovation: 1908 home

  1. #151
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Question:
    How long will Scott be sitting in the permit office with his revised engineering?

    Answer:
    Quote Originally Posted by BubbaZanetti View Post
    scott conary - BMW... err...umm... bikes are dangerous
    portland, oregon
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  2. #152
    Rally Rat Sue's Avatar
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    The Money Pit

    Quote Originally Posted by knary View Post
    "two weeks"?
    The Quote is from the hilarious movie, "The Money Pit."
    Several times in the movie, the construction crews answer "Two Weeks, Man" ... when they are asked how long a job will take.

    It's worth renting.

    Sue Rihn #43753
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    Sometimes it's the bend in the road that makes life worth the ride.

  3. #153
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Make that three weeks.


    Anyone bored enough to think about a few things with me?

    Lighting:
    I'm putting in can lights throughout the house. The finished ceiling height will be around 9' 3"+. Five inch cans or ? Any preference on the baffle/trim? It's an old house and some find recessed lighting too modern, but I don't think you can beat them for function in conjunction with some lamps.
    scott conary - BMW... err...umm... bikes are dangerous
    portland, oregon
    www.scottconary.com | new paintings

  4. #154
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sue View Post
    The Quote is from the hilarious movie, "The Money Pit."
    Several times in the movie, the construction crews answer "Two Weeks, Man" ... when they are asked how long a job will take.

    It's worth renting.
    AH!
    I know the movie, but forgot the reference. I thought Dave was giving an even harder poke in reference to the timeline the contractor's originally gave - three weeks. With the big downpours and the concrete oops, we hit 4 1/2 weeks. And then I asked them to tackle a few more things which has them still on site now five weeks after the initial start. I am very ready for them to be done.
    scott conary - BMW... err...umm... bikes are dangerous
    portland, oregon
    www.scottconary.com | new paintings

  5. #155
    BUBBAZANETTI
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sue View Post
    The Quote is from the hilarious movie, "The Money Pit."
    Several times in the movie, the construction crews answer "Two Weeks, Man" ... when they are asked how long a job will take.


    or, you know, TOTAL RECALL


  6. #156
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    I could go for a little depressurization right about now.
    scott conary - BMW... err...umm... bikes are dangerous
    portland, oregon
    www.scottconary.com | new paintings

  7. #157
    JIMMYC
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    Lighting

    We did an addition 15 years ago and went nuts with recessed cans, track lighting and hanging lamps with floods. It was what the designer spected .The thing I don't like is the bulbs are expencive and they consume a lot of energy. They also cover a limited amount of area. Because the pattern is cone shaped walls will be dark higher up.

    It is worth finding a high quality lighting supply house and spending some time getting an idea of what the other options are. They sometimes will work with you on price if you're buying everthing from them. I like the places that have a showroom and a supply section for professionals.

    There is some really neat LED lamps and low voltage lamps. The initial cost is somewhat high though.

  8. #158
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Use the cans for spot lighting on the walls. Good lamps will include lenses that can be used to create specific patterns of light on the wall.

    Alternatively, cans can be used for task lighting, such as over a countertop or island instead of the trendier/more expensive pendants.

    Use stand alone lamps for general illumination.

    http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library...res-A1583.html
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  9. #159
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    Go Big!

    Hey Knary, GO BIG or Light a candle. The older you get the more light You will need! (+ 30%) You can never have too much light, and if you do... Dim it!!!! If you can hook up with a lighting designer at your local lighting store. Remember to take into consideration the color of you walls and ceilings as they can play a big factor in what will be reflected. Talk with your Electrician the usually have a pretty reasonable source and can point you in the right direction.

    Bill

  10. #160
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 5thgen View Post
    Hey Knary, GO BIG or Light a candle. The older you get the more light You will need! (+ 30%) You can never have too much light, and if you do... Dim it!!!! If you can hook up with a lighting designer at your local lighting store. Remember to take into consideration the color of you walls and ceilings as they can play a big factor in what will be reflected. Talk with your Electrician the usually have a pretty reasonable source and can point you in the right direction.

    Bill
    agree. When we were doing the lighting part of our project similar to this one, the Naysayers joked about our obsessing over lights, dimmers and colors. Now they come in and are impressed with the 'mood control' that we have in each room. Lots of imagining but worth it in the end. When things are all torn apart and the electrician is running wires it seems obvious to do it then. Over do it we say! We still use candles too. BTY, while the electrician is there put in more plugs than you think you'll need. - Bob
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
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  11. #161
    Rally Rat Sue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tourunigo View Post
    BTY, while the electrician is there put in more plugs than you think you'll need. - Bob
    10-4 on that one.

    I always wished I would have put in under-counter lighting ... and outlets under the counters ... in the kitchen at Beemer Hill. Outlets underneath the counters are out of sight and so convenient.

    Really enjoying this thread!

    Sue Rihn #43753
    BMW MOA Director - Ambassador
    Sometimes it's the bend in the road that makes life worth the ride.

  12. #162
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    Check out Lightolier 3" cans # 2000IC housing with a 2005 WH trim. This trim uses a 50 PAR 20 lamp which provides a nice white crisp light and no transformer to have to replace later. For accent this housing will accept Lightolier #2027, this trim has an adjustable lamp angle up to 30 degrees. When the the lamp is adjusted straight down it looks just like the 2005 trim so your look will be uniform as far as trim and lamp look. The three inch cans look less obtrusive and provide good light when compared to the 5" and 6". The 6" to me look like hub caps screwed to the ceiling. But thats just me.

    As far as receptacles the NEC, if they use that in your state, is very clear and if wired to code you will have plenty of receptacles usually. On general wall space you can not be more than 6' from a receptacle. IE start your measurement at an opening, a door etc., and the first receptacle need to be within 6', the next receptacle on linear wall can be 12' from the first one. So if you are stand between receptacles you are not more than 6' from. Locally we go a little more heavy than that (more receptacles) but code is usually sufficient. If you have a specific locations for funiture or book shelves or computer etc. make sure you have power where you will want it. On countertops you can't be more than 2' from a receptacle. Start at a sink or break in the counter top and you need a receptacle within 2'. After that 4' apart. We go a little heavy there too. The big thing is that more circuits than code requires is very desirable. We usually only put two kitchen counter receptacles on a circuit. Code says you can put the entire kitchen and dining room on just two small appliance branch circuits. Get more circuits than that! Make sure your ref., dishwasher, and other appliances are on their own individual branch circuits.

    In regard to lighting there are lots of options and ideas it usually the limiting factor is "how much do you want to spend". Check around and find a look you like and go from there. You can go from a table lamp in the corner to computer controlled lighting systems with lots of options in the middle. How thick is the wallet? And yes to dimmers they are inexpensive.

    Have fun.
    Last edited by GSfornow; 11-26-2009 at 03:45 PM.
    "We're driving fast from a dream of the past to a brave new world" - Steve Miller Band

  13. #163
    Registered User tourunigo's Avatar
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    dimmers don't work with those pesky little pretzel-like florescent lights. Halogen are hot but so controlable and fit into tight places. Likely many more options on the market but halogen and the good old Edison thing work for us.

    Re: plugs. We are set at about 4-6 feet. Living room had the closest fit with a little cluster of three behind the future entertainment unit (pellet stove, tv, stereo, light).

    I agree.... great little thread and, if you look at it all from another perspective, lovingly restructuring a fine old house is a bit like working on an old /5 that you just found in a barn - Bob
    saltyfogriders@gmail.com
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  14. #164
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    There are CFL lamps that are dimable for retro fit into a 120 volt fixture you would need to change your dimmer though. In new construction I think the smart choice is to commit to fluoresent or incandescent at this point. At least as far as recessed lighting is concerned. There are many options available in fluorescent and incandescent models. Fluorescent fixtures are available that are dimable but at a higher cost. The color rendering of the fluorescent lamps are getting better but the lamps for recessed lighting the choice is limited. I looked at recessed the other day for an office and the 16 or 26 watt lamps available for those were either 2700 K or 3500 K. The 2700 K having a warmer look and a CRI of 82 but the CRI for the 3500 K would be higher (colors would look more natural). While the fluorescent are less expensive to run, in my area they are not in widespread use in residential applications. In commercial applications the fluorescent are more the norm. Most go with halogen, PAR lamps, or straight incandescent, R lamps, for residential use.
    Last edited by GSfornow; 11-26-2009 at 09:30 PM.
    "We're driving fast from a dream of the past to a brave new world" - Steve Miller Band

  15. #165
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    As I'm the electrician* on this project, I can do whatever I want with little fuss - just more and more questions.

    I'll be putting in as many plugs as I can manage without making it seem like a physics lab, with doubled up outlets in more than a few spots. These days, as we all know, there's that much more to plug in. A single box next to the bed doesn't come close to being enough these days between lamp, clock, reading light, and the occasional laptop.

    I did a fair amount of research on lighting when I built the studio a few years ago. The formula for us is color correctness, temperature and price. If a bulb's CRI is too low, I won't buy it.

    There are two excellent lighting stores in the area with designers eager to help. I'm pricing the recessed lights, porch lights, accent lights, bathroom lights, lights and more lights right now.


    Most importantly, I did manage to get out of the permit office with approved engineering changes after 3 1/2 hours. The city's engineer was very unhappy about having to put a triangle with a 3 in it on the plans. You'd have thought I'd asked him to eat poo.

    *my father arrives on wednesday to lend a hand. He's going to play with plumbing while I pull wires.
    scott conary - BMW... err...umm... bikes are dangerous
    portland, oregon
    www.scottconary.com | new paintings

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