Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 30

Thread: wedge designer

  1. #1
    PRAY BEFORE RIDING roadcrave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    ninemilefalls,wash
    Posts
    313

    wedge designer

    where did this engine get designed and developed, anyone know????

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northern WV
    Posts
    621
    Germany?

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Marion,Ar.
    Posts
    4,878
    China?

  4. #4
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Evansville, WI
    Posts
    1,918
    Fat Baldistan?
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
    07 K1200GT Bought new, now traded in
    13 C650GT
    MOA 44606

  5. #5
    Daily Rider jurgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Red Rocks
    Posts
    302
    I still don't get it:
    A transverse crankshaft requires TWO sets of bevel gears from the engine to the real wheel. In engineering design class I learned that a set of bevel gears costs about 5% of power. So, we're losing 10% between the gearbox output and the rear wheel.
    With the boxer and brick designs it makes sense - a longitudinal crankshaft lends itself to a driveshaft design.
    But, why hold on to the driveshaft when it turns into an engineering fauxpas?
    Why does BMW not simply put a belt on the wedge? A belt costs about 3% in transmission power. And guaranteed 20 pounds less weight. Plus, it would also solve the final drive problems
    Or a chain??? No, that would be too Japanese
    Something to get the crowds fired up...

    So, here's my offer to BMW: If you put a belt on the wedge, I'll buy it. Till then, I'll ride my brick.
    J?rgen
    Red Rocks
    04 R1150GS adv
    04 K1200RS last of the great bricks

  6. #6
    BUDDINGGEEZER
    Guest
    The wedge inline four is basically the type of engine called the UJM (Universal Japanese motor). The first engine of this type in a motorcycle is the 1969 Honda CB750. The K brick engine is a UJM mounted on it's side longitudinally.

    Ralph Sims

  7. #7
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Urbana, IL
    Posts
    3,707
    Quote Originally Posted by jurgen View Post
    I still don't get it:
    A transverse crankshaft requires TWO sets of bevel gears from the engine to the real wheel. In engineering design class I learned that a set of bevel gears costs about 5% of power. So, we're losing 10% between the gearbox output and the rear wheel.
    With the boxer and brick designs it makes sense - a longitudinal crankshaft lends itself to a driveshaft design.
    But, why hold on to the driveshaft when it turns into an engineering fauxpas?
    Why does BMW not simply put a belt on the wedge? A belt costs about 3% in transmission power. And guaranteed 20 pounds less weight. Plus, it would also solve the final drive problems
    Or a chain??? No, that would be too Japanese
    Something to get the crowds fired up...

    So, here's my offer to BMW: If you put a belt on the wedge, I'll buy it. Till then, I'll ride my brick.
    Oh heck...I could be going 192.22 mph instead of 173. Bummer.
    BMWMotorcycles, fun when they're running...
    My other bike is a BMW.
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  8. #8
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Evansville, WI
    Posts
    1,918
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddingGeezer View Post
    The wedge inline four is basically the type of engine called the UJM (Universal Japanese motor). The first engine of this type in a motorcycle is the 1969 Honda CB750.
    Ralph Sims
    You wanna research that a tad Ralphie????
    Das ist inkorrect.

    Gilly
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
    07 K1200GT Bought new, now traded in
    13 C650GT
    MOA 44606

  9. #9
    Debbie's Servant Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    SW Iowa
    Posts
    1,476
    Quote Originally Posted by Gilly View Post
    You wanna research that a tad Ralphie????
    Das ist inkorrect.

    Gilly
    Since we are in the forum for the transverse inline four, I figured the 69 Honda 750 was the correct answer. I realize for aft inline fours have been around since the early 1900s.
    So I give up, who had the first transverse inline four in a motorcycle?
    Lee 2011 K1300S
    MOA # 30878
    Past BMW Bikes, 2003 K1200RS, 1991 K75S, 1987 K75T, 1984 R100RT

  10. #10
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Evansville, WI
    Posts
    1,918
    Well for sure Friedel Munch had it, I also have heard that Honda (like THE Mr Honda) got the idea from seeing a Munch at a European bike show (Cologne or where ever). I believe there may have been some before that, but Honda seeing a Munch was the real impetus.

    http://www.fasterandfaster.net/2007/...mut-tts-e.html

    Gilly
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
    07 K1200GT Bought new, now traded in
    13 C650GT
    MOA 44606

  11. #11
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Evansville, WI
    Posts
    1,918
    Consulted with a real cycle expert, he says in the 50s there were a few race bikes with transverse 4's, mentioning Gilera and NSU. There was an MV Agusta shown to the public in 1965, first one not sold until 1967.
    The first Munch was shown to the public in Feb 1966, was in the Cologne bike show in Sept 66 (where Honda saw it), and the first one was sold in Nov/Dec 1966, so the first transverse 4 sold to the public, in this guys opinion, was the Munch.

    Gilly
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
    07 K1200GT Bought new, now traded in
    13 C650GT
    MOA 44606

  12. #12
    BUDDINGGEEZER
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Gilly View Post
    Consulted with a real cycle expert, he says in the 50s there were a few race bikes with transverse 4's, mentioning Gilera and NSU. There was an MV Agusta shown to the public in 1965, first one not sold until 1967.
    The first Munch was shown to the public in Feb 1966, was in the Cologne bike show in Sept 66 (where Honda saw it), and the first one was sold in Nov/Dec 1966, so the first transverse 4 sold to the public, in this guys opinion, was the Munch.

    Gilly
    I stand corrected. damn Wikepedia. The 1968 M??nch-4 TTS 1200 Mammut did have an inline 4 overhead cam engine.

    Like it or not the, the K bike and 1000cc BMW liter bike is getting Japanese like. Wet clutch, transverse inline 4, chain on the liter bike. Some guys are gripping about the Jap like turn signal switch.

    Ralphie Sims

  13. #13
    What, me worry? GILLY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Evansville, WI
    Posts
    1,918
    I'd rather think that BMW finally caught up to Friedel Munch!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    87 K75S, bought new, now sold
    07 K1200GT Bought new, now traded in
    13 C650GT
    MOA 44606

  14. #14
    dtpetty
    Guest
    Like it or not the, the K bike and 1000cc BMW liter bike is getting Japanese like. Wet clutch, transverse inline 4, chain on the liter bike. Some guys are gripping about the Jap like turn signal switch.

    Ralphie Sims[/QUOTE]

    That turn signal switch would keep me from buying one - I'm serious! Vas vere dey tinking!?

  15. #15
    3 Red Bricks
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pleasanton, Ca.
    Posts
    3,373
    Quote Originally Posted by BuddingGeezer View Post
    The K brick engine is a UJM mounted on it's side longitudinally.

    Ralph Sims
    The Brick is more like BMWs CAR engines of the period (320i) than like a Japanese motorcycle engine.



    LONG MAY YOUR BRICK FLY!

    Ride Safe, Ride Far, Ride Often

    Lee Fulton Forum Moderator
    3 Marakesh Red K75Ss
    Mine, Hers, Spare

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •