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Thread: Old vrs new

  1. #31
    Rideoften
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    Quote Originally Posted by shire2000 View Post
    Looked at the R1200R and sat on one. Did not like the look nor the seating position. Plus, it feels heavy as heck in comparison to my R100RT. If other manufacturers can make retro styled or even just updated old style bikes that pass EPA, then why can't BMW? Because they have chosen not to.
    Shire2000, You owe it to yourself to try the R1200R. Sitting on a bike is just not a good test to see if it's a bike you may enjoy. I think the looks of the 1200R are striking and trust me, it does EVERYTHING better than your R100RT. It's faster, lighter, handles better, better brakes, better mpg, and maintenance is equal to what you're used to (okay it has a couple more valves per side) but NO carbs to mess with. If you tried one for an afternoon of mixed riding they'd probably have to PRY you off of it. Speak poorly of it AFTER you've tried it. I'm not saying get rid of your airhead, just be open minded.

    Ride Safe,
    MB

  2. #32
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 108625 View Post
    "Soul"?

    People can use whatever language they want to explain their choices, but "soul" is just another way of saying it all comes down to wanting to be different taking a higher priority than other criteria.
    (Such as performance, design, comfort, reliability, or whatever else).

    Put another way; if the classic UJM was always boxer powered and just as ubiquitous, and the less common BMW was always a transverse four and just as uncommon, the same crowd would be bestowing "soul" on the tranverse four BMW because it was different from all the boxer-powered UJMs.

  3. #33
    shire2000
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    I think "soul" is very subjective. We will all have our own definition. Some of us may not be able to describe it in words, while others can go on about it forever. I think it has a lot to do with a combination of things. Looks, appeal, touch and feel, how you react to it, etc. Very hard to put a proper definition on it.

    As to riding the R1200R, the next time I get to a BMW dealer that has one, I just might do that, if they let me. The closest dealer to me is not always keen on letting people do test rides. Heck, half the time I go in there they don't even really want to talk to me. I have to go and ask for assistance while the "sales representative" is getting another capucinno. Sometimes they can be a snooty bunch. Yet other times, they can be all charm and try to be as helpful as possible.

    Now, I also have looked at the R1200RT as a replacement for my R100RT. That just does not cut it for me. Way too many bells and whistles. If the R1200R could have a fairing similar to the R100RT and get rid of that huge hump that is supposed to look like a gas tank, then maybe I might get more interested. Lots of people want all those bells and whistles, and that is great for them. Myself, I want it as simple as possible. Sure, on my old R100RT I have to adjust the carbs now and again, but have you ever tried to adjust your fuel injection? Most maintenance between the 2 is similar, but when it gets into computerized stuff, well, that is way beyond most of us. When we go touring, I seriously doubt that many of us would be dragging along a specialized laptop that can access the bikes computer system, along with the expensive software required to do it. But I can sure get a set of Bings working well enough to get home under some pretty adverse conditions. Not all of us ride where there are lots of BMW dealers around, even on supposed street bikes.

    I am not saying that the new bikes are bad. I am just saying that for the type of riding I do, matched up with my mechanical skills, I prefer it to be as simple as possible.

  4. #34
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shire2000 View Post
    Myself, I want it as simple as possible. Sure, on my old R100RT I have to adjust the carbs now and again, but have you ever tried to adjust your fuel injection?
    It's pretty much the same as the carbs (but more sensitive). Do you have Carb Stix or a Twinmax? It's the same tool for fuel injection. Maybe add in a Digital Volt Meter if you're going to touch the TPS.

    Most maintenance between the 2 is similar, but when it gets into computerized stuff, well, that is way beyond most of us. When we go touring, I seriously doubt that many of us would be dragging along a specialized laptop that can access the bikes computer system, along with the expensive software required to do it.
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  5. #35
    Cannonball Rider #52 darrylri's Avatar
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    (Actually, I have to admit that I don't carry a GS-911 with me; don't even own one. I have a Twinmax, but I've only used it a few times because all of my bikes that can be serviced with it go to the local independent shop for routine service.

    In about 185k miles of riding three different Airheads, I've been stranded twice; in almost 340k miles of riding three Oil/Hex heads, I've been stranded thrice. That's roughly a once in 100k miles experience.

    In four the five cases above, if I'd had a full Snap-On tool chest and a Moditec computer along, it wouldn't have mattered, the bike couldn't be fixed by the side of the road. I'm talking about a dead diode board, a broken final drive, broken drive shaft, and a completely blown motor. All of these components had serious mileage on them before they let go, and they owed me little if anything. The motor, for example, had 180k miles on it, was never babied, and I was doing ~6,000rpm and 110mph on the Authobahn at the time it let go.

    Frankly, I think this "easier to fix!"/"never breaks!" argument (less filling! tastes great!) is a bunch of hooey. You get a bike into good operating condition and you do the routine maintenance, and then it runs well for a long time. I just don't sweat these very occasional big problems. Any motorcycle is far more highly streesed than just about any car, so if I get car-like reliability out of my bikes, I'm very pleased.)
    --Darryl Richman, forum liaison
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  6. #36
    Registered User ALIENHITCHHIKER's Avatar
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    This, I really like (just might be my next one):

    http://www.hanniganmotorcyclefairings.com/
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    Steve
    Current Hottie: '00 R1100RT
    Old Flames: FY K100RT, '80 XS850 with Vetter Quicksilver, '67 Bonnie, '66 Honda 90

  7. #37
    On the road again! R80RTJohnny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBasa View Post
    I like them all.

    The new ones have strengths and the old ones have charms.
    Having ridden both an Airhead and Hexhead back to back today I can only agree with your post.

    So well said!
    2008 R12RT (Blue)
    1986 R80RT (Silver)

    Member of the Loonie-Tics. MOA 292.

  8. #38
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBasa View Post
    The new ones have strengths...
    ...and weaknesses; and the old ones have advantages not found in the new ones.

  9. #39
    The Blue Max 31310's Avatar
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    I own older and newer bikes and each has merits so I offer this thought. For all who ask what to do when the new technology breaks and what then? How many of us drive vehicles with points ignition, heat our homes with wood/coal or use candles? Do we drive modern vehicles, heat with forced air furnaces, use light bulbs? My guess is very few in our modern societies use the former technolgies. We appear to accept newer things, even if I grumble about it at times and carry on. Hey, we would not be exchanging opinions were it not for computers.
    I have been stranded with my '83RT (still own it) and somehow survived standing on the shoulder in the summer. I'm concerned with being stranded in winter which means my bikes are not a factor. I own an '07RT and there is no comparison (imho) between the two in terms of handling, braking, power and with help on this board, have done my own servicing too. If memory serves, think the weights on each bike are about the same. Should the '07 ever leave me on the side of the road, will make a call on my cell. Styling is a personal matter, few except for other beemer nuts have ever suggested the '83 is a good looking bike. However, non riders (& even Harley types) have said "that is a sharp looking bike" re the '07, even my mother in law likes it. I'm not taking a shot at airhead owners as one of my bikes is an airhead. I appreciate both bikes, recognize the strengths/weakness of each and consider myself very fortunate to own and ride them.

  10. #40
    Registered User kz1000ken's Avatar
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    My R80RT is a darn fine machine.. I bought an R1100 RT because I wanted "the new stuff" but I just couldn't bring myself to give up on the Airhead. Its fun to ride, has that "old bike charm". From a practical perspective, the 80's luggage is the best, it fits a Full Face XL Helmet AND your sweater in one bag. I love the bike and ride it thousands of miles a year..

    My Oilhead R1100RT is far and away my favorite bike of all time, out of all the bikes Ive ever owned.. I like it even more than the R1200RT I test rode, mainly because of the look and the seating position.

    Anyway, the Airheads are just too cool, too much fun, and too easy to keep running to ever give up on.. The new stuff is great too...

    so my reply is really one step closer to becoming "why you need multiple bikes" response..

  11. #41
    Still Wondering mika's Avatar
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    Data panels, accessory and features lists included in a bikes description are objective. The experience of riding and or owning a bike is subjective. I currently have one bike because that is all my wallet will allow. I have ridden and own many different bikes over the years. Used for the right purpose on a given day each has been the best bike I have ever ridden for some reason. At another time each has been the spawn of satanÔÇÖs design board. In the end old or new, high or low tech ÔÇô I like bikes.

    Hey Scott, spending time at the Ural dealer now?
    Pass the mustard and UP THE REVOLUTION!

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