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Thread: Taking your ride out of storage

  1. #1
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Taking your ride out of storage

    Part of a newsletter from Chicago BMW.

    Recommendations of how to take your bike out of storage and go Touring. It should work as well for other Beemers.

    Springtime Chores

    "Speed Week" is to the motorcyclist what the "Rite of Spring" is to the lawn and garden industry, the sun lotion industry, and the travel business. It's just about here so there are some chores you should consider before you take that first ride of the year.

    Has your motorcycle been in cold storage for three or more months? If so, there are some things you should do before you turn the key. First, check the tire pressure. Chances are it's not up to specs. If you don't have a compressor at home, you might want to buy a simple bicycle pump to do the job. We suggest you never ride on under-inflated tires. Next, check all the lubricants. Top them off if they are low. When you pull out the dipstick, check it carefully to see if there are signs of rust or water. If so, call us to make arrangements to have your bike brought in for springtime service.

    If the lubricant levels are OK then check your battery. Newer batteries are sealed but older ones need to have the acid levels checked. Of course, we're assuming that you've had the battery on a trickle charger so it's still alive. If not, turn on your lights to make sure you've got enough juice. If you don't, you may need a new battery. Juice is OK? Fine, let's continue.

    Did you put a fuel stabilizer in the tank before you put the bike up? If not, you may have a problem. Check the contents of the tank with a flashlight. Obviously, don't use a match or flame. We know someone who did...oops.

    If you're still not too sure, take a gas can to the local gas station and fill it with 91 or higher octane gas and top off the tank. Then rock the bike from side to side to get it to mix with the existing fuel. All set? Let's roll the bike outside and clean it up. Make sure you wipe down the fork legs. You don't want to have the dust work its way inside the sliders.

    Now, you're finally ready. Make sure you're in neutral. Stand beside the bike pull in the clutch lever, turn the key, and start the engine. Did it work? If so, let it warm up for at least five minutes before you ride off. Even then start off slowly and test your brakes before you accelerate to highway speeds. If it didn't work, call us.

  2. #2
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Don't Forget to TCLOCK your ride

    The T-CLOCK Inspection is intended to help you remember how to inspect your motorcycle to make sure it is in safe working condition. The term stands for:
    T - Tires & Wheels
    C - Controls
    L - Lights
    O - Oil
    C - Chassis
    K - Kickstand

    T - Tires and Wheels
    * Tires
    o Condition: thread depth, wear, weathering, evenly seated, bulges, embedded objects.
    o Air Pressure: Check when cold; adjust to load/speed.

    * Wheels
    o Spokes: Bent, broken, missing, tension, check at top of wheel "ring" IK - "thud", loose spoke.
    o Cast: Cracks, dents.
    o Rims: Out of round/true = 5 mm. Spin wheel, index against stationary pointer.
    o Bearings: Grab top and bottom of tire and flex: No freeplay (click) between hub and axle, no growl when spinning.
    o Seals: Cracked, cut or torn, excessive grease on outside, reddish-brown around outside.
    C - Controls
    * Levers
    o Condition: Broken, bent, cracked, mounts tight, ball ends on handlebar level.
    o Pivots: Lubricated.
    * Cables
    o Condition: Fraying, kinks, lubrication: ends and length.
    o Routing: No interference or pulling at steering head, suspension, no sharp angles, wire looms in place.
    * Hoses
    o Condition: Cuts, cracks, leaks, bulges, chaffing, deterioration
    o Routing: No interference or pulling at steering head, suspension, no sharp angles, wire looms in place.
    * Throttle
    o Operation: Moves freely, snaps closed, no revving.
    L - Lights
    * Battery
    o Condition: Terminals, clean and tight, electrolyte level, held down securely.
    o Vent Tube: Not kinked, routed properly, not plugged.
    * Lenses
    o Condition: Cracked, broken, secure, mounted, excessive condensation.
    * Reflectors
    o Condition: Cracked, broken, securely mounted.
    * Wiring
    o Condition: Fraying, chaffing, insulation.
    o Routing: Pinched, no interference or pulling at steering head or suspension, wire looms and ties in place, connectors tight, clean.
    * Headlamp
    o Condition: Cracks, reflector, mounting and adjustment system.
    o Aim: Height and right/left.
    O - Oil
    * Levels
    o Engine Oil: Check warm on centerstand, dipstick, sight glass.
    o Hypoid Gear Oil: Transmission, rear drive, shaft.
    o Hydraulic Fluid: Brakes, clutch, reservoir or sight glass.
    o Coolant: Reservoir and/or coolant recovery tank - cool only.
    o Fuel: Tank or gauge.
    * Leaks
    o Engine Oil: Gaskets, housings, seals.
    o Hypoid Gear: Gaskets, seals, breathers.
    o Hydraulic Fluid: Hoses, master cylinders, calipers.
    o Coolant: Radiator, hoses, tanks, fittings, pipes.
    o Fuel: Lines, fuel taps, carbs.

    C - Chassis
    * Frame
    o Condition: Cracks at gussets, accessory mounts, look for paint lifting.
    o Steering Head Bearings: No detent or tight spots through full travel, raise front wheel check for play by pulling/pushing forks.
    o Swing Arm Bushings/Bearings: Raise rear wheel, check for play by pushing/pulling swing arm.
    * Suspension
    o Forks: Smooth travel, equal air pressure/damping anti-dive settings.
    o Shocks(s): Smooth travel, equal pre-load/air pressure/damping settings, linkage moves freely and is lubricated.
    * Chain or Belt
    o Tension: Check at tightest point.
    o Lubrication: Side plates when hot. Note: Do not lubricate belts.
    o Sprockets: Teeth not hooked, securely mounted.
    * Fasteners
    o Threaded: Tight, missing bolts, nuts.
    o Clips: Broken, missing.
    o Cotter Pins: Broken, missing.

    K - Kickstand
    * Centerstand
    o Condition: Cracks, bent.
    o Retention: Springs in place, tension to hold position.
    * Sidestand
    o Condition: Cracks, bent, (safety cut-out switch or pad if equipped).
    o Retention: Springs in place, tension to hold position.

    Source:

    If you could use a nice checklist to print out - Click Here
    Last edited by PAULBACH; 02-28-2009 at 03:15 AM.

  3. #3
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    I like the Chuck Berry method:

    Workin' in the fillin' station
    Too many tasks
    Wipe the windows, check the tires
    Check the oil - dollar gas! - Ahhh!
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  4. #4
    Mars needs women! 35634's Avatar
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    Beware-in some circles those first nice days in spring are known as the beginning
    of kidney season. Sand, salt, gravel, rusty reflexes all ad up to make many of us
    good donors.
    1987 K75S
    Original litter
    Original owner
    2012 Ural Gear Up

  5. #5
    Unfunded content provider tommcgee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 35634 View Post
    Beware-in some circles those first nice days in spring are known as the beginning
    of kidney season. Sand, salt, gravel, rusty reflexes all ad up to make many of us
    good donors.
    Yeah, I saw at least 20 cruisers on Cape Cod today -- Six of them parked outside a bar.

    There's way too much sand on the road for my taste, despite the 60 degree temps. Good rain coming tonight.
    Salty Fog Rally 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, AND LOOKING FORWARD TO 2014!

    -Tom (KA1TOX)

  6. #6
    Registered User stkmkt1's Avatar
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    What! Some of you actually put your bike in storage! Mine remain at the ready so at a moment's notice I can unplug the Battery Tender, jump on and ride. You never know when you might get a 15 minute window of riding weather, so you need to be ready.

    Seriously, thanks for posting all the great information above. I truly am lucky in that I really can get out every once in a while to take my bike(s) for a spin, so they really do not get "stored." Please everyone be careful when you do head out on the road. I am encountering a lot of gravel, rocks, cinders and potholes. Take your time and enjoy the ride.

  7. #7
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Hi Stkmkt1:

    Stock Market 1? Hmmmm Must be interesting times!

    From Stkmkt1:
    Please everyone be careful when you do head out on the road. I am encountering a lot of gravel, rocks, cinders and potholes. Take your time and enjoy the ride.
    There is also another hazard out there - Salt

    Some more good advice from Chicago BMW:
    Salted bikes
    Salt is corrosive.

    If you do ride close to the coast you'll need to wash your bike more frequently and more thoroughly. You'll also need to make sure your paint has a heavy coating of wax and the chrome and aluminum pieces are well protected too. Aluminum is especially vulnerable to salt corrosion. Most of the OEM aluminum parts have a clear coat over the bare metal, but all too often it's been polished off. Abrasive polishes such as Semichrome do a great job on bare aluminum but offer little salt corrosion protection. If you've been using any form of polish that requires buffing, we suggest you apply as much non-buffing wax as you can. You know the type where you wipe it on, wait for it to turn into a white powder, and then wipe it off.

    If possible, go to a carwash that uses ionized water. We suggest that because there are less electrostatic properties in ionized water, therefore less attraction of salt and the other enemy: sand. Rubber tires running on asphalt roads in high-humidity areas act like electrostatic generators, causing a statically charged bike, which attracts oppositely charged particles of salt and sand.

    If you use a pressure washer, do take care to avoid pointing the wand at the seals on the forks and wheels. The water may well seep past the seals and wash out the lubricants. Use plenty of sudsy soap on both paint and metal parts and be sure to rinse it off. Salt causes corrosion and so do some soaps.

    Salt also dries out tire sidewalls and treads. You can't do much about the tread but you can use some of the special preparations on the sidewalls to help protect their elasticity. If you're not sure, we suggest you stop by our store. We'll be happy to help you select the products you'll need to keep your bike running well and looking good.

  8. #8
    "Running Out The Clock" grafikfeat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PAULBACH View Post
    There is also another hazard out there - Salt
    Back on Long Island I got out on a rare January Day to enjoy a ride.

    Car heading in the same direction as I on Northern State Parkway crossed lanes ahead of me...
    Brief puff of dust was kicked up... As I drove through it my eyes were immediately on fire! That little puff was salt dust and by the time a reached it it was barely visible.
    Yes I had a full face SHOEI on. Made no difference. I had to get off the road... Fast.

    I was well over a 1/4 mile back... I would suggest further if possible.
    Better yet, sealed goggles.
    "Stupidity, if left untreated, is self-correcting."

  9. #9
    Brett
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    Unhook battery tender check tire pressures and go. But of course I do all my maintenance in November before I put it away.

    Brett Endress
    Altoona Pa

  10. #10
    cheesewhiz
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    I was waiting for this thread!
    A sure sign that spring (and riding season) is right around the corner.

    Thanks Paul!


  11. #11
    Rally Rat empeg9000's Avatar
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    Talking Got mine out Friday

    Hey Paul,
    I actually got my RT out on Friday and took it directly to Max BMW for the annual service. I had the battery tender on it and it started right up. It was a wet, messy, sandy road day. By the time I got to Max's the bike was filty and so was my riding gear. Max's promised to give it a wash for me though.

  12. #12
    BMW MOV Club Director ENFOMAN's Avatar
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    Fridays rain washed Salt off of the road and the sun beconed the call, so off I went and glad I did! Not much sand, as salt is the main choice around here, But I was on the lookout in any case. It's the cagers that are out there that rattle me so early.

    Bob

  13. #13
    Registered User
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    Here in Southern New Jersey mice love to spend the Winter in Motorcycle Hotels, Look for nest,,,,,,,some of you may find some.

  14. #14
    Registered User amiles's Avatar
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    The Chicago BMW item previously quoted stated in part;

    Salt also dries out tire sidewalls and treads. You can't do much about the tread but you can use some of the special preparations on the sidewalls to help protect their elasticity. If you're not sure, we suggest you stop by our store. We'll be happy to help you select the products you'll need to keep your bike running well and looking good.

    Since I have been riding, it has been cast in stone that the use of "special preparations on the sidewalls" was a very bad idea.

    Are there new Special Preparations that are suitable for motorcycle tires? OR?

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