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Thread: lightweight camping gear

  1. #16
    Locksmith Extraordinaire RACEYDOG's Avatar
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    This link is to the Zeus 3 which is the largest of the three sizes. If you want one smaller (and cheaper) they also have the Zeus 1 and 2. They pack small and set up easy.

    http://www.moontrail.com/eureka-zeus3.php
    2007 R1200RT - Gadgetmobile (sold)
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  2. #17
    Registered User xp8103's Avatar
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    Theo,
    Not sure why you feel you have to pack light? The K75 will haul plenty of gear and rider without having to compromise anything. When my wife and I camp, she takes only her sleeping bag and thermarest pad along with her clothes. I take everything else, the 3 person tent, my bag and pad, clothes, accessories, shoes, food stuffs and food accessories and the K doesn't even notice.
    Nik #140220 - '88 K75C | '96 R1100RS | '77 R100RS | '06 DL650
    '01 525iT (oOO=00=OOo)

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  3. #18
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    We travel two up with camping gear, so we're sensitive to bulk as much as weight. We've not found a better sleeping solution than Big Agnes equipment. The pad compacts down to about 6"x3". Additionally, it slides into a pocket in the back of the sleeping bag so you don't slide off of it. The sleeping bags are backpacking bags and compress down to about the size of a loaf of bread, but are rated to +15.

    For a tent, we're using a Mountain Hardwear Haven 3, which weighs not much more than a few pounds. It also compresses nicely, especially when we load it into a compression sack.

    If you're looking for truly lightweight gear that is weatherproof, check the local backpacking store. We managed to score all our stuff at REI. It's not cheap, but when you're warm and dry during a winter rainstorm, you won't be thinking about the money.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  4. #19
    DirtKnob SCOTTGLOVER's Avatar
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    Smile Light weight Camp Gear

    Pack'er up as if you had no home. Keep some gear light to make room for Food, Water and Bier. Go out and have an Adventure!!!!
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  5. #20
    Seattle-area Rounder OfficerImpersonator's Avatar
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    Go to your local REI, EMS, or equivalent. Avoid the cheap crap at Wally-World and other discount retailers. High quality = low weight = high prices = durability. If it's designed to be back-packed, you can be sure it's light weight. Go with name brands like MSR, Mountain Hardware, The North Face, REI's house brand, Big Agnes, Black Diamond, etc.

    Do you want to spend $100 each year for a new Wal-Mart tent, or do you want to spend $200 for a tent that lasts a decade or more?

    I never understand why people don't factor replacements cost into their decision matrix when buying cheap crap at Wally-World or equivalent. I do a lot of camping at music festivals, and I see people who fly into town for the event, hit Wal-Mart for some gear on their way to the show, and then spend the long weekend watching their cheap stuff disintegrate over just a couple of days.
    Seattle, WA
    2012 R1200GSA
    2002 R1150RT-P
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  6. #21
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OfficerImpersonator View Post
    Go to your local REI, EMS, or equivalent. Avoid the cheap crap at Wally-World and other discount retailers. High quality = low weight = high prices = durability. If it's designed to be back-packed, you can be sure it's light weight. Go with name brands like MSR, Mountain Hardware, The North Face, REI's house brand, Big Agnes, Black Diamond, etc.

    Do you want to spend $100 each year for a new Wal-Mart tent, or do you want to spend $200 for a tent that lasts a decade or more?

    I never understand why people don't factor replacements cost into their decision matrix when buying cheap crap at Wally-World or equivalent. I do a lot of camping at music festivals, and I see people who fly into town for the event, hit Wal-Mart for some gear on their way to the show, and then spend the long weekend watching their cheap stuff disintegrate over just a couple of days.
    +100000000000000

    In 1995, we spent about $300, an exorbitant sum at the time, on our first Mtn. Hardwear tent. We still have it and have probably spent a couple hundred nights in it. I've only gotten wet in it one time and that was because I set up in a low spot, not because the tent leaked.

    It's a 4 season expedition tent and it weighs a bit more than our newer Haven, but when the weather is cold and expected to be miserable, I know I can rely on it to keep us warm and dry. Having a nice vestibule with a window that I can cook in is a huge bonus, as well. There's nothing like waking up, making breakfast and sitting in our sleeping bags for a while enjoying the morning while it's cold or crummy outside.

    We coughed up the big money (well, kind of big) for Big Agnes bags and pads a few years ago. Even camping in 15F, I've yet to be anything close to cold in it.

    You have three prime objectives when camping; staying warm, dry and well fed. I'm happy to make sure all of those are most easily and efficiently met by starting with great gear. I've suffered through interminable nights, shivering in my damp sleeping bag because of cruddy gear. There's nothing longer than a night like that and going through one of those nights will remove any flinch when you buy the good stuff.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  7. #22
    RIDERR1150GSADV
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    Talking

    you may want to look at some Exped gear and Nemo tents. Light weight and comfy to use, while offering excellent value. I like the Exped matress better than the Thermarest, as it is lighter and warmer while packing quite a bit smaller. IMHO Mountain Hardwear is no longer what it once was. I had a tent from them and it fell apart after 2 seasons. I had send it in for repair and they never did anything so it fell apart on my trip last year to AK.
    You get what you pay for.... Look at www.moontrail.com for info on gear as they have plenty of photos of the tents they sell. No affiliation etc..

  8. #23
    Registered User BernieEcht's Avatar
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    I bought 2 Exped mattresses for our trip to the MOA Rally this year. Take as much space as one Therma-rest and provides twice as much comfort. Plus has the pump built in. Made my wifes first camping experience a good one.
    I can also recommend the Hoodoo3 from REI. Packs small.
    Bernie Echt
    Jacksonville, FL
    2007 R1200RT Double Silver, 2000 R11RT sold (103K)
    MOA#92589, BMWNEF, BMW Outriders, BMW-RA, AMA

  9. #24
    Registered User
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    I was getting to buya Big Alice 3.5" air mattress. It packs way smaller than my Thermarest and is thicker. Do you know how the Exped compares to the Big Alice?

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