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Thread: Tire pressure guages

  1. #1
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    Tire pressure guages

    I'm a new owner of a K12LT. I need to purchase a tire pressure guage. What do you suggest?

  2. #2
    Registered User texanrt's Avatar
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    Tire gauge info

    http://www.getagauge.com/DialTireGauges.cfm

    I've used this accu-gauge dial for a few years. It has brass parts and can be ordered with a swivel chuck and rubber case. It includes a bleed valve for convenient pressure adjustments and it holds the current pressure reading until you open the bleed valve.
    Texan RT | Houston | IBA
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  3. #3
    Registered User mistercindy's Avatar
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    For your tank bag or your garage?

    For my tank bag I just have an old fashioned "pen" version. I also have a cool digital one which cost $20 and was great, but then the battery died in the middle of nowhere and I decided "never again." That, and the pen variety costs less than $5 so, even though I've used the same one now for years, if it gets lost on the road its no big deal.

    For my garage I have a nice analogue gauge made by Accu-Gage. It has a connector that allows for easy and difficult to reach valves, a fairly long (12"?) hose between the gauge and the connector, and an air release valve. The air release valve is darn handy: fill it to a bit more than you need then bleed it down while you watch the gauge. Makes life very easy. You should be able to buy its equivalent at any auto parts store for $25 or less.
    Grant
    '05 R1200GS
    Former owner of an '03 R1150R
    BMWMOA #113847

  4. #4
    Registered User MOTOR31's Avatar
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    Go to the parts store of your choice. Pick out 2 and buy them. You might want to go to a tire store and ask to check them against their "master" gage. Use the more accurate one and toss the other.
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  5. #5
    Bob
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    Don't forget you'll get a fancy digital one in that silly "BMW owners kit" later on.
    (I would wait that long to check, though.)

  6. #6
    Extra pieces? geobeemer's Avatar
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    I never got a "BMW owners kit". When did that start?
    2000 K1200LT
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  7. #7
    Bob
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeoBeemer View Post
    I never got a "BMW owners kit". When did that start?
    I don't know. They sent my wife one for buying her "leftover" '07 F800ST this year.
    It's a heavy package that shows up at your doorstep weeks or months after purchase, with a nicely boxed set of mostly useless bookshelf knick knacks, and the tire pressure guage.

  8. #8
    Rob Mayes
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    I would like to say I am smart enough to just kick my tire or look for a bulge, but I am not. I have both a dial and several pencil guages. I have not seen any real difference in accuracy. What I do that is different is that I keep the tire to the maximum pressure as stamped on the side of every tire.

  9. #9
    American Idiot noyooper's Avatar
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    Go with the "pen" type...

    +1 on the "pen" type, any time I see a review, either in MCN or Consumer reports, they are typically at the top of the ratings... Keep the K.I.S.S. principle in mind.

  10. #10
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Go to www.bestrestproducts.com and buy the Cycle Pump Gauge.
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
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    BMWBAGBY
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RJM2096 View Post
    I would like to say I am smart enough to just kick my tire or look for a bulge, but I am not. I have both a dial and several pencil guages. I have not seen any real difference in accuracy. What I do that is different is that I keep the tire to the maximum pressure as stamped on the side of every tire.
    you are certainly free to do that Rob, BUT that number on the side is considered to be the maximum the tire can handle, not the amount you should ride with! Unless you always ride 2up, saddlebags fully loaded, tankbag maxed, & kitchen sink strapped to the back (basically, riding at or beyond the GVWR_.. you are not doing yourself any favors. The ride is harsher, handling suffers, grip/traction (that thing that keeps us attached to the road) is severely compromised, and tire longevity actually decreases when you do so.
    proceed at your own risk- but speaking as a "safety professional" (MSF RiderCoach), you really should not promote this practice to others. im(not so)ho, of course.
    Ride Safe, Ride Lots

  13. #13
    Registered User greenwald's Avatar
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by bikerfish1100 View Post
    you are certainly free to do that Rob, BUT that number on the side is considered to be the maximum the tire can handle, not the amount you should ride with! Unless you always ride 2up, saddlebags fully loaded, tankbag maxed, & kitchen sink strapped to the back (basically, riding at or beyond the GVWR_.. you are not doing yourself any favors. The ride is harsher, handling suffers, grip/traction (that thing that keeps us attached to the road) is severely compromised, and tire longevity actually decreases when you do so.
    proceed at your own risk- but speaking as a "safety professional" (MSF RiderCoach), you really should not promote this practice to others. im(not so)ho, of course.
    DITTO!
    Kevin Greenwald - Touring Tips Editor
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    MSF RiderCoach # 121656 (BRC,SBRC,IS,IME,SMARTrainer)
    Motorcycle/Driving Instructor - ROAD AMERICA Race Track

  14. #14
    Registered User dancogan's Avatar
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    MCN tested a bunch of gauges a while back and they found the diigital one sold by Radio Shack was quite accurate. I like the fact that it not only shows the tire pressure, it also speaks it!
    Dan

  15. #15
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenwald View Post
    Go to www.bestrestproducts.com and buy the Cycle Pump Gauge.
    I agree! It's called the "EZ Air" and I carry one in each bike. I got the first one I bought for Voni, after she had an exercise she calls "changing the air in her tires" at a truck stop with one of those long stemmed truck chucks. With the EZ air you clip the hose end to the valve stem and add air about a foot away at the gauge. Air bleed button too. No more wrestling matches with awkward air chucks on stiff hoses, trying to find a way to get past the brake disk and still align the thing with the valve stem.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
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