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Thread: Heated Vest vs. Jacket Liner

  1. #46
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    You all are softies,hehehe! I find the really hard core riders are all wearing vests if anything at all, regarding electrics. I know I ride winter long, nearly every day and all over several states and rarely see other riders, even those of you with those liners on.
    that's just not right! Dang Bears!
    I was glad to have warm arms this morning on the GSA! Headed to be camera bike in San Antonio Marathon. I thought I was hardcore until I wore a vest,then a liner the first time...rode a few years with just the leather on top and wondered what the wires and the fuss was all about. Never giving up the wires! Commuted with and without 'em every day...was nice to have them for days like these.
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    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  2. #47
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Good:)

    I'm amused. Bear arms is a great one,I agree. The 24 reading is good too. I recently had that temp reading on my GSA at "15 degrees" in Marathon ,Texas about three weeks ago. My BMW Dealer told me when I got home that the 15 degree mark is the bottom for this sensor/ computer readout! I thought he was joking, but NO, he was serious. Ice covered my GSA that morning and it did not want to start either. Battery was aok, but I had to coax the engine to life, with a bit of throttle, like "carbed" bikes. The fuel magagement system is not COLD friendly, as I found out in Marathon at 15 degrees. "Zero" would KILL these bikes for sure. Thank goodness for my warm VEST, Randy

  3. #48
    not so retired henzilla's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Polarbear View Post
    I'm amused. Bear arms is a great one,I agree. The 24 reading is good too. I recently had that temp reading on my GSA at "15 degrees" in Marathon ,Texas about three weeks ago. My BMW Dealer told me when I got home that the 15 degree mark is the bottom for this sensor/ computer readout! I thought he was joking, but NO, he was serious. Ice covered my GSA that morning and it did not want to start either. Battery was aok, but I had to coax the engine to life, with a bit of throttle, like "carbed" bikes. The fuel magagement system is not COLD friendly, as I found out in Marathon at 15 degrees. "Zero" would KILL these bikes for sure. Thank goodness for my warm VEST, Randy
    Have had same results in Marathon and Alpine with frost on things...the Hexheads do not like the cold and was afraid it wouldn't start. I wasn't the only one either. I do wonder what a colder morning than 20 degrees would do. 20/50 oil not thin enough?

    I guess that flashing snowflake means STAY OFF?
    Steve Henson
    SABMWRA MOA Club#62's Flat Fixer/ current forum moderator
    It's not the breaths you take, but the moments that take your breath away-D.Dillon/G. Strait

  4. #49
    Polarbear Polarbear's Avatar
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    Sw Texas:)

    The other "COLD" state, "not" in the North US of A! Let it be said, Texan's can have brutal cold weather and "vests or liners" ARE required in the AM hours, even as far south as the Mex.Border of Texas. Of course, I hit there during a really cold week, but clear skies. Really good riding and all should go there, SW Texas winter... Good times, Randy.

  5. #50
    67-year-old Teenager indygt's Avatar
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    Gerbings will wire your liner

    Here's a story I wrote for RoadBike a few years ago. I assume Gerbings still offers this service. The referenced prices, of course, are out of date:
    Get Wired!
    By John M. Flora
    So there we were, weaving up past the tree line on MontanaÔÇÖs Beartooth Pass in the crisp morning air. My riding companions looked like clones of the Michelin man, bulked up with every sweater and extra Henley they could scrounge from their saddlebags. One guy even had his rainsuit on in an effort to put another layer between his skin and the cold mountain air. I, on the other hand, wore only a T-shirt under my Firstgear TKO jacket and liner. Yet, I was perfectly comfortable. Toasty warm, even.
    As we neared the summit, riding between shoulder-high, stark, white snow banks, my gloved left hand found the little black knob peeking out of my tank bag and gave it a quarter-turn clockwise. In a moment, I felt a new wave of welcome heat spread out across my back and engulf my arms. ÔÇ£Ahhhh, thatÔÇÖs better!ÔÇØ I thought, turning my attention to the next switchback.
    You see, I hate being cold. But I also hate giving up valuable space in my saddlebags to bulky sweaters, fleece layers, or other extra garments that IÔÇÖll only need when it gets really brisk. When I bought my Firstgear jacket a few years ago, I found the ideal solution with the help of the folks at GerbingÔÇÖs Heated Clothing.
    Most of us are familiar with GerbingÔÇÖs popular line of heated jackets, pants, full-body suits, clothing liners, socks, and gloves. But did you know that Gerbing also will wire the removable liner of your favorite jacket?
    ÔÇ£We donÔÇÖt promote it,ÔÇØ said Bob Gerbing, discussing the custom wiring offered by the company. ÔÇ£But we gladly do it.ÔÇØ
    The company charges $169 to wire your jacket liner, and thereÔÇÖs no extra charge for a pull-up mandarin collar. If you like, theyÔÇÖll include plugs in the wrists to connect to heated gloves for no extra charge. TheyÔÇÖll also wire a vest for $129, and you can get your favorite pair of lined gloves wired for $79. ÔÇ£As long as thereÔÇÖs an inner liner, we can wire them,ÔÇØ Bob explained.
    The turnaround time for wiring jobs is usually about 7 to 10 days from the receipt of your gear. However, Bob told me that when ÔÇ£people have special requests and need something quick because theyÔÇÖre going on vacation, we try to expedite the order to accommodate them.ÔÇØ
    Besides the heated garments and custom wiring work, GerbingÔÇÖs offers a variety of ways to connect to your bikeÔÇÖs electrical system. The cheapest is the simple $12 on/off switch, but the best solution is one of their electronic thermostats. These devices are actually timers, which meter out measured waves of heat every few seconds, drawing just enough current to maintain the desired level of heat. You can choose from two portable controllers ($59 each), which slip into a pocket or a tank bag. A permanent unit ($69) can be mounted on a motorcycle fairing.
    BobÔÇÖs father, Gordon Gerbing started the heated clothing business 25 years ago. It began as a sideline to the machine shop he ran in the little town of Union at the eastern base of WashingtonÔÇÖs Olympic Peninsula. His original product was a one-piece heated suit.
    For several years, his business grew by word of mouth ÔÇô one satisfied customer at a time. In 1988, Gordon quit the machine shop and went full time into heated clothing for motorcyclists. Around 1990, he and his wife Marilyn hit the road to promote the product line. Gordon became a familiar fixture on the motorcycle rally circuit. ÔÇ£HeÔÇÖd fly to a city and sleep in his rental car,ÔÇØ Bob recalled. ÔÇ£He promoted from the ground up.ÔÇØ
    The company is still a family business. ÔÇ£Mom and Dad are both 70, but they still work here,ÔÇØ said Bob, who is in charge of quality control. BobÔÇÖs brother Jeff is vice president, and JeffÔÇÖs wife, Dottie, is the company secretary. And a small group of sales representatives (often including one or more Gerbings) hit the big events like Americade, Daytona, and Sturgis, as well as lots of brand-specific rallies.
    GerbingÔÇÖs recently got a major boost, when the company signed a contract with Harley-Davidson to manufacture HarleyÔÇÖs heated clothing. ÔÇ£The new Softail is so smooth that Harley riders can take even longer trips and really need the heated clothes now,ÔÇØ Bob said, chuckling that the contract ÔÇ£is DadÔÇÖs plum prize. HeÔÇÖs been working toward it for years.ÔÇØ
    While the Gerbing business on Dalby Road is essentially a factory, Bob said they welcome drop-in customers. ÔÇ£We have a rack of clothes in the hallway office. WeÔÇÖre open from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekdays and by appointment on weekends. If somebody wants to come out on the weekend, weÔÇÖll open up the shop for them. A lot of people have to work during the week, so weÔÇÖre happy to help them.ÔÇØ
    So, the next time you try and cram lots of bulky layers onto your bike for an extended ride through several temperature zones, consider your options. WouldnÔÇÖt it be nice to take just your jacket liner and leave the other stuff home?



    GerbingÔÇÖs Heated Clothing
    D 750 Dalby Road, Dept. MT&C
    Union, WA 98592
    800/646-5916
    www.gerbing.com

  6. #51
    Registered User Greg_K's Avatar
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    While a jacket liner is warmer, I actually prefer a vest. I have more freedom of movement and it packs better than a jacket liner. I might have a different view if I was on a bike with less wind protection than my RT though.
    '04 R1150RT

    No matter where you go, there you are!

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