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Thread: What's in Your Toolkit?

  1. #31
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriated View Post
    Wow!

    When reading all of these posts, a question has come up--Is there such a thing as a list of all the fasteners on an 08 RT? For example, when compiling a toolkit, I don't want to carry a 19mm wrench if there's no 19mm nut on the bike. Conversely, I'd like to have a wrench/socket/extension/bit to get to everything I need to.

    Any way to know all the tools needed specifically for THIS bike? Short of taking everything apart?
    That's a tough one. I don't know of such a list.

    That pack of stuff I carry is a lot. But it is intended to be moved from bike to bike - and contain what I need whether on my R1150R, K75, or F650. Or Voni's bikes too. Or somebody else's should they breakdown and need a hand beside the road or in a campground. It is easier for me to just move the bag to the bike I'm taking on a trip than to try to outfit three separate kits for my bikes. And for Voni's too because she might be riding her R1100S while I have my K75 or F650. So one bag for all bikes makes the most sense for me. And I occasionally have to buy a tool on the road. A broken clutch cable occasioned the need for a deep 13mm socket to turn the locknut on the clutch adjuster on an R1100RS. I didn't have one, but the hardware store - open on Sunday in a small town in New York - was open and had one. Now it is in the tool bag.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
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  2. #32
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Expatriated View Post
    Any way to know all the tools needed specifically for THIS bike? Short of taking everything apart?
    Are you planning on taking your bike apart at the side of the road? If not then you don't need every possible wrench, socket, torx bit, etc. You only need the tools for stuff that you can reasonably fix at the side of the road. Anything else can be purchased once you get the bike off of the side of the road.

    My tool kit has stuff to do a basic service plus wrenches, sockets, bits, for all the things that might break or bend in a crash. Add in some tire plugs, tape, wire, jbstik, and cable ties. That will, hopefully, get me to a place where I can buy anything else I might need to get me home.... or rent a U-haul if it comes to that.

    I've yet to find a way to get around a failure of the thing that has failed most in my modern bike history: the battery. There is a lot to be said for magnetos.

    // marc

  3. #33
    Riding where it's hot! AZ-J's Avatar
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    I have one of these:



    and these:



    all fitting in the second shown bag.
    My bike shown here
    Jordan M, MOA #24434
    My Blog

  4. #34
    professor
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    I carry a tire plugging kit (Stop N Go) and a mini air compressor (Slime) fitted with the BMW plug. A few weeks ago I had a flat rear tire due to a large nail.

    I was so pleased with myself for being prepared with the above items. I pulled them out along with the factory provided "tool" kit and discovered that there were no pliers. I had no way to get the nail out of the tire.

    Fortunately, there was another rider near by and he loaned me his Leatherman multi-tool which includes needle-nose pliers. I have used other knock-off multi-tools and have been underwhelmed with their quality, but the Leatherman is solid. I removed the nail, plugged and filled the tire and was on my way.

    I highly recommend the Leatherman. It provides a lot of tools in a very compact package. There are several models to choose from.

  5. #35
    LONERANGER
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    How about one of these?

    http://www.advdesigns.net/ulcobmwr1gsg.html

    It is a little pricey but it looks like good quality and has just about everything to get you started. I am considering getting one.

  6. #36
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    Sorry, this is a bit wordy

    In my home shop I have not one, not two but three snap-on rollaway tool boxes with top units full of tools.

    On my 12RT I carry a tire plug kit with eight CO2 cartridges and my leatherman. If I can't ride this bike six thousand miles without working on it I will dump it and buy another Suzuki GT750 Water Buffalo.

    When the wife and I leave home two or three times a year for a three to six thousand mile vacation I have serviced and inspected the bike thoroughly before we leave.

    Any catastrophic failure we may suffer en route would necessitate parts anyway and that means a trip to a dealer. I have full coverage insurance including emergency road service that promises to transport me to the nearest selling dealer for my particular brand of vehicle from anywhere in the United States.

    I don't normally wrench on my vacations.

    However in 1988 coming into St. George Utah on our '85 Suzuki GK1100 the clutch started slipping in high gear rollons. We limped it into the dealer in that fine city and were informed that there was a three day wait for a service appointment and that a clutch job took six to eight hours to perform. I laughed at the service writer and asked him to please confirm that this was a Suzuki Motorcycle shop. He did and I walked to the parts counter and bought a set of friction plates. The manager came out and asked what I had in mind and I told him I was going to replace the clutch plates in the dirt lot next door and continue on my trip. He stated it was illegal to drain oil out there and I told him I would not have to drain any oil.

    He walked out and stood there watching as the wife and I laid our raingear on the ground and laid the bike down on top of it and I then popped off the clutch cover, pulled out the clutch plates and replaced the friction plates, put it all back together and stood the bike up. Elapsed time a shade over thirty minutes. The manager bought us dinner that evening and tried to hire me.

  7. #37
    Cam Killer marchyman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MPMARTY View Post
    On my 12RT I carry a tire plug kit with eight CO2 cartridges and my leatherman. If I can't ride this bike six thousand miles without working on it I will dump it and buy another Suzuki GT750 Water Buffalo.
    I'd add cable ties, wire, electrical tape, duct tape, and JB stick: any or all of which might be needed to repair those things that get broken if the bike falls over.

    That's the kind of stuff that got a friend home after an SUV pushed his bike off of the center stand in a motel parking lot.

    // marc

  8. #38
    Registered User mpmarty's Avatar
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    I agree Marchyman and I'll probably break down and add those items to my shaving kit. We only stay in motels that either allow us to take the bike inside the room with us or at least park it in a secure location such as under a stairwell or in the front of the lobby. We're going to Yellowstone this summer and have arranged to rent a Bronco 4X4 from Enterprise and they (Enterprise) will store the bike inside for us while we use the Bronco. I tried Yellowstone once years ago and had a narrow escape from an angry Buffalo bull. Won't try that two up. Better safe....

  9. #39
    R1200GS Adventure Madhatter's Avatar
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    I'm in the midst of buying an R1200GS Adv. I was looking at this thread for some ideas for a toolkit for the GSA--the factory kit seems pathetic. I'm new to riding and have never had a 'breakdown', but more than once in my life I was glad to be prepared for the unexpected, e.g. a nail in the tire. It isn't a question of the realiability of the machine as much as it is a question of chance accident or unhappy circumstance.

    My Plan A is a cell phone and credit card. But, and it's a significant 'but', many of the places I have ridden my RT there was no cell phone service. Nada. I can be out of cell phone coverage in about 20 minutes or less riding time from my garage. I kept the RT on pavement, mostly. I expect to take the GSA to even more remote places.

    So I have Plan B: some tools, some spares, some duct tape, some water, and a willingness to fool around with them until help finds me or I can limp to civilization.

    Thanks to all the posters who helped put this thread together!

    Jack

  10. #40
    afisher
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    Cruz Tools RoadTech B1

    Got this right away as it's specifically made for the GS. I also pack a Cycle Pump.

    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #41
    Registered User robertklee's Avatar
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    Cresent wrench

    One small cresent wrench will take up lots less space than all those open end wrenches.

    RKL
    "Leave the gun. Take the cannoli."

  12. #42
    Benchwrenching PGlaves's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robertklee View Post
    One small cresent wrench will take up lots less space than all those open end wrenches.

    But be a looser fit on small fasteners usually. I use a box end wrench at every opportunity instead of an open end too.
    Paul Glaves - "Big Bend", Texas U.S.A
    "The greatest challenge to any thinker is stating the problem in a way that will allow a solution." - Bertrand Russell
    http://www.bigbend.net/users/glaves

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by swall View Post
    Besides a spare EWS antenna ring, that is. I am just putting mine together. So far, I have a Torx folding key set. I am getting ready to order a 3/8 drive Torx T40, T45 and T30. Then I'll put in a compact 3/8 ratchet and about a 10" extension and a 14mm socket to fit the muffler clamp (or is that a 13mm?). Then, the stock tool kit goes to Rochester Iron & Metals on my next scrap run.
    For my 2007 RT I need a deep socket 16mm for the muffler clamp and a 50mm Torx for the rear wheel. Sears has them.

  14. #44
    Registered User MOLLYGRUBBER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 107117 View Post
    Got this right away as it's specifically made for the GS. I also pack a Cycle Pump.

    +1 on the CruzTools kit, pretty damn complete for minor roadside repairs (but it needs a tiny torx for adjusting the control pods if they get knocked out of kilter in a tip-over), and the quality is quite good. The adjustable wrench actually works! And they even put a flashlight in the kit...

    Peter
    "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

  15. #45
    Survivor akbeemer's Avatar
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    Doc Allen's VersaTool

    I've found this tool very handy. I keep it in the tank bag and often it is all that is needed to handle minor issues.
    $14 at http://www.advdesigns.net/inga.html
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    Kevin Huddy
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