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Thread: Photo Assignment 01/26/08

  1. #31
    Grant Grant63rt's Avatar
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    Boathouses

    "Boathouses over ice"
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #32
    rocketman
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    My Town: Washington DC

    Ok I think I’m set, any more internal debates and I’ll go crazy, so out of four finalists I decided on these three. All taken with my P&S.

    The view from Jefferson’s lap



    A hidden Concrete Garden in the Midst of Madness



    Smithsonian Castle Building: Entrance at Midnight



    :wipe-brow

    RM

  3. #33
    Registered User
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    The Queen City


  4. #34
    Registered User
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    Porkopolis, USA


  5. #35
    Registered User
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    3-Way; Cheese Coney, Mustard and No Onion


  6. #36
    rocketman
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    Welcome JohnF, thanks for joining in and remember have fun and post often in incoming assignments.

    Love the pigs!

    RM

  7. #37
    Registered User soldemall's Avatar
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    Dallas





    Paul

  8. #38
    SNC1923
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    Feedback I

    Well, better late than never I always say. This "week's" photo assignment has gone on for a few weeks. I think the results show that some folks really invested a great deal of time and thought into their work.

    First up is BMWDean

    Photo #1 - Mule deer in the Sonoran desert:



    Photo #2 - Sunset behind Wasson Peak, Tucson vicinity:



    Photos #3a & 3b - Two views of my town, Tucson, AZ. First is a fisheye (replete with photographer's shadow):



    The second is a more conventional view of downtown:




    This is an especially nice series, one that conveys much of the feel and geography of where Jeff winters. I like the shot of the deer--they're hard to get. The cactus and the tree provide a natural frame, too. The little fella almost appears to be posing and he's not dead-center in the frame, either. I've seen a lot of sunsets. This one is particularly rich, though, and the cacti add visual interest to be sure. Is there a more iconic plant? I really like to two city-scapes, A and B. The fisheye shot is great--an unusual application of this lens and one the lends a unique perspective to a familiar scene. As Jeff already pointed out, it has a distracting shadow. Waiting several hours for the sun to move would probably have been the only solution. The second city-scape, more standard, is a nice shot, too. I would have liked to have seen it shot perhaps a bit lower with the mountains higher in the frame. Hindsight makes these observations easy. Beautiful model in these shots, by the way.

    Statdawg returns with three shots of a very different winter indeed.







    These three images evoke the sort of dreary winter that many of us labor under, myself included. One of the photographic details that I think contributes to this feeling is the lack of a discernible subject, especially in the first two shots. No.1, not uninteresting, is predominated by brown grass and has the dreaded horizon bisection. The rule of thirds might have helped here. The title helps to point to the contrast of the barn and the school. What if one had been foregrounded to the other? No. 2 is quite a bit more interesting, and it could be argued that the store is the subject. You're to be commended for composing the shot so that the viewer is not looking straight down the street, but that it is off to the left--especially given your title. The yellow of the store adds a splash of color, albeit muted, in this photo. It's an interesting and visually appealing shot of your town. No. 3 eludes me. I'm sure the flag is the focus of the faith 'till death, but I'm not tracking. The fence bothers me, though the framing through the trees is good. I'm thinking this might be a church, though I can't see for sure. I would have liked this to have been taken over the fence. Nice series. I have a real sense of where you call home from these shots.

    Redclfo is back with an interesting series of where he calls home.







    This is really quite an interesting series. No. 1 is a great shot. I love the composition, even off-kilter as it is, as that mirrors the construction of this building. I also really like the patch-work of the facade, and of course the Sarge and/or the door are not dead-center. He emerges from the darkness within, adding even more visual interest. No. 2 is equally appealing. I love the composition and the upward perspective of the barn. I normally dislike things shot through trees, but this works. Perhaps due to the simplicity/size/color of the subject, and that the snow on the branches adds contrast and interest. This is a neat shot. No. 3 doesn't work for me, for the same reasons that No. 1 does. Subject too small, too far. There appears to be quite a bit of motion blur, too. This was shot at too slow a shutter speed to be hand-held. Increasing the ISO can help.

    One point of interest here: As has been mentioned by others in previous posts, compare the shots in posts 9 and 10, the latter having been uploaded to my SmugMug account. The ones posted on my site appear slightly richer, more saturated. I find this surprising and interesting. . . .

    Grossjohann is back this week with a particularly appealing series of his town.







    All three, very nice. No. 1 is a great perspective of Main Street. The festive red ribbons are the subject: one if foregrounded to grab the viewer by the collar and say, "I'm the subject!" The scene recedes nicely into the distance and it's a bit unusual in that it's vertically composed. No. 2 made me think immediately of Foundation holiday cards. It's a very nice scene as well, and like No. 1, clearly evokes a holiday spirit. Having underexposed this just a bit more might have helped retain the detail in the tree lights and lighted clock face, even isolating them in the composition. Definitely a bit darker. No. 3 is a complex exposure as well. I think I might have shot this a bit darker, too, but here it is arguable. To have done so would have lost the interesting sky. The restaurant sign is a bit hot, but not bad. The beer signs are over-exposed. The range of light in this shot exists over a wide latitude, so some sacrifices would have to be made. You may just have struck a happy medium. It's a moody, evocative shot, one that a weary, cold traveler would be happy to come across.

    Monkeywork is here this week with three particularly nice shots of his town.







    No. 1 is a nice composition, not only in terms of structure but also of color. The theater marquee jumps out of the corner of this text-book example of the golden-mean composition. No. 2 reminds me a bit of Grossjohann's street-scape. Also vertically oriented, it has a pleasing receding perspective, but it does lack a discernible subject. Still evokes a cold winter afternoon, though. No. 3 is very interesting. Shooting in B&W was a good choice here, I think. This viewer wants you to take five steps to your left and view the church between the trees and not behind them. May not have been your intent however. These are very interesting trees with complex systems of branches that are really visually interesting with the snow to lend contrast. This might be worth reshooting to experiment with various perspectives.

  9. #39
    Mad Scientist monkeywork's Avatar
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    the great thing is, that last pic of the church... is color.

    the scene itself lacked it.
    http://www.monksvoice.com

    I could be the voice you're hearing.

  10. #40
    SNC1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by monkeywork View Post
    the great thing is, that last pic of the church... is color.

    the scene itself lacked it.
    Wow. You got me. I made a similar error on one of Gail's shots a while back. Interesting. . . .

  11. #41
    kartcon
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    A Cold Day in Daytona Beach Florida

    Deserted Downtown


    Fire Station #1


    Bad Vacation Planning


    Art
    aka Kartcon

  12. #42
    grossjohann
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    Thanks for the feedback, Tom.

    I should have taken more time and bracketed, perhaps. Again, I had assumed the assignment was for one weekend, only I ran out Sunday evening and shot all three in haste.

    Not only does the 2 week assignment give you some time to catch your creative breath between shoots, it gives us some more time to experiment. One thread for discussion, and the other for application

    Great concept.

    Thank you,
    Alex

  13. #43
    Registered User MLS2GO's Avatar
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    The hardest one yet for me

    I live in a small Village, but it is part of the Kansas City Metro, so I chose that instead. My problem was cutting a city of 2 million to 3 pictures. I actually took these two weeks ago when it first came out, but couldn't decide which ones. But here we go.

    The first is Athur Bryant's Barbeque. Called by New Yorker food critic Calvin Trillin the "Greatest Restaurant in the World."


    This is the entrance of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in the Historic 18th and Vine District. It is housed in the same building as the American Jazz Museum. This is actually half of the facade. The Negro Leagues were formed in KC down the street in the YMCA.


    The last of these are a distinctive part of Downtown. Called by some Docking Stations for Aliens, the world's largest hair curlers and some things much less nice they are the towers of the Convention Center.
    Bob Rippy
    IBA #451
    Tour of Honor Missouri State Sponsor
    14 R1200RT (currently parked) 07 R1200RT

  14. #44
    SNC1923
    Guest

    Feedback II

    Voni's back with her essay on Nine Point, Texas.







    No. 1 is clearly the "winner" in this series. It's a masterful composition: an interesting subject well-composed, a less-interesting and non-interfering background counterpoint, and a horizon that doesn't bisect the image. Very, very nice. No. 2 is a good picture though a less successful composition. The photographer is battling fading light and dealing with huge shadows beneath brightly-lit buildings. Perhaps a composition like the first, foregrounding the covered wagon looking out to the social club? No. 3 struggles with the same difficult lighting. I have to ask myself: What is the subject? Horse trailer, dog, American flag, or horses? It's a neat series taken in total and gives one a clear image of a little town with fewer people than even it's name.

    Burnzilla chimes in this week with a very nice series, indeed.







    No. 1 shows that of the thousands of possible ways in which someone can shoot horses in a corral, there are still unexpected variations. This is a great, if humorous, composition that demands the viewer's attention. No. 2: How are you going to go wrong with giant Redwoods and filtered light? It's a snapshot, but a successful one. No. 3 is a really nice still-life. We all take pictures of signs and plaques, more so as we get older, in order to remember where we've been. But this is beautifully lit with interesting objects to arrange a lovely scene. It's a spot-on composition and really a kind of found art. Very nice, artistically rendered series.

    Boney's back with more fine images this week.







    Each of these is a well-thought-out composition. Great exposures, too. The mission is really nice with the (bell?) in the foreground not interfering with the mission itself. The grape vines are off kilter a bit--Boney may have even mentioned that already. Still a powerful image. The red barn is also a really nicely balanced image. These shots are so successful, I think, because the frame is filled with the intended image; the viewer is not searching for the subject. These are quite nice.

    Franze came in with some images from far, far away, in Nyon.







    All three of these are nice images. The train station shot leaves me wanting a bit. It's a scene of a place, but it seems to lack a center or central idea. The third shot works well with a difficult exposure latitude. Franze executes this very well. This reminds me a bit too much of my garage, though. The second shot is a master stroke. Beautiful exposure and composition. Although the horizon bisects the picture, the leading line, the interesting water, and the dramatic sky tie this whole thing up in a nice bow. Great image and a nice series.

    Pglaves is here this week with an interesting series of one of these compelling Texas towns.







    Both Paul and Voni came up with really interesting quirky series without resorting to photoing each other's chosen towns. Bonus points for that. 500 bonus points each for having Voni in your photos and for making them motorcycle-related. You may be our big winner this week. Each of these is a nice shot, and a series that tells a story about a place that I now feel as though I've visited. In each instance, however, I want you to walk 50 paces closer and take a picture of an element of these scenes to show us. consider if No. 1 were a vertical composition including only the bikes, Voni, the sign, and the store. Such interesting locations can bear such scrutiny. I'd love to go riding with you guys sometime, particularly if we could stop at the Kowgirl Kafe.

  15. #45
    SNC1923
    Guest

    Feedback III

    Well, I'm going to talk about myself for a minute, so you may want to just skip ahead.







    In contrast to many of my past posts, I'm very pleased with this week's effort. The first shot is the crowning achievement. This is a 13 second exposure captured on a tripod. My buddy Brad and I rode around town one night capturing local landmarks. He kept criminal-types at bay and spotted traffic to make sure I wasn't run over. No. 1 is one of about 50 shots. I bracketed a great deal to find the right exposure. I love the big LCD screen for checking accuracy. I like this one best as a city bus drove through the exposure leaving these great red trails. No. 2 is a pretty standard shot of a local landmark. Again, I took many shots and many different compositions. Bricciphoto helped me pick the right one. No. 3 couldn't be more pedestrian. I just felt a daylight image wouldn't fit this series of three.

    Lamble struggled to find his muse, but I think ultimately he was successful.







    Per his request (much appreciated) I'll comment on these three. No. 1 is fabulous. It's a great capture of a beautiful bird in flight. This isn't easy and he got a good one. The composition of troubling, with the birds cut off at the bottom and the mountains bisecting the image, but one just can't attend to these things when tracking such a fast moving image. In spite of these minor flaws, this is a great shot. No. 2 I like quite a lot. He posted another that he liked better in the commentary thread, but I prefer this one. It's close up, composed well, and interesting image with the signs tiled beneath one another. It really tells a story of rampant development. No. 3 is simply remarkable for its intense natural beauty. The sheer volume of birds is remarkable and that they fill the frame adds to the intensity and drama. Even more interesting is how they seem to conform to the natural lines of the mountainous background. That Lamble was not shat upon during these photos is amazing (and I'm making a big assumption here).

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