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Thread: When did I learn...? Practical tips for all riders.

  1. #61
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Another reason to stay away from the back of large trucks and semi's is the turbulence they leave behind.

    On full fairing bikes RT GT Golwing ( i can speak to these) you can acutally feel the porposing effects of the wind disturbance

    If you HAVE to follow a truck/semi I usually stay back 4-5 car lengths and then I pass at the earliest opportunities
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
    2009 G450X White
    IBA #35651
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  2. #62
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Re-Tread Truck tires

    Beware of trucks with re-treads - safely assume they all have them

    These tend to blow off rather loudly and have several effects

    1 - makes the truck driver swerve to "catch" the trailer

    2 - will leave a large tire carcass or big bits that will hurt you if you are in proximity of the event

    3 - are incredibly loud and frightening.

    4 - usually happens in the warmer months or warmer areas - based on load and road conditions - I use to travel 20(E/W) alot and they are all over the place in the summer

    When I pass a truck it is always as far left as possible - one is for the turbulence, the other is if the tires goes.

    I got to see one go off - was in a car and that was a shock especially avoiding a 6 foot long chunk of rubber dancing about in the lane
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
    2009 G450X White
    IBA #35651
    Rogue Moderator

  3. #63
    RTFlyer
    Guest
    Always make the guy who chews tobacco ride in the rear of the group.

    ...and on the truck tires thing. Ever hear that whappita-whapitta-whappita sound coming from a truck as you gain on it?? That's the sound of one flat on a dual wheel. Get the hell out of there fast. It's only a matter of time.

  4. #64
    2old2rockNroll
    Guest
    be careful when crossing wet railroad tracks at an acute angle....same on cattle guards

    use your *rear* brakes when going down a steep gravel driveway

    carry something to clean your visor with...dusk is a bad time to be smeary

    if your bike falls over, back up to it, squat, get your arms under and lift with your legs

    don't flip off cage drivers even if they try to kill you, it's impolite

    Don't ride at night (this is a personal rule, some people have great night vision)

    keep your feet on the pegs unless you're stopped
    Last edited by 2old2rockNroll; 03-06-2010 at 05:43 AM. Reason: kant speill 2 gud

  5. #65
    Grow'd up Mini Trail munchy's Avatar
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    Any one suggest this one? When getting back onto asphalt after a dirt ride, remember to turn your ABS back on. DAMHIK.

    2002 R1150GS
    MOA #104910, Twisted Shaft Motorcycle Club #241

  6. #66
    dbriggs2000
    Guest
    Great tips...when changing lanes for any reason, always maintain or slightly increase speed when easing into the new lane. It's hard to gauge the speed of vehicles that are behind you, especially at night.

  7. #67
    rabid reader dbrick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by From MARS View Post
    Even though a vehicle is stopped at a cross road, flash your highbeam several times. It lets them know you see them and makes you more visible.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    As you approach intersections that have stopped cars, alternating pushes of the handlebars make your headlights and presence more noticeable to those who might not otherwise notice you.
    Flashing high beams don't mean "Watch out - I'm here!" to all drivers. Sometimes, these signals are intepreted as "I see you - go ahead." It is not good to have a cager misinterpret your signal. For that reason, I don't do this.

    Headlight modulators flicker constantly, and are not misinterpreted in this manner. You don't have to use a modulator - I do - but the single or double headlight flash can be an invitation to a party you don't want to attend.
    David Brick
    Santa Cruz CA
    2007 R1200R

  8. #68
    MAYLETT
    Guest
    When I'm on my bike, I adopt the paranoid assumption that every car and truck on the road is being driven by an angry, blind, drunken half-wit with a mean streak and holding a grudge. With that in mind, I keep my distance from them all. In other words...
    • I always look for an escape route and never pick the middle lane (it leaves enemies on both sides).
    • Gravel trucks are rolling cluster bombs whose purpose is to pelt me with shrapnel.
    • When stopped behind an enemy at a light, I always leave enough room to bolt to the side since the sadistic fool ahead of me will likely shift into reverse in an attempt to kill me.
    • Four-way stops are actually ambush zones.
    • Truck tires are pneumatic explosive devices with motorcycle proximity sensors carefully calibrated to blow if I get too close.
    • I never hesitate since it shows weakness and invites attack.
    • I never mistake eye contact as anything other than what it really means ÔÇö they're aiming directly at me.

    And most important, I always keep a cool and clear head since it gives me a strategic advantage over the crazed lunatics around me.

  9. #69
    Registered User mistercindy's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Good thread.

    When parking, I put the kickstand down, and lean the bike on the kickstand so its holding the full weight of me and the bike before getting off. That way I KNOW the kickstand is down and I'm not going to have a parking lot lay down. (Guess how I acquired this habit...)

    Always park at or near the front of a parking space. If you park too far back people don't see the bike and think the space is empty and may drive (or ride) in too fast and hit the bike. (Happened to a friend of mine.)

    Others have said this, and its true. When I decide to pass I do so aggressively. Like Napoleon said: "If you start to take Vienna, take Vienna."

    When on dirt, an old beat up hockey puck makes a cheap and effective kickstand support.

    The easiest way to determine whether a car is creeping forward or stopped is to look at its hubcaps.
    Grant
    '05 R1200GS
    Former owner of an '03 R1150R
    BMWMOA #113847

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