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Thread: Hexhead - shifting - into 1st from neutral

  1. #16
    Conrad konrad's Avatar
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    Read deilenberger's first response - he is spot on. It is technique. Nothing is wrong.
    Konrad

    2008 R1200 GS
    1995 R1100 GS (Traded-In)

  2. #17
    masione
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    Quote Originally Posted by _RockZ_ View Post
    So does letting it warm up also help?

    or I also heard that letting the Bikes warm up,is not a good Idea,although mine shifts better when warm .

    So does any body have any input?
    Actually, the owners manual and the folks in my local BMW service shop strongly advise against any warm-up period for my 1200GS. As we all know, those lovely jugs crave air movement to keep them cool, lest their silver paint turns a ghastly black and the oil level viewing window melts and falls out. (Pardon the drama, it IS Halloween).

  3. #18
    crilly
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    I agree with Rich. Just apply pressure to the shifter and release the culuch lever a little.

  4. #19
    seto12
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    I,m a rider that shifts into neutral at stoplites. What are the thoughts on this practice? The release bearing used in the clutch slave cylinder does,nt look to be very strong.

  5. #20
    God? What god? roborider's Avatar
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    There have been two times in the last 4 years where having the bike in first gear and ready to go have saved me getting rear ended. Once a car stops behind me, I sometimes will go to neutral. Sometimes you have things you need to do with both hands. But never until a car is stopped and blocking my behind.

    I never worry about clutch/bearing wear. I'm not a BMW expert, but I've never had any clutch problems on any bike short of normal wear and replacement issues.
    Rob C. , Raleigh, NC
    '05 R12RT, R90/6
    2007 CBR600RR & 09 V-Star
    Suzuki DR 350

  6. #21
    rabid reader dbrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rspennachio View Post
    I have been able to eliminate the 1st to 2nd gear clunk most of the time by adjusting my clutch timing and lentgh of pull depending on how easy or hard I am accelerating. Brisk clutch and shift action above 4500 rpm almost always eliminates the clunk too.

    This also happens to me when down shifting but I say "loud grears save lives!"
    As Don illustrated in post #2, technique is important.

    As for upshifts: instead of pulling in the clutch and then moving the shift lever, I pull in the clutch lever at the same time I'm putting upward pressure on the shifter. As the clutch plates disengage, the driving force through the transmission (which tends to keep the shift dogs engaged) reduces, and the box slips into the next gear. I aim to shift with the clutch lever pulled only halfway, and almost always succeed.

    Don't chop the throttle as you shift up. Rolling off the throttle only a little makes the clutch reengagement after shiftiing much smoother. On my bike, even when in good tune, closing the throttle causes the rpms to drop precipitiously; even bikes with better FI than mine shift more smoothly while maintaining some throttle opening. I'll probably get flamed for this, but on city streets, I often make the 1-2 shift at 2500 rpm or less.

    As to downshifts: you'll need to pull the clutch level all the way. Because the lower gear requires more revs for the same speed, you should slightly open the throttle as you downshift. With practice, I can now shift down smoothly and silently into any gear. No clunks! I enjoy the finesse, and I'm sure it's easier on the machinery, too.
    David Brick
    Santa Cruz CA
    2007 R1200R

  7. #22
    Registered User bodpod's Avatar
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    New-be question?

    "If you're sitting at a light waiting to go - and you've shifted into neutral while waiting (we won't go into why this isn't a good idea..)"

    Why is this not recommended? I do it all the time on my '94 RSL. Thought it would be bad for the clutch to leave it engaged through the long stop lights in SoCal.

    Any help?

    BoydRT
    Boyd RT

    bikes currently owned: 1994 R1100RSL, 2008 R1200RT

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoydRT View Post
    "If you're sitting at a light waiting to go - and you've shifted into neutral while waiting (we won't go into why this isn't a good idea..)"

    Why is this not recommended? I do it all the time on my '94 RSL. Thought it would be bad for the clutch to leave it engaged through the long stop lights in SoCal.

    Any help?

    BoydRT
    It's not bad for the clutch, but it could be bad for you if a car is sliding into your rear end because the driver was texting or whatever. The idea is you can pop the clutch and try to get out of the way. If you are in neutral you lose precious time shifting.
    Since I have been rear ended twice ( fortunately in a car both times) I am prepared to move if I need to. Leave room between you and the car in front so you can make the move if necessary.

  9. #24
    God? What god? roborider's Avatar
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    Since the question was asked, I'll give some more detail:


    1) I was on a 4 lane road, double yellow. The double yellow had a break in it to allow for left hand turns into a restaurant. (For those of you in the area, this was the highway that goes through Townsend, TN toward the Foot Hills Parkway exit.)

    The speed limit there is about 35 I think, but it's not uncommon for traffic to be going 55, despite the heavy police presence.

    I was in the left lane, at the double yellow break, waiting to make a left into the parking lot. Behind me was a fast approaching SUV or Van, can't remember now. I was saying in my head, "OK, he sees me" over and over, but finally it became obvious that he did not see me and was going to plow right into me. I was flashing my brake lights furiously, no help. (I've since added the BMW auxiliary light.) I had the bike in gear, clutch in, as taught in the MSF class. Before that class, I'd have been in neutral, "saving my clutch". I couldn't turn left due to traffic, so I quickly let the clutch out and sped off.

    The movement of my motorcycle must have made me apparent to the driver as she (I could see her face now) slammed on her brakes. She skidded right through where I was and if I were still there, I might well be dead. She obviously did not have anti-lock brakes by the skid marks and smoke.

    So, I don't care about 'clutch wear' any more. I'm much more concerned about body wear, specifically my body flying into the air from a 50 mph rear end incident.

    Keep the bike in gear, and keep your eyes open. Practice a quick take off once in a while. If you drop the clutch and stall the bike in a panic, it won't be pretty.

    2) Number two is kind of funny. I was riding the Blue Ridge and I came around a bend and saw a large dog in the road. I thought, "What kind of moron lets his dog run loose on the parkway!" Well, no one, because it was not a dog, it was a BEAR CUB!

    I stopped quickly about 75 feet away, in gear. I was admiring the cub when it dawned on me that Mom might be ready to jump out and stomp my skinny butt, so I dropped the clutch to take off and get out of there. Well, I had stopped so suddenly that I didn't realize I was in second gear and stalled the RT. So, practice this stuff once in a while. You never know when you might get jumped by a PO'd bear Mom.
    Rob C. , Raleigh, NC
    '05 R12RT, R90/6
    2007 CBR600RR & 09 V-Star
    Suzuki DR 350

  10. #25
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BoydRT View Post
    Why is this not recommended? I do it all the time on my '94 RSL. Thought it would be bad for the clutch to leave it engaged through the long stop lights in SoCal.

    Any help?

    BoydRT
    While RoboRider and alanrd are correct, don't let their advice turn into a hard and fast rule that you use without thinking. The goal is to be aware of your surroundings and know when shifting into neutral doesn't increase your risk vs when it may.

    Example: when surrounded by stopped cars at a stoplight that experience tells you is going to be red for another 2 minutes.... go ahead and shift into neutral if you want to give your hand a rest.

  11. #26
    God? What god? roborider's Avatar
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    I agree. In my previous post, I was saying that once a car stops behind me and protects my rear, I will sometimes go to neutral. Also, you always need to leave room between you and the car in front. Being in gear is no help if you have no where to run!
    Rob C. , Raleigh, NC
    '05 R12RT, R90/6
    2007 CBR600RR & 09 V-Star
    Suzuki DR 350

  12. #27
    Registered User 802's Avatar
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    You are entirely correct, Robo. Be sure to leave yourself an out and watch your six until it's covered.


    Ride Safe. Keep the Rubber Down!
    Last edited by rich223vt; 01-05-2010 at 02:21 AM. Reason: spellin'
    RichW
    2007 R12RT
    DS/DS, OEF, OIF

  13. #28
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    my method

    I put a little force on the shift lever with the clutch in. I slowly let the clutch out until it falls into gear. I immediately pull the clutch in again and then proceed as usual. Easy peasy.

  14. #29
    Registered User bodpod's Avatar
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    Shifting to neutral at stoplights.

    Thanks guys, great advice from all! I'm a little to trusting I guess and it could very well bite me in the ass...literally! Situational awareness is what we call it in the Navy.

    Boyd RT
    Boyd RT

    bikes currently owned: 1994 R1100RSL, 2008 R1200RT

  15. #30
    Jack Herbst
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    I never shift into nuetral at a light. Thats why my left forarm is twice the size of my right.
    Jack

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