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Thread: Question about Epoxy

  1. #1
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
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    Question about Epoxy

    At the link below:

    Would somebody please 'splain to me about Epoxy?

    Thanks in advance,
    Rick
    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

    If you insist on exercising a right to burn our flag, first be so kind as to wrap yourself in it and then douse yourself with gasoline just before you strike the match.

  2. #2
    Rbike
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    What don't those posts 'splain?

  3. #3
    What's that noise...? basketcase's Avatar
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    Well, since I ride a K bike, I originally posted on the K Forum. However, epoxy is not just a model specific issue, and we don't have a general purpose tech board.

    So, I went back later and posted the link at the other forums.

    TADA! My "how to stick it tight" education is under way.

    '98 BMW Z3 Roadster, '00 R1100RT

    If you insist on exercising a right to burn our flag, first be so kind as to wrap yourself in it and then douse yourself with gasoline just before you strike the match.

  4. #4
    Rbike
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    O'tay...then my guess as to why your epoxy did not set up is that it was either old or not mixed in the right ratio or not stirred up enough.

    So maybe try some new epoxy without putting it on the parts. Start by mixing it and waiting to see if it hards correctly. If it comes out right, then repeat on the parts you're trying to fix.

  5. #5
    Having fun Keith's Avatar
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    Some stuff about epoxy

    Rick:

    Sheesh, where do I begin?

    1. OK, it's best to NOT put epoxy in the sun to harden. It'll harden just fine at room temp.

    2. Epoxy, in its various brands and forms, seems to stick better to a rough surface. Therefore, for instance, if you're glueing two smooth pieces together you should sand them with 220 grit wet/dry paper to give the mating surfaces a little "tooth".

    3. Epoxy stirring sticks and spreading spatulas are made of plastic. Why? Because some plastics, like those used, don't give epoxy much chance to stick. That is why the stirring sticks are reusable. The message here is that not all plastics can be glued with epoxy.

    4. Most good epoxies don't age badly in the container waiting to be used. Good epoxies will still be usable after 5-10 years. If you're in doubt, mix up a little dab and see if it's still good.

    5. Proportions should be followed pretty closely, but the pros will add a little more hardener for a quick cure and add a little less hardener to extend pot life. We amateurs have been known to do that too, and with a quality epoxy the results are as you might expect. It really works!

    6. The symptoms you have described are familiar to me, but I've only experienced this with the POLYESTER resins and crappy epoxy. I used some POR-15 epoxy a few years back, and it didn't perform well at all.

    7. I realy like West Systems epoxy. I've found that it is very good and it is thin. Let me explain this: "Hardware store" epoxies, like Devcon, are thickened at the factory. This allows you to put a glob of it on something and not have it run off like water. All of the hardwares store epoxies are thickened to something that the manufacturer had determined to work best for the average consumer. Most of them now come in easy-to-dispense double tubes. West Systems (and System 3) epoxies are thinner. This makes them soak into porus materials better. West sells several types of thickeners (microfibers, tiny plastic bubbles, etc.) that you can use with the mixed epoxy to get it to the thickness you need. You can find out more about their products here. Start out with some 105 resin, some 206 hardener (or 207), the right set of mini pumps for dispensing, some stirring sticks (worth the money), and some paper coffee cups from the grocery store. Don't forget gloves!

    8. Your particular repair seems to be slowly hardening. If it continues to harden, it may be okay soon. I remember one repair I did to a paper shredder container with poly resin that took months to fully cure... it was ok to use in a couple of weeks. Experiences like those drove me away from the less expensive polyester resins. What a hassle. When they fully cure, you're good to go.

    9. Did I mention gloves? I use nitrile. Exposure to epoxy will cause sensitivity to epoxy. Glop it all over your hands, and someday you won't be able to use epoxy. It's a progressive thing, and once you're sensitized to epoxy, it's apparently for life. Wear gloves!

    10. JB Weld is also a really good epoxy, and it's machineable. The recommended thickener is time, and it takes a good 24 hours to cure. Mix, wait 15-20 minutes, and apply.

    11. Once you play around with epoxy some, you will find lots of good uses and applications for it. (All the more reason to wear those gloves!) If you get some where you don't want it, acetone will help with cleanup. Hoppe's #9 also works well, but acetone is cheaper.

    12. Bonus: if you like sticking things together, check out the Dual lock from 3M. I'm going to try to redo a motorcycle seat in the next few months, and I'll be putting it back on the seat pan with Dual lock.

    Hope this helps a little
    Keith

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