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Thread: Lowering an F800ST that's already factory lowered

  1. #1
    pinkjacket
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    Lowering an F800ST that's already factory lowered

    I have an F800ST that has a factory lowered frame as well as a lowered seat. However, it is still about 1" too high and I am on my toes. While most of the time this is OK I would feel better if it were a tiny bit lower.

    So, I'm wondering if anyone knows if it's possible to lower the bike even further. I'm not sure if there's an additional lowering kit available. I was told by a local shop that new springs (???) could be made for the bike, but it would all be custom. Not sure how true this is. Also, if I am able to lower it further, will it adversely affect the performance/handling of the bike?

    Any advice/information would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Bob
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    My wife has an ST like yours; factory lowered suspension and low seat. She did not have to lower it any further, because of something else she had done years before:

    She raised her boots. A local shoe & boot repair shop can resole your riding boots and add an extra layer or two of material; up to between 3/4" and 1" before it interferes with shifting. It's a lot cheaper and easier than working on your bike, and if you ride more than one bike it helps with all of them. Maybe it will help you, too.

  3. #3
    Registered User
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    Have you tried the BMW extra low seat for the F800?

  4. #4
    Cage Rattler wezul's Avatar
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    The correct boots can make all the difference.
    Here's an example: I ride both an RT and an F800ST. Both have standard seats. On the ST I can wear my BMW Street Sneakers. Very thin sole and practically no heel. I am 6'1" and I can flat foot the bike no problem with a 31" and change inseam wearing those boots. (Yes, I am a weeble, they wobble but they don't fall down, center of gravity thing and all that)

    If I wear the same Street Sneakers on the RT, I am on my toes. This is not only uncomfortable and awkward but also downright dangerous.
    So I found a pair of Sidi Escapes that have a slightly thicker sole and taller heel.
    It's like night and day.

    I concur that you may want to try this approach, I would not want to pare down your seat anymore than it is now. If I remember correctly the lowered seat is accomplished by removing padding as opposed to altering the position of the seat pan.

  5. #5
    pinkjacket
    Guest
    I've thought about switching out my boots. I have Tourmaster touring boots now and they don't have much of a heel, but are super super comfortable for all day riding. In order for me to flat foot the bike I would have to get a boot with a 3-inch heel and that's not happening so I'm not sure how much help a thicker sole is going to be. I've also had difficulty finding touring boots for women that are comfortable and waterproof.

    I'll do a search on the internet and see what I come up as an alternative. The bike is going into the shop for it's 6k service so I might ask the guys there if it's possible to lower it further just to see what they say.

  6. #6
    Small road corner junkie pffog's Avatar
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    My wife has the same issue, but slowly overcame the "need" to have BOTH feet firmly planted. You said you had a lowered seat, but you might want to look at narrowing the seat, if you are petite, as a wide seat pushes your leg out at an angle.

    But lets face it, there is not a dirt bike around that anyone shorter than Shaq can flat foot. Even with my 35" inseam I can just flat foot my R11S that has been raised for cornering clearance.

    Yes you need to have good footing with ONE foot, and that may require a slight shift of the pelvis to the side to get. Work on developing that skill and you will be much happier and confident in your riding ability. And remember you only need feet on the ground when standing still, or backing up, not for u-turns or slow speed maneuvers.
    Last edited by pffog; 04-02-2009 at 01:26 PM.

  7. #7
    Bob
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    Not the heel Teeny, the whole sole. Her boots are Alpinestars, with a built-up flat sole. The cobbler just runs them through a bandsaw and laminates the extra layer in between the insole and tread, preserving the intended ankle-angle. We joke about it and call them her "Kiss Army" boots, though it's really a very subtle change. Maybe combine that with the factory extra-low seat (if you don't already have it) and you may not have to be on tip-toes. I don't know how tall you are though; she's 5'2" and doesn't feel the need for the extra-low seat, if that helps.

  8. #8
    pinkjacket
    Guest
    I'm going to try a different pair of boots that I wore on my cruiser which have a little bit of thicker sole although they aren't as comfortable, but I'll give it a shot. I do have the lowered seat already but at 5'1" it's still a little too tall. I manuveur the bike very well for the most part as it currently is, but some days it bothers me more than others, especially when the roads are wet.

    Shifting my pelvis and leaning to one side sounds like a good idea. I'll try that when I'm riding this weekend.

    All these ideas will certainly save $$$ instead of trying to lower the bike even further!

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