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Thread: GPS, Radar, Heated Clothing Connections

  1. #1
    Registered User 802's Avatar
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    Semper Fi, any chance you could post a diagram of your wiring? I have an '07 RT and would like to add some electronics. Thanks in advance.
    Rich

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    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brprider679 View Post
    I am totally confused as how/what to do in regards to setting up my 1150rt to accept a number of accessories.

    Install a fuse block...


  3. #3
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rich223vt View Post
    Semper Fi, any chance you could post a diagram of your wiring? I have an '07 RT and would like to add some electronics. Thanks in advance.
    Rich
    Rich - see below for what i put together.

    I am triggering the relay from the on board GPS connector (located on the front of the frame) from there i connected a BMW connector (part number provided) and pulled off the VME+ signal to triger the relay.

    The main power of the battery is connected to the relay and the output of the relay will go to the Centech panel. The relay is rated at 70A if i remember correctly

    The Centech panel has both postive and negative terminals so you can concentrate all the wiring there.

    The main ground from the battery goes to the Centech because that is where the heavy current will be flowing. There is a small gauge wire connecting to the relay to provide the ground for the coil in the relay when activated by the VME signal.

    The trigger signal can be piked up from other areas.

    I decided to use the gps connector because i did not have to tap into anything.

    Last edited by Semper_Fi; 03-10-2009 at 12:28 AM.
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    Curmudgeon At Large Bobmws's Avatar
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    The Centech relay triggered fuse panel is a good setup. I have a suggestion of convenience. Wire you GPS so it is hot all the time. Otherwise you will have to go through the start up each time you turn off your bike. GPS is a very low draw and will not drain your battery if you forget to turn it off at the end of a ride. This will also allow you to check & modify a route while stopped without having the key on and everything powered up.
    Bob Weis
    '04 K12RS - Hannigan Hack
    www.earplugco.com

  5. #5
    taller than wide GRANTMACEACHERN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Install a fuse block...


    That's exactly what I wanted to see. I remember you saying a long time ago to go with the BlueSea fuse box. Well, I happened to be in the Genco Marine store on Queens Quay in Toronto and had the block in my hand (same as pictured) but it just looked too big. I decided to wait and go measure to be sure. Well, you've now just showed me it will work. Thanks!
    g r a n t

  6. #6
    Registered User 802's Avatar
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    Smile

    [QUOTE=Semper_Fi;432430]Rich - see below for what i put together.

    Thanks for the discription and the diagram! This is what they mean by "A picture is worth a thousand words."
    RichW
    2007 R12RT
    DS/DS, OEF, OIF

  7. #7
    Registered User 802's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Bobmws;432484]The Centech relay triggered fuse panel is a good setup. I have a suggestion of convenience. Wire you GPS so it is hot all the time.


    That's a good idea, too. Thanks!
    RichW
    2007 R12RT
    DS/DS, OEF, OIF

  8. #8
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    I use the Fuzeblock on my GS to power heated gear, aux lights, and a hot-all-the time pigtail that I can use for a charger. My radar detector, gps, and tire pressure monitor are tied to the accessory socket.



    Small, lots of function. The down side is max 30 amps through the device and a max of 10 amps for any individual circuit. Those limits were not a problem for me.

    // marc

  9. #9
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantMacEachern View Post
    I remember you saying a long time ago to go with the BlueSea fuse box.
    Well, its one of many options.

    What I like about the Blue Sea fuse block...
    • top quality.
    • high current handling ability - max 100 amps total (far more than you need), max 30 amps per circuit.
    • low price - both of mine ran me under CA$30 each at the local chandlery.


    I really like the concept of the FuzeBlocks except for...
    • the user can't remove the cover without unscrewing it to inspect for blown fuses.
    • low current handling ability - max 30 amps total, max 30 amps per side (switched & unswitched), max 10 amps per circuit (should be 15 amps).
    • high price - US$79.95 x 1.3 (present exchange rate) = CA$104 + shipping...Yikes!

    I hope his next version will address those issues.

    The things that draw the most current are driving/fog lights and heated gear. My driving lights draw 9 amps! What if someone wants to install a second set? My Gerbings vest alone draws almost 6 amps! What if someone wants to wear heated chaps/pants as well?

    If you have the same amount of space that I have and if your diagnostic plug is on top of your air filter cover, then you might be able to use the same method I used to install it.
    Last edited by GlobalRider; 03-12-2009 at 10:35 PM.

  10. #10
    taller than wide GRANTMACEACHERN's Avatar
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    For all intents and purposes I know nothing about wiring and electrical. Sure I know how to solder on a spade or ring connection etc, but as far as how to wire up a fuseblock, I wondering:

    Is it necessary to use a relay as illustrated above?
    What is the purpose of the relay?
    How do you know which size of fuse to use for each accessory? Would it be in the product specs? E.g. My Heat troller has in inline fuse of a certain capacity with its wiring harness.

    My impression was that you run a negative line from battery to the fuseblock as well as a positive. Then, Use the other posts to connect in all your auxillary needs that would normally be squeezed for space on your battery posts.

    Tks.
    g r a n t

  11. #11
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantMacEachern View Post
    For all intents and purposes I know nothing about wiring and electrical. Sure I know how to solder on a spade or ring connection etc, but as far as how to wire up a fuseblock, I wondering:

    Is it necessary to use a relay as illustrated above?
    What is the purpose of the relay?
    How do you know which size of fuse to use for each accessory? Would it be in the product specs? E.g. My Heat troller has in inline fuse of a certain capacity with its wiring harness.

    My impression was that you run a negative line from battery to the fuseblock as well as a positive. Then, Use the other posts to connect in all your auxillary needs that would normally be squeezed for space on your battery posts.

    Tks.

    Do you need a relay - No, it is a convience thing - what the relay does is control power to the fuse panel so that when you shut off the bike the relay will become de-energized and take the power off of the fuse panel.

    The advantage of the relay is you can leave items turned on and will not drain the battery if you have a direct to battery connection.

    Fuse selection - the fuse selcted should be at least the same as the current draw for the item to be connected. The manufactuer should have documentation to identify their electrical requirments.

    For example if something is 15amps select a 15amp fuse, 10 for ten 10 etc.

    Don't put something that is not fused rated for one value onto a tap that can provide a higher value, i.e. a 10 onto a 15 - this is to avoid potential damage to that part(s)

    Some electrical items already come fused by the manufacturer - for example Gerbing.

    My gerbing has a built in 15 A fuse so i connected it to a 20 amp tap on the centech, thereby ensureing enough current to support the circuit and also leaving a 15A tap open.
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  12. #12
    taller than wide GRANTMACEACHERN's Avatar
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    Semper_Fi
    Thanks for the info. I really appreciate it! Wish me luck!
    g r a n t

  13. #13
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantMacEachern View Post
    Is it necessary to use a relay as illustrated above? What is the purpose of the relay?
    That was covered but I'll add to it.

    I want my accessories to be "on" after switching off my ignition, so my fuse block is "hot" all the time. Therefore I do not need a relay (which is a switch) inline with my positive cable from the battery to the fuse block.

    I want my GPS to be on when I shut down to look at a map or my GPS. It draws no current, so its not an issue.

    My driving lights can't be turned on even if the ignition is off because I wired my AutoSwitch to a switched circuit (in my Tech Stuff descriptions).

    As for my heated gear, you have to unplug when getting off your motorcycle.


    Quote Originally Posted by GrantMacEachern View Post
    How do you know which size of fuse to use for each accessory?
    1st, a wire size is chosen by the manufacturer (if they supply a harness for driving lights as an example) or by you (if you are wiring an accessory yourself). That wire size is chosen based on the current draw of the device and such that there is no more than a 0.5V drop (in a 14V system) to the device when powered. Every wire has resistance associated with it...run a current through it and you will have less and less voltage along the length of wire. Thicker multi stranded wire has less resistance than thinner wire....which is why your starter cable is so thick...due to the high current draw of the starter (~50 to 100 amps).

    2nd, a fuse is then chosen so that it'll blow before your wiring goes up in smoke causing a fire, in case of a short.

  14. #14
    taller than wide GRANTMACEACHERN's Avatar
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    Again, thanks!
    g r a n t

  15. #15
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantMacEachern View Post
    My impression was that you run a negative line from battery to the fuseblock as well as a positive.
    You got it!

    Go back up to my pic and you'll see a wire with spiral wrap around it exiting the clear cover at the bottom on each side.

    Each wire was 10 gauge (more than you need) and 12" long if I remember with a terminal lug soldered on each end.

    Even though there is absolutely no way the positive cable can short the way it is routed, I placed plastic sprial wrap over each wire (you really don't need it on the negative cable). I didn't insert a fuse in the positive cable for that reason. BMW doesn't fuse the cable running down to the starter or alternator.

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