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Thread: Tire Break In

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  1. #1
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Question Tire Break In

    No, I am not kidding.

    I was reading a brochure from Dunlop, and they actually said to be gentle for about 100 miles.

    So I read more and it has to do with you getting comfortable as well as the "preservatives" from transport and storage coming off.

    So I was curious if all manufacturers recommend it? Also how many people do it?

    Thanks

    New tires, I am ready for Branson
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  2. #2
    USERNAME
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    i did it. dunlop 220s on an 1150ra.

    but im not one to go dump my bike and then think, 'well i guess i better back off.' im more cautious and i think, 'good, i didnt dump my bike.

    i asked this question a while back and got good responses. one dude posted about how he rode home and had a get-off due to the mold compound. it waqs in a turn he'd taking a zillion times, and this time, whoosh, he went down. youll read various things about people scrubbing their tires with sand paper and stuff. here's what i did...

    i rode home almost totally upright, very cautiously. then i washed the tires a couple times with soap and water. this did almost nothing. then i rode them carefully, but not overly-cautiously for 100 miles. (some people swear by a thermal cycling to break them in, 20 hard minutes/miles, 20 easy minutes/miles, repeat a few times. im skeptical about this, but whatever makes you happy.) my biggest worry was the mold release compound making them slippery. so i rode upright for a bit, 10 miles or so, then i did some careful turns, and basically over the course of a day of city/suburb riding i took my time increasing my lean angle on turns. the point was to avoid being wayyyy leaned over riding only on a small contact patch and 100% mold compound coated rubber in a situation requiring maximum friction force. so i'd go over a little further each time, thinking, 'im half on scrubbed rubber, half on mold compound slickened rubber.' then at red lights i'd think, 'is slickened a word?'

    100 miles is often quoted, and i think it's just to be sure you get time on the bike, you get it leaned over a few times, and the tires get properly scuffed before you ride aggressively. i'll bet i was safe after 93 miles.

  3. #3
    Registered User rapz's Avatar
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    tire breakin

    I take it easy for 200 miles, not on speed, but on my lean angles.
    Website: www.airheadmoto.com
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    Current Bike 1979 BMW 100RT; 2013 BMW R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition; 2008 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 105th Anniversary Edition

  4. #4
    Subzero Scooter Idiot oldcarkook's Avatar
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    I'm not so sure it's as much mileage as it is scuffing up the entire tire profile.

    There is definitely some greasy oil stuff that the tire has when new that will let you dump it almost instantly out of the shop if you crank it over.

    You need to slowly lean it at increasing angles until you get them scuffed up. I actually have a twisty road with a really rough surface about a mile from my house (Tower Hill Road in Cumberland RI) that is PERFECT for breaking in tires. Hard hairpins uphill so you can crank it over at relative low speeds until you get them scuffed up.

    I have a buddy who sits in his garage with the bike on the center stand and he hand scuffs the outer edges with some 80 grit sandpaper. I don't know if this gets those oils or "presevatives" out, but you definitely want to ease in a new set of tires.

    I saw a guy dump coming out of the shop last summer when I was picking up parts one Saturday. He had new tires put on and literally dumped it in front of Dunbar's in Brockton turning onto Route 28 and hopping on it to jump in traffic. Went out from under him like he was on a oily truck exit ramp in the first minutes of rain. Whooosh! Rider down.
    Experience is the comb that mother nature gives us when we are bald

  5. #5
    Don't forget your towel
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    From Bridgestone:

    Break-in Period

    In order for your new tire(s) to provide optimum performance, tires should be ridden very cautiously for the first 100 miles in order for the tread surface to be ÔÇ£Scuffed-InÔÇØ and work properly. Directly after new tires are mounted, sudden acceleration, maximum braking and hard cornering must be avoided. This will allow the rider to adjust to the ÔÇ£FeelÔÇØ and handling characteristics of the new tire and for the new tire to be ÔÇ£Scuffed-InÔÇØ correctly in order to achieve optimum grip level.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Makes me wonder what the racers do...I'd like to apply for the job of "Tire Scrubbing-in Guy"

    I just put a new BT020 (front) on the other day. Living in a fairly rural area I used the first few miles of it's break-in to weave back and forth across the road to wear off some of the goop. After that I headed out on a nice twisty loop that happens to run about 90 miles door to door on a nice smooth road with a coarse texture. I know the road fairly well and what it feels like on scrubbed tires so I use a "seat of the pants" approach to increasing lean angles.
    The caveat here is that I have approaching 150,000 total miles on motorcycles, (40K on this bike) and I ride somewhere at least three days a week rain or shine, so I have a pretty good sense of "feel" for when something is wrong with the bike. Looking in the classifieds for used bikes I see a lot of them with a couple thousand miles per year, that first 100 miles is a fairly significant portion of some riders annual totals.

    Steve

  6. #6
    Don't forget your towel
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    Metzler says:

    After fitting, the tyre should not be used with maximum power or hard cornering and not over 60 mph for the first 100-150 miles. This is needed to allow the tyre/rim assembly to adjust properly and most of all to let the compound find his optimum working conditions .
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Got that "not over 60mph" part?

    Yeah, right....

    Steve

  7. #7
    GIZMO
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    I read an article some time ago that pointed out that an investigation of motorcycles involved in accidents, a high number were brand new motorcycles with obviously new tires or new tires or older motorcycles. Obviously, there are other causes of accidents but there is no question that new tires need to be scrubbed in 150 to 200 miles is about right to accomplish this.

  8. #8
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Brad,

    Yes. You should take it easy on a new tire for the first hundred miles or so.

  9. #9
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Originally posted by knary
    Brad,

    Yes. You should take it easy on a new tire for the first hundred miles or so.
    Don't forget to check your tire pressure pretty frequently as well. Sometimes, it take a bit for the tire to really get seated and hold air well.

    For me, it's mostly about lean angles. I ride the bike slowly, gradually increasing lean angle until the tires are pretty well scuffed. After about a hundred miles, the tire has been through a couple heat/cool cycles, the tread is scuffed pretty thoroughly and the tires are ready for real riding.

    For you guys that are going to track day, make sure your tires have some miles on them before you really try to push them out there.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  10. #10
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Originally posted by KBasa
    Don't forget to check your tire pressure pretty frequently as well. Sometimes, it take a bit for the tire to really get seated and hold air well.
    Excellent point!

    I thought it wasn't so much that they leak when first installed, but that the tire stretches a bit when brand new when its being broken in. This stretching means that the same quantity of air is occupying a larger space, so there is less pressure.

    Next we'll have to talk to Brad about riding at different elevations and the effect that has on tire pressure.

  11. #11
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Today I got a whole new feeling when I jumped on the brakes cause someone cut me off at a light this morning.

    Light just changed to green for me
    Look right and left
    Proceed with caution
    Out of my right side I see a minivan
    Seems to be coming awfully fast
    Squeeze brakes hard
    Tires slid a little more than I like
    Stopped about three feet from where she came through the red light

    The thing I was most worried about, "Please let me remember to put my feet down [bold]after[/bold] I stop"

    Only changed the front one, but since 70% of braking force comes from that, it is pretty important.

    Oh yeah, there was a soccerr ball sticker on the back window.

    Took the long way home to scuff them up a little bit more. So I have about 60 miles.

    All is good though.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  12. #12
    Gary99
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    You can either take it easy for a while, or scuff the tires intentionally, like racers do, if you are going to need the traction immediatelely.

  13. #13
    looking for a coal mine knary's Avatar
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    Originally posted by LTOwner
    You can either take it easy for a while, or scuff the tires intentionally, like racers do, if you are going to need the traction immediatelely.
    Gravel roads work well.

  14. #14
    Registered User rapz's Avatar
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    Tire Breakin

    Good to know about gravel. In south Texas we've got hundreds of miles of gravel roads and lots more dirt roads, plus we've got county roads that are made of that rough rock pavement.
    Website: www.airheadmoto.com
    IBA No. 58411
    Current Bike 1979 BMW 100RT; 2013 BMW R1200RT 90th Anniversary Edition; 2008 Harley Davidson Ultra Classic 105th Anniversary Edition

  15. #15
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
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    Wesley's bleach white will get the mold release off the tires. Then it is just a matter of scuffing them up. I have 1000 miles on my track day tires, and I will most likely have 2500 or so by the time May 8 comes around. Wesley's will not leave a residue behind, just clean rubber.
    Gale Smith
    2009 Versys
    1999 R1100RT

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