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Thread: Finding Who I Am Not Could Be

  1. #1
    HALLIE365
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    Smile Finding Who I Am Not Could Be

    I have always ridden solo, been called the Lone Ranger more than once and am independant as can be, good and bad. I struggle with asking for help when something is wrong with the bike or if I think I am doing something wrong. When I was learning how to ride I knew everything so I thought, not so, just pig headed. Now, I still ride solo, but with more common sense. I watch out all the time on the road for crazy people that may do harm, when I am by myself somewhere stopped I am always aware of my surroundings, always. That is the most important thing not only for women but all riders, always be aware of everything around you. I carry pepper spray when I am riding alone, and I always tell family where I am going and my expected arrival time give or take a couple of hours.
    By riding solo I have found who I truelly am, and not who I could be. I find myslef more centered and confident as a person. More willing to engage others in conversation because I have the ride and bike to talk about. I am proud to be riding through the countryside and seeing what I see and knowing that I am doing it through courage and strength to just do it and not second guess myself. I was so scared of tipping the bike over if I leaned to far, or what would happen if I did need help, would others look at me like "oh, that is typical, a woman that can't even manuever her bike.." then I stopped and thought to myself that I can do this I am not a wimp for petes sake. I started lifting weights more than before to gain the muscles needed for maneuvering a bigger bike and found out that I am just fine. I love riding for all that it is. The wind, the motorcycle waves, the nods, the scenery, and yes even the appreciative eyes of other male motorcyclists.
    Female or Male when you ride there is almost like this secret society that is always welcoming no matter what you are on. They don't care, and they certainly don't care if you do tip your bike over and can't lift it, they just come running from out of the wood work and help out and say they have done it many times. Thankfully this has never happend but I have witnessed it first hand with my father and when he tipped his bike, people came running to help. And that is what it is about for me as a female rider and just a rider.

    Safe Journeys to all,
    Hallie

    P.S. Please read my tour I am doing for Antahkrana International, on www.bmwxplor.com go to Forums, scroll to US Touring, then Tibetan Tour Ride. I am Bike365, take a look at my blog and my photographs. I love comments and encourage them!

  2. #2
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    Steve Marquardt, 2004 R1150RT

  3. #3
    sMiling Voni's Avatar
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    I know that over the years the Women Who Ride seminar at the International has been so refreshing. Like all of the women (and men) who have attended.

    I liken it to a thinking and feeling seminar.

    Where else in the world can you find people who really get it?

    And now we have our own space.

    Glad to have you aboard, Hallie. Off to see your links. What an adventure you're having! Thanks for sharing it with us.

    Voni
    sMiling
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves/
    Live fully. Laugh deeply. Love widely.
    BMW MOA Ambassador / FOM / Roving Forum Moderator/
    Selected Friends of Wile E Coyote/ A Million BMW sMiles

  4. #4
    Registered User womanridge's Avatar
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    I juist got done riding accross Ill, Ind, Ohio and am outside Erie Pa as I write. I couldn't wait to check in on the forum.
    This is turning out to be great. Thanks everyone for posting.
    Karen Jacobs
    Moderator
    2012 R 1200 RT
    MOA-133005, RA32109, IBA #37923

  5. #5
    Registered User womanridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallie365 View Post
    I have always ridden solo, been called the Lone Ranger more than once and am independant as can be, good and bad. I struggle with asking for help when something is wrong with the bike or if I think I am doing something wrong. When I was learning how to ride I knew everything so I thought, not so, just pig headed. Now, I still ride solo, but with more common sense. I watch out all the time on the road for crazy people that may do harm, when I am by myself somewhere stopped I am always aware of my surroundings, always. That is the most important thing not only for women but all riders, always be aware of everything around you. I carry pepper spray when I am riding alone, and I always tell family where I am going and my expected arrival time give or take a couple of hours.
    By riding solo I have found who I truelly am, and not who I could be. I find myslef more centered and confident as a person. More willing to engage others in conversation because I have the ride and bike to talk about. I am proud to be riding through the countryside and seeing what I see and knowing that I am doing it through courage and strength to just do it and not second guess myself. I was so scared of tipping the bike over if I leaned to far, or what would happen if I did need help, would others look at me like "oh, that is typical, a woman that can't even manuever her bike.." then I stopped and thought to myself that I can do this I am not a wimp for petes sake. I started lifting weights more than before to gain the muscles needed for maneuvering a bigger bike and found out that I am just fine. I love riding for all that it is. The wind, the motorcycle waves, the nods, the scenery, and yes even the appreciative eyes of other male motorcyclists.
    Female or Male when you ride there is almost like this secret society that is always welcoming no matter what you are on. They don't care, and they certainly don't care if you do tip your bike over and can't lift it, they just come running from out of the wood work and help out and say they have done it many times. Thankfully this has never happend but I have witnessed it first hand with my father and when he tipped his bike, people came running to help. And that is what it is about for me as a female rider and just a rider.

    Safe Journeys to all,
    Hallie

    P.S. Please read my tour I am doing for Antahkrana International, on www.bmwxplor.com go to Forums, scroll to US Touring, then Tibetan Tour Ride. I am Bike365, take a look at my blog and my photographs. I love comments and encourage them!
    Thanks for jumping in Hallie 365. You and so many others are the reason I started this forum. Your story is great. Thank you, thank you, thank you. I really think this is a great place for women to jump in and be part of this wonderful world of riding. Don't be afraid to participate in other forums, but you and others are the reason for this one!
    Karen Jacobs
    Moderator
    2012 R 1200 RT
    MOA-133005, RA32109, IBA #37923

  6. #6
    "Running Out The Clock" grafikfeat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hallie365 View Post
    I have always ridden solo ... Female or Male when you ride there is almost like this secret society that is always welcoming no matter what you are on. They don't care, and they certainly don't care if you do tip your bike over and can't lift it, they just come running from out of the wood work and help out and say they have done it many times.

    Nicely put...
    Funny how we project our anxieties...
    This reminded of my early days and the transition from mini-bikes and dirt bikes to a licensed motorist/cyclist foraging out onto the highways and byways...

    ...and kudos on the new "Room with View" in the forums...

    ~ Jim
    "Stupidity, if left untreated, is self-correcting."

  7. #7
    Registered User Bullett's Avatar
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    Hi Hallie,

    I actually scared myself out of getting a used BMW R1100RS after I dropped it on a test ride. I'm vertically challenged and managed to stall the bike in a low spot where I couldn't get my toe down.

    I resigned myself to riding a cruiser to ease back into motorcycling. When I bought my RT in May 2007, I was convinced that I would drop the bike and I have--twice. Both drops were due to mental error and I learned two lessons: Never ride before coffee and in parking lot maneuvers, always make sure that you are really in first and not neutral! Sheesh!

    I gotta go check out your link. See ya!

  8. #8
    scenicviewrose
    Guest

    Hi...

    Just purchased my dream bike 1200RT Aug21,09--a friend gifted this Club opportunity to MOA....and I am thoroughly enjoying reading your threads/entries. I live in the utopia of Lancaster county farmlands w/ buggies,bonnets, bicycles and more. This is a wonderful area to learn/improve skills. However, I am feeling vulnerable or shall I just admit terrified of those other drivers on the road as well as dropping my bike(again-initiated x 1) Thanks for the enthusiasm, encouragement and tips
    Rose

  9. #9
    Registered User womanridge's Avatar
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    \\
    Quote Originally Posted by scenicviewrose View Post
    Just purchased my dream bike 1200RT Aug21,09--a friend gifted this Club opportunity to MOA....and I am thoroughly enjoying reading your threads/entries. I live in the utopia of Lancaster county farmlands w/ buggies,bonnets, bicycles and more. This is a wonderful area to learn/improve skills. However, I am feeling vulnerable or shall I just admit terrified of those other drivers on the road as well as dropping my bike(again-initiated x 1) Thanks for the enthusiasm, encouragement and tips
    Rose
    Congrats Rose. Welcome to the forum!! The 1200 RT is a fantasic bike. (I know, I own one). And what a great gift, the MOA Club. You will learn a lot in these different forums. Check out "Hexheads, Ride Reports, New Members and Regionals. And of course the new "Women of the MOA" forum here.
    Share your experiences and ask your questions. We're all family here.
    Karen Jacobs
    Moderator
    2012 R 1200 RT
    MOA-133005, RA32109, IBA #37923

  10. #10
    HALLIE365
    Guest

    Enjoying the post's!

    I am enjoying the post's about others fears I don't feel like it was just me. I was and still get paranoid sometimes when I have to stop at a stop sign or on uneven ground, I think to myself "Okay, if it does start to go over, STICK OUT THE LEG!" : )
    I learned to use my leg as a sort of kickstand and it works everytime. I have to laugh at the never practice after coffee! I would be shaking and hopped up on coffee and do the same thing, and couldn't figure out what was wrong with me, then I remembered the three cups of coffee before going out. Not so cool.

    Hallie: )

  11. #11
    HALLIE365
    Guest

    Smile Thank You!

    Quote Originally Posted by scenicviewrose View Post
    Just purchased my dream bike 1200RT Aug21,09--a friend gifted this Club opportunity to MOA....and I am thoroughly enjoying reading your threads/entries. I live in the utopia of Lancaster county farmlands w/ buggies,bonnets, bicycles and more. This is a wonderful area to learn/improve skills. However, I am feeling vulnerable or shall I just admit terrified of those other drivers on the road as well as dropping my bike(again-initiated x 1) Thanks for the enthusiasm, encouragement and tips
    Rose
    Thank you Rose,

    I am glad you are enjoying the posts on the webpage. Unfortunetly I may be to late to photograph the Amish here in Montana, they have all but maybe two families packed up and left, not sure why, and that is why I wanted to talk to them and photograph them and their way of life, so I am headed there this week to hopefully see them. Keep my fingers crossed!

  12. #12
    Registered User Bullett's Avatar
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    No pictures, but

    I carry a marvelous mental image from my ride to New Hampshire in August via Ontario. As we were riding on the road headed Southwest to Sault Ste. Marie we passed an Amish man who was literally flying along the opposite shoulder in his horse drawn wagon. He was standing in the wagon with his long beard flying back over his shoulder! He had an incredible, huge grin on his face and I couldn't help but grin and wave. . . He waved back!
    Sharon
    '07 R1200RT (my favorite!); '12 Yamaha Super Tenere (El Gordo); '07 Suzuki DR650SE (!);
    '59 R 26 (my first)

  13. #13
    "The Closer" dphinn's Avatar
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    Little gurl on big bike!

    Hi everyone! Just want to join in the conversation about being "too short" for bikes other than cruisers. I'm 5'3" ish and I ride a 2001 R1100RT. Had the seat altered to get it to a reasonable height. Have put 22,000 miles on it so far (in all- I have about 55,000 miles exp).

    I'll tell you all, I've dropped it 4 times! Hate it but got over it. All drops were no speed parking lot stuff. One drop was at the end of a ferry dock in West Seattle with about 25 other bikes watching. Uh huh, very humiliating. And couldn't pick it up. One of the 6 guys that came forward to help told me not to worry, he dropped his bike a week prior. A young guy not concerned about his ego, very cool.

    I've got hard side cases and engine guards that take the brunt of these little laspes in concentration. Those German engineers made these bikes to handle the world! They can take a no or low speed drop. If they couldn't I wouldn't ride 'em.

    Really, it's all about knowing yourself and knowing the bike. Thankfully, I get on mine just about everyday!
    The Closer

  14. #14
    Registered User womanridge's Avatar
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    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by dphinn View Post
    Hi everyone! Just want to join in the conversation about being "too short" for bikes other than cruisers. I'm 5'3" ish and I ride a 2001 R1100RT. Had the seat altered to get it to a reasonable height. Have put 22,000 miles on it so far (in all- I have about 55,000 miles exp).

    I'll tell you all, I've dropped it 4 times! Hate it but got over it. All drops were no speed parking lot stuff. One drop was at the end of a ferry dock in West Seattle with about 25 other bikes watching. Uh huh, very humiliating. And couldn't pick it up. One of the 6 guys that came forward to help told me not to worry, he dropped his bike a week prior. A young guy not concerned about his ego, very cool.

    I've got hard side cases and engine guards that take the brunt of these little laspes in concentration. Those German engineers made these bikes to handle the world! They can take a no or low speed drop. If they couldn't I wouldn't ride 'em.

    Really, it's all about knowing yourself and knowing the bike. Thankfully, I get on mine just about everyday!
    Welcome to the Women of the MOA forum, dphinn. I've heard it said, there are those who have dropped their bike and those that will. You sound like you have the right attitude.
    Look forward to seeing you here often. Don't forget to drop in on "New Members" forum at the top of the page. I expect you'll find welcoming there as well.
    Last edited by womanridge; 09-22-2009 at 11:50 PM.
    Karen Jacobs
    Moderator
    2012 R 1200 RT
    MOA-133005, RA32109, IBA #37923

  15. #15
    HELEN
    Guest

    Thumbs up Speed Thrills

    Quote Originally Posted by Bullett View Post
    I carry a marvelous mental image from my ride to New Hampshire in August via Ontario. As we were riding on the road headed Southwest to Sault Ste. Marie we passed an Amish man who was literally flying along the opposite shoulder in his horse drawn wagon. He was standing in the wagon with his long beard flying back over his shoulder! He had an incredible, huge grin on his face and I couldn't help but grin and wave. . . He waved back!

    Wonderful image!

    I have my own Amish story...

    Several years ago a friend and I took the long way home and spent a delightful Sunday afternoon zipping through Amish Farm country in northern Indiana. It's that part of the country that the roads were designed around the farmers fields instead of through them. So every once in a while, out of nowhere, you come to a 90 degree corner... you have to slow down to very low speeds.

    We came to one of these corners and there was a farm house right inside near the road. In the back we could see lots of buggies, horses and long tables set up for Sunday afternoon dinner.

    I was thinking how delightful! this is the way to live, back to the basics... bucolic!

    While the adult were in the back yard there was a small group of boys and girls in their dresses, bonnets, black pants with suspenders, blue shirts and the little flat black hats. in the front yard.

    "Oh, how perfect!" I should stop and take a picture by have no idea where I put the camera.

    We had to slow down to nearly 10 miles an hour to navigate the turn, and the kids knew it. At the very apex of the curve those darling little picturesque boys started pelting us with rocks!

    Dang! We rolled on the throttles and weren't hit but I couldn't stop laughing...

    "Boys will be Boys!"

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