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Thread: Like the new bikes? Thoughts on BMW's vision.

  1. #76
    Bob
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Big Sky country (Montana)
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    1,166
    Quote Originally Posted by hillbillypolack View Post
    Try owning anything Italian. I love 'em, but the points you bring up are magnified with some other brands. . .
    I wouldn't doubt it.

    However, I was pointing out that most of BMW's range is now being built to compete with the Japanese. The company has even said as much in some cases.
    If you want to be competetive, that means you must expect to be subject to scrutiny and comparison on many levels. Most of the people I know who ride japanese bikes (and I'm one of them) do shop around.

    The Italians, on the other hand, aren't playing that game. A Ducati is still distinctly a Ducati, a Moto Guzzi is still distinctly a Guzzi. They stand out in identity and most are sold to people who want to have one, period (they're not shopping around much, if at all).

  2. #77
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Virginia Beach
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    701
    The only thing that bugs me about any of the new models is that they no longer have a bike with a fat front tire (read Montauk or CLC). I have hit so many deep potholes on my daily commute that would have certainly bent the rim on any other "skinny" front tired Beemer...and, as we all know, rims are expensive.

  3. #78
    RTRyder
    Guest
    There's something to be said for both simplicity and technology. The motorcycles I currently have in the garage span 50 years of technology, the simplest being the single cylinder, magneto ignition, 1957 Norton ES2.

    The ES2 is pretty much as basic as motorcycling gets and great fun to take for short rides on nice days, doesn't take much in the way of tools or knowledge to keep it running once properly setup, but I sure wouldn't want to have to use it on a daily basis regardless of how easy it is to fix when necessary.

    At the other end of the spectrum is the 07 R 1200 RT, my first BMW. Were it not for the fact that I've been involved in the computer business for close to 30 years now, this one would be going to the dealer for all of its service needs, there aren't that many user serviceable parts under all that plastic measured by the more traditional standards of the shade tree mechanic. Last service I did on the RT found me with laptop computer connected to the diagnostic port via a GS-911 while I did he throttle body sync with a TwinMax, certainly not the screwdriver and cigarette paper tuning methodology of a Lucas magdyno here folks!

    So these days I find myself with both the oldest and newest machines closest to the door. For short, wide grin rides, I take the 52 year old Norton, If I seriously want or need to get someplace fast or faraway, the RT gets the nod.

    I've lost count of how many motorcycles I've owned in the close to 40 years I've been riding, BMW's technology and reputation is what sold me on the RT along with the fact that it fit me like a glove from the first moment I sat on one (6'2" @ 215 lbs), no other motorcycle has ever done that regardless of country of origin.

    From my perspective, they're on the right path. Perhaps BMW is diluting their heritage in the view of some more traditionally oriented owners, but the same has been said about Harley Davidson and a few other brands that dare to venture into the modern age. With a few "traditional" British machines sitting in my garage, I can say with a fair degree of certainty that motorcycle manufacturers that don't embrace technology with a vision towards the future risk becoming history.

    My $.02

  4. #79
    JAMESDUNN
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by RTRyder View Post
    There's something to be said for both simplicity and technology. The motorcycles I currently have in the garage span 50 years of technology, the simplest being the single cylinder, magneto ignition, 1957 Norton ES2.

    The ES2 is pretty much as basic as motorcycling gets and great fun to take for short rides on nice days, doesn't take much in the way of tools or knowledge to keep it running once properly setup, but I sure wouldn't want to have to use it on a daily basis regardless of how easy it is to fix when necessary.

    At the other end of the spectrum is the 07 R 1200 RT, my first BMW. Were it not for the fact that I've been involved in the computer business for close to 30 years now, this one would be going to the dealer for all of its service needs, there aren't that many user serviceable parts under all that plastic measured by the more traditional standards of the shade tree mechanic. Last service I did on the RT found me with laptop computer connected to the diagnostic port via a GS-911 while I did he throttle body sync with a TwinMax, certainly not the screwdriver and cigarette paper tuning methodology of a Lucas magdyno here folks!

    So these days I find myself with both the oldest and newest machines closest to the door. For short, wide grin rides, I take the 52 year old Norton, If I seriously want or need to get someplace fast or faraway, the RT gets the nod.

    I've lost count of how many motorcycles I've owned in the close to 40 years I've been riding, BMW's technology and reputation is what sold me on the RT along with the fact that it fit me like a glove from the first moment I sat on one (6'2" @ 215 lbs), no other motorcycle has ever done that regardless of country of origin.

    From my perspective, they're on the right path. Perhaps BMW is diluting their heritage in the view of some more traditionally oriented owners, but the same has been said about Harley Davidson and a few other brands that dare to venture into the modern age. With a few "traditional" British machines sitting in my garage, I can say with a fair degree of certainty that motorcycle manufacturers that don't embrace technology with a vision towards the future risk becoming history.

    My $.02
    I love this post. I am not abandoning BMW but I am considering a British Enfield now owned by an Indian company and modernized somewhat, but the look is still there. Not even retro, since it never changed. It is an example of what retro replicates. I am also thinking of a retro Duck or Guzzi. Id be interested in an updated version of your Norton as well.
    BMW may well be on the "right track". What concerns me the most is dealership availability. Think Honda and their myriad dealers. Wish BMW had more around; perhaps the new product will allow them to expand. That is, if they can sell enough of 'em.

  5. #80
    Figaro1100R
    Guest
    I test rode my first BMW about three weeks ago. The salesman was kind enough to point out the individual turn signal switches and noted the cancel switch on the right.

    Somehow, I made an assumption the engineers had continued the symmetry so, as I entered the freeway I begin honking the horn frantically in an attempt to cancel the left signal.

    I bought an oil head. I don't honk the horn anymore but I still tend to fumble around with the cancel switch.

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