Page 1 of 16 1 2 3 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 227

Thread: OK, I bought a barn bike today

  1. #1
    rbleau
    Guest

    OK, I bought a barn bike today

    My first post ! Although I recently joined MOA, my first BMW was a 1960 R60US back in 1972. Well, I retired from Lockheed last November, and I am an amateur wrencher - very amateur. Today I bought a 1977 R100RS that was last registered in 1987. The fuel tank is completely rusted out - it was parked with fuel in it. Otherwise it is complete, including tool kit and bags.

    What should I attack first ? I do not know if the motor is frozen. It has oil in it an I do not see water. Just got it home tonight. unclear how to attach a photo...

    Ready to get some good suggestions as I am sure you folks have "been there already". I elected to put some of my 401k into West German steel and aluminum rather than Wall Street. Thanks / Ron

    1977 R100S - done
    1977 R100/7 - in work at a shop
    1977 R100S - awaiting work
    1977 R100RS - today's bike.

  2. #2
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ballston Spa, NY; South of the Adirondacks, North of the Catskills and West of The Berkshires and Green Mountains
    Posts
    6,822
    Welcome Rbleau


    Looks like you are embarked on a real adventure. You have come to the right place. There will be lots of advice coming along.

    Come back here with stories and pictures as the restoration proceeds.

    Paul

  3. #3
    keelerb
    Guest
    Welcome!

    As for restoration tutorials, you'll find a lot of them out there. CrazyDrummerDudes's "1974 R90/6 never-ending project" thread a few threads down from this one, for example.

    OR:

    http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=22192

    http://penforhire.wordpress.com/

  4. #4
    Airhead krehmkej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    The wet side of Oregon
    Posts
    234
    Disassemble. Inspect and repair or replace as necessary. Reassemble in reverse order.

    Seriously, that's what I did.

    But first - WE NEED PICTURES!
    -jwk-

    1978 R80/7

  5. #5
    Mongrel Owner
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Eastern Ontario
    Posts
    44

    So you like '77s?

    Congratulations on your find. I'm sure you'll get lots of better advice than mine, but I'm just getting into a barn bike (1971 BSA Lightning), as well, so here's what I've learned.
    Patience is your watchword. Dose everything in penetrating oil and then dose it again and let it sit. The quaint old English name for the stuff is "easing oil" and that's exactly what you want to do, ease it.
    Try to turn the engine over by hand, gently, so that you don't bend a pushrod getting it loose. Take the spark plugs out for this, pour in some of your easing oil of choice, leave it for a day to work into the rings. Take off the front cover to get a purchase for turning. When it turns, you might be able to feel any stiffness or gravelly feeling, which of course is bad. If it comes smoothly and you can shift the gears (spin the rear wheel while shifting) and they feel good, then why not change all the fluids, borrow a tank and battery and see if she'll start. That will tell you a lot of what you need to know.
    If it won't turn, then I would suggest you start from the top down, heads, barrels and, finally, the bottom end.
    Watch for water in the transmission.
    There are several good books on restoring old bikes that have a wealth of practical advice, including how to work around a lack of factory tools.
    I have a 1977 RS. I guess '77 must be the best year, no?
    Good luck,
    Tony

  6. #6
    ONE LESS HARLEY 04r1150rs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Bowling Green,KY
    Posts
    335
    DON'T start the bike, if the motor turns I would drop the oil pan and clean it out along w/ the strainer. Gets rid of any sludge that might have accumulated over the years, plus lets you see if anything is obviously wrong. Change all fluids, brakes too, at least drop the fuel bowls, but will most likely need to pull the jets and clean them too. Check fuel lines for clogging (maybe go ahead and replace) and replace fuel filter and clean petcock strainers.
    Richard
    2004 R1150RS
    1984 R80 G/S
    2003 Suzuki DRZ 400S

  7. #7
    rbleau
    Guest
    Good thoughts, Tony. I had been hinking od trying to turn i via the rear wheel....maybe not. Yes, I think 1977 is a very good year. I like double disc brakes, for example. "easing oil" - gotta buy some of that !

    Cheers, and Thanks, Ron

    Quote Originally Posted by TonysR100 View Post
    Congratulations on your find. I'm sure you'll get lots of better advice than mine, but I'm just getting into a barn bike (1971 BSA Lightning), as well, so here's what I've learned.
    Patience is your watchword. Dose everything in penetrating oil and then dose it again and let it sit. The quaint old English name for the stuff is "easing oil" and that's exactly what you want to do, ease it.
    Try to turn the engine over by hand, gently, so that you don't bend a pushrod getting it loose. Take the spark plugs out for this, pour in some of your easing oil of choice, leave it for a day to work into the rings. Take off the front cover to get a purchase for turning. When it turns, you might be able to feel any stiffness or gravelly feeling, which of course is bad. If it comes smoothly and you can shift the gears (spin the rear wheel while shifting) and they feel good, then why not change all the fluids, borrow a tank and battery and see if she'll start. That will tell you a lot of what you need to know.
    If it won't turn, then I would suggest you start from the top down, heads, barrels and, finally, the bottom end.
    Watch for water in the transmission.
    There are several good books on restoring old bikes that have a wealth of practical advice, including how to work around a lack of factory tools.
    I have a 1977 RS. I guess '77 must be the best year, no?
    Good luck,
    Tony
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #8
    rbleau
    Guest
    Thanks, krehmke, and to all I apologize for my fat finger typos in prior reply. Here is a pic. Thanks / Ron

    Quote Originally Posted by krehmkej View Post
    Disassemble. Inspect and repair or replace as necessary. Reassemble in reverse order.

    Seriously, that's what I did.

    But first - WE NEED PICTURES!
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #9
    Airhead krehmkej's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    The wet side of Oregon
    Posts
    234
    Nice machine. It should be a lot of fun getting it into shape. Mine was in similar shape. Count on replacing EVERY piece of rubber. All grease (steering head, wheels, swingarm) will have turned to hard grunge. Inspect your wiring harness very carefully. Look for evidence of rubbing, corrosion and melting, especially below the starter relay (a problem spot on these). Check carbs for correct jets and rebuild them. Brakes are likely needing complete overhaul. Hopefully the master cylinder will save. New hoses, rebuild calipers. Forks will likely need cleaned out and rebuilt as the internal dampers will have turned to sludge. I found Hucky's BMW a good source for ignition, brake and fork parts/kits.

    Ask questions. There are lots of folks here who've been there done that and are willing to share their experience.

    Most important: HAVE FUN!
    -jwk-

    1978 R80/7

  10. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Belton Tx
    Posts
    598
    Before you spend much effort/money pull the oil pan. There was was a case of an old neglected bike posted here a few months ago.

    After much work and an entertaining narrative, he found big chunks of metal in the oil pan. He hasn't posted in a while, but I think he abandoned it.
    Ron

    91 K75RT ABS

  11. #11
    keelerb
    Guest
    Good point Ron. I'd forgotten the perils of "Renegade."

    There's another thread worth looking at - it was captioned "Does this airhead make me an airhead?," and along with some good advice, it may cheer you up if/as you discover problems. They almost certainly won't be as bad as those of Renegade's owner (or as humorous. I'm not laughing at Renegade's owner's ultimate bad luck - we could all feel that pain - just some of the lesser travails along the way) .

  12. #12
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    531

    R 50s

    I have a garage find R 50S and spent the last year cleaning correcting and enjoying the sporty little machine. I would first strip all the plastic off the bike to ensure there are no rodents in residence, remove and clean-out the oil sump, remove and clean valve covers while you inspect and adjust as needed the valves, remove the spark plugs and add a good amount of "Marvel Mystery Oil". While this soaks and does its job remove the carbs and all the air filter plumbing for inspection and cleaning, you should plan on complete carb rebuild. By this time the motor should be free to turn by hand, before you install a good battery you should inspect the wiring harness to ensure the hungry & cold rodents have not chewed it up for a nest or food. Fresh oil, remote starter, carbs removed go ahead and run a quick compression test. Hook up the battery correctly and check the spark with new plugs. Now after all that has checked out good or been corrected put the rebuilt carbs on use a donor gas tank, fresh gas lots of ventilation and crank it up. keep fans on the motor to avoid overheating and run it on the centerstand at vareing speeds for about 30 minutes. check for leaks knocks and other signs of pending doom. Shut it down, let it cool and run another compression check if its decent change the driveline fluids, check the brakes, air-up and check the tire condition if it all loks good ride your still naked RS 100 around the neigborhood for about a half hour (Oh put a good tag on it) then bring it home let it cool and check for leaks, broken stuff and any other potential problems. Give the bike a good cleaning, fresh tires and enjoy it as a riding restoratin project.
    ZEFF

  13. #13
    Old man in the mountains osbornk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Marion VA-In the middle of some of the best riding in the country.
    Posts
    3,279
    My first priority would be to get the engine loosened up. I would remove the plugs and fill the cylinders with oil and let them soak for days. I'm fond of mystery oil. After it has soaked for days, then you can try and turn it. don't force anything. If it doesn't free up, I would remove the heads and try to pull the cylinders so I could clean themn up.
    'You can say what you want about the South, but I almost never hear of anyone wanting to retire to the North.

  14. #14
    Registered User 88bmwjeff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Walnut Creek, CA
    Posts
    2,550
    You've gotten a lot of good advice here on going stem to stern renewing and replacing things as needed. Being a novice wrench, you are bound to run into situations where you will need some advice. Coming here is a great place to get some advice, but there's no substitute for getting some one-on-one advice from someone who knows. If you haven't done already I would join the Airheads group (Airheads.org) and attend some tech days. Between here and the Airhead group, you should hopefully be able to locate a few local gurus who will be more than willing to give you a hand. And, if you've got a few extra $$ you don't mind spending to make a few new friends, you could always host tech day.
    Jeff in W.C.
    1988 R100 RT (the other woman)
    "I got my motorcycle jacket but I'm walking all the time." Joe Strummer

  15. #15
    advrider.com
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,192
    I look forward to watching this one.

    Looks like the bad weather keeps coming, so you've still got time to tear it apart without cutting into prime ride-time.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •