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Thread: Sidi Boots: Recommended Sources?

  1. #16
    Sir Darby Darryl Cainey's Avatar
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    Sidi Boots Source

    Check out Iron Pony in Ohio on-line.

    Darryl
    Ambassador BMW MOA Ontario Canada
    President Niagara BMW Riders #298
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    1977 R100RS, (Retired) 1993 R100GS (just getting started)

  2. #17
    Rally Rat RTRandy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TandemGeek View Post
    We'll see. I would have preferred to bag a pair from a local dealer even at a higher cost just to keep the dollars in our community and to support their biz. However, it would appear the smaller sizes (42 and 41) just aren't something even the stocking dealers keep in stock: 43 and up are covered nicely with a very robust inventory.

    Everyone is happy to order them, but only if you're confident you'll be taking them home vs. making sure they fit before sliding the four Franklins and a Grant over the counter, never mind paying the tax man his 7%.
    We have a well regarded motorcycle gear stop here in Dallas called Moto Liberty https://www.motoliberty.com/list_pro...=11&SubCatID=8 that has a good range of products with a full size range. They stock sizes down to a men's size 5. Size 42 Euro is a US size 8 Size 41 Euro is a US size 7 and so on.

    It appears the pricing goes off of a "Suggested retail" hence most places on the web seem to be at the same price. Moto Liberty offers free shipping and they are great people to deal with in case you need to swap.

  3. #18
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Combat Boots here;

    I ride offroad fairly frequently and bought Aerostitch Combats, made by SIDI. Tough is an understatement and they are heavy, kick anything kind of boots. Not waterproof per say, BUT are indeed watertight in near floods. These are not comfy kiking boots and have soooo much heavy leather, it takes an extended breakin period to walk any distance. Mine have been fine for over a year now riding GSA1200...These are a GS riders boot and not really for the pretty street fashion buffs...Randy

  4. #19
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    Try extremesupply.com, they are about $100 cheaper than Newenough for the Sidi
    On Road.

  5. #20
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    The Sidi Crossfire SRS for a commute and street riding is like taking a Abrams tank to a station wagon fight. It's a very odd choice.


  6. #21
    ONE LESS HARLEY 04r1150rs's Avatar
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    I really like my Sidi On Road boots, the soles wore out and I had new soles put on the boot, far better than paying $325 for another pair. I think it was $65 to resole the boots. Just an option as the lugs on the soles are rather thin.
    Richard
    2004 R1150RS
    1984 R80 G/S
    2003 Suzuki DRZ 400S

  7. #22
    TANDEMGEEK
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    Quote Originally Posted by knary View Post
    The Sidi Crossfire SRS for a commute and street riding is like taking a Abrams tank to a station wagon fight. It's a very odd choice.
    Crossfire TAs, not SRS... and yes, it is an odd choice.

    Were it not for my broken ankle which is still on the mend coupled with the unique design of the Crossfire I would have never considered an MX boot for the road and may still live to regret the odd choice.

    Just trying on the Crossfires I was really amazed at how comfortable they were. I tried on a pair of Sidi Discovery boots as well and actually preferred the fit and feel of the Crossfire, never mind the lateral bracing. I also looked at the road racing boots and, again, they just didn't have the lateral bracing I was looking for.

    Time will tell if it was a wise choice and/or if I'll wear them beyond a few months. However, given the choice between not riding for a few more months and wearing what seem like a ski-boot you can actually walk in and shift with, I'll take the ski boot.

  8. #23
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    I've got a pair of size 42 Sidis in almost new condition in my storage. MX-like, but I can't for the life of me remember the exact model. I can look on my Thursday day off if you're interested. They'd be around $85.00. I pranged my knee severely in a drunk-driver run into my bike road-incident. I'm not sure I'll ever have a knee re-habbed enough to use the boots. PM me if you're interested. ,

    Quote Originally Posted by TandemGeek View Post
    Crossfire TAs, not SRS... and yes, it is an odd choice.

    Were it not for my broken ankle which is still on the mend coupled with the unique design of the Crossfire I would have never considered an MX boot for the road and may still live to regret the odd choice.

    Just trying on the Crossfires I was really amazed at how comfortable they were. I tried on a pair of Sidi Discovery boots as well and actually preferred the fit and feel of the Crossfire, never mind the lateral bracing. I also looked at the road racing boots and, again, they just didn't have the lateral bracing I was looking for.

    Time will tell if it was a wise choice and/or if I'll wear them beyond a few months. However, given the choice between not riding for a few more months and wearing what seem like a ski-boot you can actually walk in and shift with, I'll take the ski boot.

  9. #24
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Irish1 - not looking for books just wanted to say I am sorry to hear about your accident and wishing you a speedy and full recovery
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
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  10. #25
    TANDEMGEEK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irish1 View Post
    I've got a pair of size 42 Sidis in almost new condition in my storage.
    PM sent.

    For those who are still following the thread, I received my Sidi Crossfire TAs on Monday. The right boot was a perfect fit, but my still swollen left foot and ankle made for a tight fit in the left boot... not so tight that I couldn't wear them, but it's definitely snug. On the bright side, under all of that 'armor' is a leather boot that gives a bit on the TA with the normal sole and the TA was a bit wider than the SRS as expected which is why they fit. There's no way a 42 SRS would have worked.

    The first thing to go on the boots were the toe caps held on by 3 screws and 5 nails each and that vastly improved the footing when backing the bike up and, well, did away with the Harley Bad-Ass look. Walking around isn't all that bad once the boots start to wear-in; however, they make more noise than a pair of new corduroy pants: squeak, squeak, squeak. I'm hoping that will go away as the smooth plastic parts that are rubbing against each other get scuffed up and wear-in. If not, no big deal as I'm already a bit of a sight when I walk-in to work in my gear each day. Speaking of gear, the boots are a tight fit under my leather overpants, but should be a good fit under the textile overpants I tend to wear in both the warmer and cooler weather.

    As for wearing them on the bike, I had to raise the shifter to the highest, all-screwed-in position so that the toe box would fall under the shifter after finding that I was using the side of the boot to shift on the first 'test ride'. Even though the boots are pretty massive and felt a bit cumbersome on the first ride to work, on each successive trip they've gotten to be a bit more familiar and shifting has almost become intuitive... again, remembering I've been in a cast and unable to ride for the past three months. Moreover, I just switched over to the R11S in early January after 8 years on my CBR1100: the shifting was balky to begin with compared to the 'bird. Lest I digress... The biggest 'issues' I've had with the big boots and the added bulk around the upper part of my lower leg were:

    1. Making sure I swing my leg high enough to clear my painted city case lids as there's a lot of exposed hardware on these bad-boys that will scratch the heck out of the cases which wasn't the case with the all-leather Oxtar & AlpineStar Goretex boots.

    2. Making sure I turn my left toe in to pull up the side stand so that I don't accidentally hit the shifter with my armored calf and stall the bike and, just in case, also make a point of pulling in the clutch when I'm retracting the side stand to preclude that 'jerk and stall' if I happen to clip the shifter anyway.

    3. Finding the added bulk of full-height bulk makes backing the bike up a bit more challenging in that I find myself pushing up the pegs and, well, that's just the way it works: NBD.

    If I didn't have the busted ankle these would not have been my first choice for a dedicated road boot. But, with just two days of using them on the bike, they ain't all that bad on the road either. What I do know now is, even if I didn't go for the armor-plated MX boots, I'd be looking for something with a bit more protection than the Oxtar and AlpineStar Goretex lightweights I had been wearing as they were comfy and stayed dry in the rain, but they just didn't offer much in the way of reinforcement and protection of the lower leg and ankle.

    More to follow after I spend a few weeks on the bike with the boots.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by TandemGeek; 04-30-2009 at 09:45 AM.

  11. #26
    bmdubyou
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    Now THOSE are some BOOTS man! Wow...I just got some Italian boots (Vendramini) and they were like wearing tennis shoes. I sent them back and am back in the market. Do they make something in between those Sidis and a more subdued looking street boot? I like the idea of armor but not sure if Im ready for all-out MX boots.

  12. #27
    TANDEMGEEK
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmdubyou View Post
    Do they make something in between those Sidis and a more subdued looking street boot? I like the idea of armor but not sure if Im ready for all-out MX boots.
    Unfortunately, while there are a boat load of really nice boots in the Sidi line, this was the only one that was laterally rigid enough for what I was looking for. However, just to be clear, even these would not prevent a broken ankle if you got your foot turned around under your bike. That would require a ski boot and, well, that ain't gonna work.

    That said, there are some pretty nice boots in the Sidi line-up
    http://www.motonation.com/sidihome.asp

    If I were starting over from scratch and not nursing a broken ankle back to health, I'd have given strong consideration to the touring On-Road or Discovery Rain off-road boots vs. the Charger or my over-the-top-for-the-road Crossfire TA.

    Of course, the more I ride around in my Crossfires..... everything else, even road racing boots, seem a bit puny.

  13. #28
    Registered User tbonesr1100's Avatar
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    I've been wearing the Strada Rains for about 9 years and love them. I bought them direct from motonation...I think at the time, the model was called Strada Tepor...They work great...
    2004 R1100S
    2008 Buell 1125R, 2009 Buell XB9SX
    2006 Honda CRF 250x
    2000 Honda XR 70, XR100

  14. #29
    TANDEMGEEK
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    30 Day Update

    It's been 30 days since I started to make my daily commutes in the Sidi Crossfires.

    Overall: No complaints, no issues and lots of laterial support for my still-mending broken left ankle.

    Squeaks: A full coating of Sno-Seal Beeswax Waterproofing material to the leather or lorica portions of the boot eliminated all of the squeaks that were coming from the dry contact points between the leather/lorica and plastic outer components.

    On the Bike: It actually feels pretty good to have a snug fitting, full-height boot on all of the time, more so that I originally expected. Temps have just started to tickle the 90's here in Atlanta and, at least on my 30 - 45 minute commute, I don't find my feet or legs to be overheating, noting I wear a pair of Fieldsheer Four-Season mesh overpants that cover the ankle-up of the boot. They were also nice and toasty on the one day this month where the temps dipped back into the 30's on one of the morning rides. As for shifting and braking, shifting is not as intuitive as it is in a more pliable all-leather touring boot, but no different than what you'd experience riding GS / enduro in off-road boots. Frankly, I'm still not fully acclimated to the horribly clunky BMW transmission (having ridden a silky-smooth Honda CBR for the last decade) and find that to be far more annoying than the bulky boots. Again, all-in-all, they're isn't a profound downside to the use of these boots for my daily commutes.

    Off the Bike: Getting in and out of the boots is clearly not as easy as a slip-on, velcro-closure touring boots. However, it's not all that bad either. You simply close up the inner, velco-closure leather part of the boot and then engage the four cam-like latches: clik, clik, clik, clik, then repeat for the 2nd boot. Just as easy to get off as well. The fit is always the same and very snug given the way the Sidi retention system works. Walking around is a little clunky since the sole doesn't flex (as freely as a touring boot), but otherwise they're very comfortable. I have what is probably close to a 1/4 mile walk from the parking lot to my office that includes a 15* ramp and 6 flites of stairs. The weight of the boots becomes very obvious once I hit about the 4th flite of stairs: good cardio workout each AM. Walking up the ramp on the way to the parking lot is also a bit more effort than walking on flat land. From a visual perspective, as I already noted I wear overpants every day so the massive upper parts of the boots and 3 of the 4 buckles are all hidden from view and don't draw attention.

    Bottom Line: I'm extremely happy with the boots. Great protection and support on the bike and no negatives as far as commuting use goes. However, they are probably not well-suited for long walks or hikes off the bike, unless you're looking for a good workout given their hefty composition. Moreover, whereas I could sometimes cheat and wear my Oxtar or Alpinstar boots all day at work, the Sidi boots must most definitely be stashed under the desk.
    Last edited by TandemGeek; 06-05-2009 at 02:24 AM.

  15. #30
    Cage Rattler wezul's Avatar
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    Understanding your injury and need for support I can see why you chose a full boot but man, that is a lot of shoe.
    When I started back into riding three years ago I bought a pair of BMW Santiagos (43) and I think I've worn them two or three times. Support? Yes. Too much boot for me? YES!
    Then I went to the opposite end of the spectrum and bought a pair of BMW Street Sneakers. I like everything but the lace-ups. And I found I was looking for a little more sole (it's an inseam thing).
    So that takes me to my present Sidi Escapes. Easy in and out (some might say too easy) and the sole is the right height for me. The other boots are collecting dust now as I wear the Escapes in all weather.

    BTW I'm thinking of moving the Santiagos if anyone is interested, give me a PM, still have the box and other than being dusty these boots are cherry.

    I'm glad you found a boot to your liking. Let us know if you still like them after you no longer require the support for your ankle.

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