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  1. #16
    Registered User Concowrider's Avatar
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    Scanning Question

    Doug, I noticed you post images that were scanned in from slides, etc. Your Low light / night shot in Az. with the lightning bolts was most excellent!
    Since most of our pre 2000 photo efforts involved slides or prints we will soon be looking into scanning them in to digital format (somehow). This includes slides in Kodachrome 10, 25, et.al. Really would like to get those old Kodachrome 10 images saved before they get too orange. Any words of wisdom? We do have a flatbed scanner but have used it precious little. Any list of "do's & don'ts" or tricks with reguard to scanning in images?
    This photo forum is a great ice breaker. Allowing folks with similar interests to easily share their life events with others, is special. Good job to all concerned!
    Cheers
    Dave, Dot & Freckles Doggie

  2. #17
    Airhead GS convert...
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    << Doug, I noticed you post images that were scanned in from slides, etc. Your Low light / night shot in Az. with the lightning bolts was most excellent! >>

    Thanks!

    << Since most of our pre 2000 photo efforts involved slides or prints we will soon be looking into scanning them in to digital format (somehow). This includes slides in Kodachrome 10, 25, et.al. Really would like to get those old Kodachrome 10 images saved before they get too orange. Any words of wisdom? We do have a flatbed scanner but have used it precious little. Any list of "do's & don'ts" or tricks with reguard to scanning in images? >>

    You'll need a scanner with a backlight if you're going to scan in negs or slides. And scanning in negs / slides is best way - you'll see a positive diff. between scanning in from a neg. vs. scanning in from a print. The backlight can be various widths; make sure the one you buy is wide enough for your negs (mine is 2", which is more than enough for 35mm, but a tiny bit skimpy for medium-format).

    Some scanners have trouble with panoramic images, due to having a bar in the fixture that holds the neg, at the standard length. Probably not a problem for you, but worth mentioning.

    I'd advise that you read reviews of any scanner you're interested in before buying. If I had it to do over again, I'd get a scanner where the whole lid was a backlight, that could scan up to 8x10 negs. Probably in a year or so, I'll move to a bigger scanner that can do up to 8x10 negs, just in case I get a bigger camera. But when I bought my scanner I had only 35mm negs, bigger formats are a new thing to me. Buy what *you* need.

    After that, I'd say do it. Get experience. It's not difficult.

    You'll probably find that the default color / contrast curves in the scanner aren't necc. to your liking. That's easy enough to change, so don't worry if the first attempt isn't quite perfect. I've found that my slides are stable on color, but a few prized ones have gotten dots of mold in 25 years. But you mentioned discoloration - don't sweat it. Once scanned, it's a digital image, and can be color-corrected at the time of scanning or later in Photoshop.

    It is time-consuming. You'll probably start out thinking that every old image is worth scanning, then slowly come around to the fact that they're not all as good as you remember.

    When I started scanning, I scanned a bunch of stuff (from negs) that hadn't printed very well at the one-hour labs, and was shocked / pleased / amazed that there was a better image in there than I'd seen when it was printed back in the early 1980s.

    There are articles and tutorials on every photo-related thing you could do, out on the Net. I can't point you to any scanning sites, but in general I've had good finds on technique at photo.net.

    Have fun!

    FWIW, I still shoot mostly film. Esp. family, vacation, and panoramic stuff. Spending the money on film forces me to edit before I even push the button, and then spending time scanning I edit again (is this pic worth the trouble to scan?). But I like the longevity of negs, the manual control of film, and no shutter lag. Plus I figure that the electronics are the fragile part of a digital camera, so I figure I'm leaving the fragile part of modern photography (the electronics) home when I take a trip equipped mostly with clunky old cameras. Few see it the way I do, but that's OK.

    << This photo forum is a great ice breaker. Allowing folks with similar interests to easily share their life events with others, is special. Good job to all concerned! >>

    Agreed.
    Best,
    Doug Grosjean
    Pemberville, Ohio
    douggrosjean@gmail.com

    Author of "Wheels"
    http://www.authorhouse.com/BookStore...kid~32002.aspx

  3. #18
    BMWNUT grw's Avatar
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    Scanning slides, negatives, and prints

    Quote Originally Posted by ConcowRider View Post
    Doug, I noticed you post images that were scanned in from slides, etc. Your Low light / night shot in Az. with the lightning bolts was most excellent!
    Since most of our pre 2000 photo efforts involved slides or prints we will soon be looking into scanning them in to digital format (somehow). This includes slides in Kodachrome 10, 25, et.al. Really would like to get those old Kodachrome 10 images saved before they get too orange. Any words of wisdom? We do have a flatbed scanner but have used it precious little. Any list of "do's & don'ts" or tricks with reguard to scanning in images?
    This photo forum is a great ice breaker. Allowing folks with similar interests to easily share their life events with others, is special. Good job to all concerned!
    Cheers
    Dave, Dot & Freckles Doggie
    I've been working through a 40 year backlog of slides and negatives (with polaroid and conventional prints thrown in) using a pair of ACER Film Scanners (a Scanwit 2720 and a 2740) and a Epson flatbed USB scanner.

    But the key to my good results has been the use of Vuescan software from Hamrick Software (www.hamrick.com). This has been the best investment I've made. The software that comes with most scanners is junk compared to Steve Hamrick's package.

    One of the things I really like is that Hamrick supplies drivers for all the scanners eliminating the funky drivers from different vendors. His package knows how to use the Digital ICE feature (IR Channel) of the 2740 to remove dirt and scratches from old slides and negatives. It also knows how to color adjust for different types of film (just about any film ever sold) and how to restore color, fading, and reduce grain. Unlike other package I've used his software lets you take multiple passes of an image in order to improve the rendering of the final image. This noticeably enhances the quality of the scans (albeit while taking more time).

    Good luck with the project.

    -Gary
    ----------------------
    Gary Wasserman
    MOA#38120 DoD#0216 Airheads#12166 BMWRO
    '85 K100 / '83 R80RT

  4. #19
    Registered User Concowrider's Avatar
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    Scanning Info

    Doug, Gary, thanks so much. I printed out your responses and will look into how we can best incorporate the good info you both have shared into our efforts to liberate some of our old images.
    Thanks again!
    Dave, Dot & Freckles Doggie

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