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Thread: When did I learn...? Practical tips for all riders.

  1. #31
    ALLANCOOK
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    Some of the best advice I ever got was from a very experienced buddy who told me that:

    "Sh*t happens when you're riding a motorcycle. And when sh*t happens, it tends to happen from the right."

    Ever since, I've stayed in the left lane or as far as possible to the left if I'm stuck in the right lane. And it's saved my butt more than a few times.

  2. #32
    Republic of Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIBUD View Post
    Don't ride next to a semi. Tires can and do explode, rims come off the hubs, the driver has a hard time seeing you and may move over on you.
    And the corollary, Don't follow too close BEHIND a semi (or any vehicle for that matter), especially if you cannot see what may be laying in the road ahead. You know why. Sometimes it's easy (or tempting) to forget.
    Mike White
    MOA Life Time Member #57882
    '13 K1300S "30 Years", '95 R1100RS, '88 K75S, '97 Ducati 916, '95 Ducati 900SS CR. Gone, but not forgotten, '75 R90S

  3. #33
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    If something in the bike doesn't feel right....

    .... It's probably not. Check and be sure all is ok before continuing.


    This falls under the trust your gut category. We all have a voice of self-preservation and a voice of expediancy. Long term motorcyclists have learned to listen to the former and give it preferance over the latter.

    If the little voice in your head tells you to think twice, think twice. And if it turns out you were just paranoid, what have you lost? Better to be alive and paranoid than the alternative.

    This is a big one: IF YOU KEEP DOING THE SAME THING, YOU'LL KEEP GETTING THE SAME RESULT. Always learn and be willing to change for the better. If something didn't work before, it probably won't work this time either.
    Steve Marquardt, 2004 R1150RT

  4. #34
    glennhendricks
    Guest

    Key position

    That position just past fork lock where you can take the key out?

    Double check the headlights.

    Jump starting an RT? You have to pull some plastic.

    If you've taken the saddlebags off an RT in order to jumpstart it, once you get it started and are looking at the bags on the ground and don't want to shut the bike down you'll remember that little half key that could fit in your wallet. And that the little half key is hanging on the key board at home 90 miles away.

  5. #35
    MARTYW
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    When you stop your bike on the side of a hill, put your uphill foot down first.
    When you stop your bike after a long ride, double check that you actually put your kickstand down.

    It's hard to climb out from under a fallen bike, and it's even harder to pretend that it doesn't hurt.

    -Marty

  6. #36
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    Smoking is dangerous

    If you're following a vehicle and you can see the occupants are smoking, stay back, especially if you see a window open. To many smokers think the world is their ashtray and will simply pitch a still lit butt out the window. Catching a hot ember in the face is no fun.
    Steve Marquardt, 2004 R1150RT

  7. #37
    2 Wheeled Troubador oldhway's Avatar
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    Some good stuff here for the new "Just Ridin'" forum.
    Steve Marquardt, 2004 R1150RT

  8. #38
    SGRIMSON
    Guest

    Just a few thoughts

    I always take real notice of children when on or around the bike. I once moved into new digs and the landlady was so nice until I parked the airhead and as I walked away her 3 year old touched the hot cylinder. Off to the doctor for him and me feeling just awful. 'Think ahead' doesn't just mean while riding.

    My feeling is, from my own experience, that I am most in danger when distracted or dozy. or COLD.
    I always have an electric vest in my side case to avoid hypothermia. It creeps up on you and slows down reaction times. Just as I always put on the rainsuit as soon as I see a car coming toward me with wipers going, I force myself to stop and get on the warm gear before I lose my better judgment.

  9. #39
    From MARS
    Guest
    "Space" is your friend; Create it! Use the manuverability of a motorcycle to position yourself as far from danger as possible.

    Position yourself so as to be able to see the driver in their rearview mirror.

    When passing large trucks, approach from a point which allows the driver to see you coming in his rearview mirror, turn on turn signals, flash your highbeam, and pass with authority. Move to the left as you go past the truck to avoid being sucked towards it and angle to the right as you approach the front to counteract the pressure wave off the front of the truck.

    On the open road, move to the right when meeting oncoming traffic; especially trucks. It makes you more visable to any vehicle following the truck and gives you space in case they pull out to pass. It also allows you to lean into their pressure wave and take the turbulence more head on.

    Move around in your lane; a moving target is harder to hit and attracts more attention from drivers.

    Use slower vehicles to block tailgaters by timing your pass. When coming upon a slower vehicle, look up the road for a passing opportunity. Slow your rate of approach until the opportunity presents its self; then pass with authority! Never allow yourself to be trapped.

    Even though a vehicle is stopped at a cross road, flash your highbeam several times. It lets them know you see them and makes you more visible. Give a friendly wave as you pass to acknowledge their courtesy.

    Tom

  10. #40
    RK Ryder
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    As you approach intersections that have stopped cars, alternating pushes of the handlebars make your headlights and presence more noticeable to those who might not otherwise notice you. I don't care if they think I'm out of control, so long as they see me and don't pull out until I've passed the intersection.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  11. #41
    Once there was a Tavern PAULBACH's Avatar
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    TCLOCK - Check list before you Ride

    FANTASTIC STUFF and HINTS. Great reading

    And now ...

    Tires and wheels
    Controls
    Lights
    Oils and fluids
    Chassis
    Kickstand

    For an outstanding checklist click here

  12. #42
    RK Ryder
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    How did I learn when parking on dirt, to always find a decent size rock embedded in the ground on which to place the bike's side stand foot? It certainly removes the surprise element of having the bike sinking and falling over to the left.
    Paul
    Retired and riding my RTs, the '87 K100 & the '98 R1100 !
    Treasurer of the Forest City Motorrad Club #159
    Knights of the Roundel #333

  13. #43
    Honey Badger Semper_Fi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul_F View Post
    How did I learn when parking on dirt, to always find a decent size rock embedded in the ground on which to place the bike's side stand foot? It certainly removes the surprise element of having the bike sinking and falling over to the left.
    For the longest time I carried the perfect rock I found in Nova Scotia as support for the kick stand on my Goldwing.

    We always carry a kick stand pad for my wife's bike and i have a kickstand extender on the GT.

    A simple suggestion that works very well.

    Luis
    2011 R1200 GSA Smoke Grey Metallic Matt
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    IBA #35651
    Rogue Moderator

  14. #44
    criminaldesign
    Guest
    pretty much be aware of everything and make sure people see you. things can sneak up on you.

  15. #45
    IBA #44567 Ken F's Avatar
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    Even if it's dark, don't roll your sleeping bag out on an ant hill.

    460
    IBA #44567 Pres. Springfield BMW Roadriders
    "Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the the universe."
    -Albert Eienstein

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