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Thread: When did I learn...? Practical tips for all riders.

  1. #46
    IBA #44567 Ken F's Avatar
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    Keep a partial roll of toilet paper somewhere on your bike.
    IBA #44567
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    -Albert Eienstein

  2. #47
    criminaldesign
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    Quote Originally Posted by 460Jetboat View Post
    Even if it's dark, don't roll your sleeping bag out on an ant hill.

    460
    branching out...

    picnic tables make decent beds

  3. #48
    Rally Rat CATHDEAC's Avatar
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    There are old pilots
    There are bold pilots
    There are NO old, bold pilots.

    Those who too often trust in luck and time,
    often run out of both simultaneously.

    When observing a windscreen or helmet shield, stare at bug remnants carefully and say.. "Bugs don't squish like that at 55!" (told to me by my Uncle back in 1974 when that was the national speed limit.)

    Don't sucker your riding buddy into following you into a dangerous place or turn.

    Don't be a riding buddy of someone who will sucker you into a dangerous place or turn.

    LOOK where you are going... do not vapor lock on the old cemetary... the view only changes by season.

    Don't follow directly behind another MC... debris can be picked up and thrown.

    If you must ride directly behind another MC.. max your separation and separate quickly.

    All is not lost... only me.

    This is my motorcycle
    There are many like it
    But this one is mine
    I will care for it
    As I care for myself
    I must master myself
    Before I master my motorcycle
    So that when asked
    Both may be trusted

    If I have to explain, you'll never understand..

    "The ride" is not a momentary experience...
    There is preparation
    There is action
    There are memories
    If done well, the memories will be mine

  4. #49
    Still plays with trains. tinytrains's Avatar
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    When riding with anyone you don't really know and trust, agree on a meeting place. That way if they like to ride faster than you are comfortable with, or just do foolish things, you can just meet them there.

    Learned that the hard way 30 years ago.

    Scott
    1988 K75 Low Seat
    2009 R1200R Roadster

  5. #50
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
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    Keep your head on a swivel always know what is around you.

    If a vehicle passes you that you did not know was there count yourself lucky that nothing occurred.

    Look through the car in front of you. Is there something there that can make for a sudden stop?

  6. #51
    Registered User LENRT1200ST's Avatar
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    Follow your blocker!

    I've not seen this mentioned, but I have a tip that has saved my bacon a number of times.

    This is not the perfect example, but if I'm making a right turn from a stop and there is a big rig making a left from the left hand turn lane as well... I'll wait until he makes his move, because any oncoming traffic will have to plow through him to hit me.

    I call it blocking. And, I find these situations where I'm safer if I use other vehicles in motion and/or static to block and avoid a crash w/ another vehicle.

    I don't know where this idea originated or how I first realized its effectiveness, but after I realized I was doing it, I could see the advantage and found myself doing it unintentionally.

    Some might include this in the "safe riding space" line of defensive riding.

    Len
    Last edited by lenrt1200st; 02-19-2010 at 02:10 PM.

  7. #52
    From MARS
    Guest
    This one I learned the hard way: Leaning into a gust of wind is the same as leaning into a curve, and if done on a gravel surface, may have the same result!
    Tom

  8. #53
    RSPENNACHIO
    Guest
    Confucius says, it is not wise to do a burn-out on a motorcycle that has linked brakes. For you see, as you squeeze the front brake lever you are also applying the rear brake -the only thing that you are smoking are your clutch plates and not your rear tire.
    Last edited by rspennachio; 02-17-2010 at 04:00 PM. Reason: grammer

  9. #54
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lenrt1200st View Post
    I've not seen this mentioned, but I have a tip that has saved my bacon a number of times.

    This is not the perfect example, but if I'm making a right turn from a stop and there is a big rig making a left from the left hand turn lane as well... I'll wait until he makes his move, because any oncoming traffic will have to plow through him to hit me.

    I call it blocking. And, I find these situations where I'm safer if I use other vehicles in motion and/or static to block and avoid a crash w/ another vehicle.

    I don't know where this idea originated or how I first realized its effectiveness, but after I realized I was doing it, I could see the advantage and found myself doing it unintentionally.

    Some might include this is the "safe riding space" line of defensive riding.

    Len
    Actually I use this technique quite often.

    My town has two rotaries and it is a very effective technique.
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
    2009 G450X White
    IBA #35651
    Rogue Moderator

  10. #55
    Registered User
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    When Did I Learn That? - The Animal Edition

    1) It is amazingly easy to run a pick play on a dog using a parked car.

    2) If you think it might be hard to spot a Black Angus bull on a dark asphalt road on a moonless night, think again. Its actually harder than that.

    3) Cow moose on a dirt road won't get out of your way until they're damn good and ready and won't even turn around to see who's honking. So save your horn for something useful- like waking your rally neighbors.

    4) A sparrow banging off your bike rarely even leaves feathers but a grouse-hit on your shoulder at 60 mph really gets your attention.

    5) Deer are about as predictable as your S.O. So, if you think you've got the latter down, be sure not to slow down when you see one.

    6) In certain parts of the world both squirrels and crows eating road kill enjoy playing chicken with motorcycles. It does not take a camera crew filming a commercial to provoke this behavior.

    7) A 2 stroke dirt bike is the best "call" for rabbit hunting that has ever been invented.

    8) I'm not sure about armadillos but 'possums are clearly born suicidal.

    9) Fish are not likely to run into my bike. Everything else might.


    Details on request.....

  11. #56
    BeemerBoy terham's Avatar
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    I always tell new riders, learn to use the front brake. Find an empty parking lot and practice, practice, practice. When I started riding I was a little afraid of the front brake but after a couple of experiences where I barely had enough stopping distance, I thought I'd give it a try and my stopping distances came down. I use the front brake much more than the rear.

    Practice countersteering. You do it subconsciously, but if you do it consciously, it's even more effective I think. Practice in the same parking lot where you're practicing front braking.

    Already mentioned, but turn your head and look through the curve and as far up the road as possible and your bike will follow.
    Terence
    R75/5 R100RS K100RS R1100S

  12. #57
    Atomic City Boxer 154048's Avatar
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    I added a set of 'fisheye' convex mirror 'spots' onto my rearviews and really value them. My experience is that 'if you don't see it there, it ain't there". I still do a head swivel before a lane change, but sometimes when you have to do a quickie switch, a glance in the mirror is faster and safer...

    Of course, a guy needs to do Frequent checks to the rear as I found out last week when a car blew past me that I never knew was there...cuz I didn't look.
    Steve in Santa Fe
    1980 R100RT
    2005 DR 650

  13. #58
    Kbiker BCKRider's Avatar
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    Smile

    Hey Steve, I got pummeled some time ago for suggesting that "blind spot" mirrors were quicker, hence better, than head checks. Glad you revived the topic.

    Critics of my opinion made two very valid points: 1) headlights in mirrors are difficult to judge at night. If you ride at night - I don't - you should before changing lanes make a head check. You should also add a second or two of following distance to allow for this time your eyes are not on the road ahead. 2) No "blind spot" mirror will tell you if there is a vehicle two lanes over that may be moving into the same place you covet. Definitely something to remember when you ride multi-lane freeways with two or more lanes to either side of your position. A head check before a lane change is again definitely in order.

    The good news, I believe, is that with practice a half-second glance to the center of your mirror will tell you if there is a car behind you, a car in the lane next to you, a car in your normal blind spot, or (because of your peripheral vision) a car along side you. The only spot that is only truly blind is the car close behind you - at least on my bike.

    Many "safety experts" recommend checking your mirrors as often as every 5 seconds. (I'm still trying to build that into my bank of good riding habits.) But I think the 360 degree awareness we all want depends upon efficient use of mirrors. And in most situations, using properly adjusted "blind spot" mirrors mounted on your factory mirrors will give you more information faster than head checks.

    Doubt that I had the last word!
    Doug
    1992 K100RS

  14. #59
    haughty
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    Quote Originally Posted by racer7 View Post
    9) Fish are not likely to run into my bike. Everything else might.

    LOL I would agree with you on that point............
    BUT-(there is always a BUT isnt there?) The first time I was ever run off the road was because someone had DUMPED about 200 fish heads and tails on a gravel road..it made a pile about 2.5 feet high
    The driver in the cage saw the fish, and swerved towards us as he hadnt SEEN us..
    He saw the fish....... he did not see us.. I still cant believe that one..We were only going about 15 mph at the time.. NO room except for the ditch
    Ditch was about 5 foot deep..


    So even tho the fish had no wish to be there.. it was the fishes fault... so, yes everything else might but how many have had a school of viscerated fish direct a cager into your path?

  15. #60
    Registered User 88bmwjeff's Avatar
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    Be very careful of the tar used to fill cracks in the road (aka tar snakes). This stuff seems to have a low melting point and on a warm to hot day, the tar can be very slippery. Be careful at intersections and during other turns.


    BTW, I did find this out the hard way.
    Jeff in W.C.
    1988 R100 RT (the other woman)
    "I got my motorcycle jacket but I'm walking all the time." Joe Strummer

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