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Thread: Unchained Tea and a Wee Tour '08

  1. #16
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    Let's all share a bombilla

    Mat?® is actually not tea but a tea-like beverage originating from Argentina and Uruguay, and primarily consumed in those countries as well as in Paraguay and southern Brazil; brewed from the dried leaves and stemlets of the perennial Yerba Mat?® tree. Its name derives from the quichua word "mat?¡" designating the gourd in which it is traditionally served. On average, 300,000 tons of mat?® are produced each year.

    In its consistency similar to green tea, mat?® has a distinctive, full, bittersweet flavor with a note of alfalfa, resembling that of tea but milder. Of the 196 volatile chemical compounds contained in Yerba Mat?®, 144 are also contained in tea. Knowing its manifold health benefits ÔÇô among the plant's ingredients are the alkaloids xanthine, theophylline and theobromine as well as vitamins C, E, several B vitamins and numerous minerals ÔÇô the South American Guarani Indians have traditionally used the plant for medicinal purposes, inter alia as a stimulant to the central nervous system, to promote mental, physical and cardiovascular activity, enhance resistance to fatigue, reduce fever, mitigate thirst and hunger, decrease blood pressure, and as a diuretic, laxative, purgative, sudorific, and antirheumatic.

    Legend has it that knowledge of the infusion's powers was first imparted to a young Guarani woman and her father by a mysterious shaman, rewarding the woman's faithfulness in staying with her exhausted father while her tribe continued their search for arable land. In recent years, mat?® has become a cultural phenomenon throughout large parts of South America, and it is now gaining increased popularity in Northern America and Europe as well. In South America, sharing mat?® from the same container and the same straw (bombilla) is a symbol of closeness and friendship, both in a family and in other social contexts.

  2. #17
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    So if you'll be passing through the east coast, will you eventually wander through TexSux on the way south? If so, look me up. Really.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  3. #18
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The_Veg View Post
    So if you'll be passing through the east coast, will you eventually wander through TexSux on the way south? If so, look me up. Really.
    It would be a delight to visit Tex Sux, but the shake down is the northern states and Canada mid 08, then I'm looking at west coast down to TDF, so it's not on the way...although things change and the Texas Hill Country has a ride to it from the Xplor BMW site that I'd like to make, and visit some friends from my Unchained ride in 06 that took in the southern states.

    Who knows where I'll end up riding, the World, as they say, is my oyster, making the USA my whelk I suppose.
    Whelk om to the USA.

    At some point next year I have to return to the UK to get the extension to the visa sorted out..it's 7 years but after 2 you need to go out, to come back in...probably entails a fee, because anything other than making money out of it, seems bloody illogical, then we have to apply for our green cards, so I need to learn that pledge thing you folks have. I may even have to enrol in an alien induction class or whatever it's called, so I should be able to pick up some extra Spanish while there.

    Then there's Unchainedworld.com to get up and running, so I'll need some rides out and about to help populate that.

    So that's almost a definite possibly then...do you have a kettle?

  4. #19
    Amma Holly's Avatar
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    Test ride and tea

    Check out this funny Triumph ad, Lamble. Naturally, the test ride ends with tea.

    http://gadgets.boingboing.net/2007/1...a-triumph.html

    Holly

  5. #20
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    do you have a kettle?
    Not at present, but it should be easy enough to get one.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  6. #21
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    Holly, thanks for the Britishness.

    In a bid to start accustoming myself to the South American ways, I bought some matte latte yesterday-I know it's only a token gesture but you can't find llama steaks in the local butchers and the deli was right out of guinea pig burgers, and I must say the version of matte I had tasted like a handful of garden. Not the fresh baby leaves of the shrubbery, more the shovelful of compost by the shed.

    Now I'm sure it's good for me (it does afterall have to provide some benefit to drinking it) but I sincerely hope that by Dec 08, either my tastebuds will have adapted, or I'll have found there are far more enjoyable versions.

    yuk, yak, eckk, gaggg, phhhttt

  7. #22
    Has the GS-Lust The_Veg's Avatar
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    yuk, yak, eckk, gaggg, phhhttt
    Sound-defects.
    2012 R1200GS

    "If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

  8. #23
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    3 cups

    Name change:

    I've been studying my teas and there's a saying that it takes 3 cups to become a friend.
    The first is just polite, the second a chance to find out about each other and the third to find friendship.

    With this is mind, Tea and a wee will from now on be called The Third Cup Tour.

    If I'm taking a miniature bone china tea service (I've found one), I hope the size of the cups won't be a hinderance, otherwise I might need to call it the somewhere between three and nine cups trip, and that's just a little wordy!

    Perhaps the emphasis of the trip could change. Instead of the ride and tea, it should be more a stop me and have a cup or three meeting with as many people as possible.

    With my Spanish classes starting in the Spring, perhaps I could work a sticker for the bike in espanol, unless anyone knows spanish for "stop me for tea a chat and a photograph".

  9. #24
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    extreme tea

    I thought riding around South America drinking tea would be fairly extreme, but it's not. This puts it into perspective:

    Start with a cable car trip.



    Build up your thirst with a short hike along the path:



    Remember to use the hand rail if you feel tired:



    Watch out for people coming the other way:



    Nearly there, put the kettle on:



    Then here's the pay off. What the biscuits are still at the bottom...bloody hell!


  10. #25
    Registered User rmarkr's Avatar
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    Tea

    Hi Lamble
    How's this for an irony. I'm addicted to coffee. On my recent ride through Central America, if you ordered a cup of coffee, you got frikken Nescafe instant coffee - it drove me mad! So drinking tea does not sound that unique. It may be more challenging drinking coffee - in the center of the coffee growing world.
    To offer any help on riding alone or with a buddy is a tough one. You need to be familiar (no, not that familiar) with you wingman, have similar expectations and agendas, have compatible riding skills and pace, equitable resources (including money) and time. Noticed how many ultra distance riders are solo? That said, its obviously far safer and more satisfying to share an adventure like this with a buddy. And surprisingly, having dissimilar bikes is a fairly serious disadvantage, the smaller bike will hold you up on the open road, and disappear through the dust on many of the roads you will encounter on your way south.
    I do hope that it will work out for you - you're in for a treat and a (character building) adventure, without doubt. The people are great, food and lodging a steal, beaurocracy unbelievable, roads very challenging and the geography ever changing. Enjoy!
    Mark

    "Of all the things I've lost, I miss my mind the most" Mark Twain

  11. #26
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmarkr View Post
    Hi Lamble
    How's this for an irony. I'm addicted to coffee. On my recent ride through Central America, if you ordered a cup of coffee, you got frikken Nescafe instant coffee - it drove me mad! So drinking tea does not sound that unique. It may be more challenging drinking coffee - in the center of the coffee growing world.
    To offer any help on riding alone or with a buddy is a tough one. You need to be familiar (no, not that familiar) with you wingman, have similar expectations and agendas, have compatible riding skills and pace, equitable resources (including money) and time. Noticed how many ultra distance riders are solo? That said, its obviously far safer and more satisfying to share an adventure like this with a buddy. And surprisingly, having dissimilar bikes is a fairly serious disadvantage, the smaller bike will hold you up on the open road, and disappear through the dust on many of the roads you will encounter on your way south.
    I do hope that it will work out for you - you're in for a treat and a (character building) adventure, without doubt. The people are great, food and lodging a steal, beaurocracy unbelievable, roads very challenging and the geography ever changing. Enjoy!
    One of the wisest pieces of advice I've read, is travel with more than one, but be prepared to travel as one.
    We have different agendas. We have different bikes. I have yet to determine what our skill levels are, but will insist on a long weekend trip at least.

    I fully expect to have stretches where we ride independently.
    Seems no coffee won't be a hardship though.

    PS. Gordon's Bay and Knysna...favourite places.

  12. #27
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    "... the man who goes alone can start today; but he who travels with another must wait till that other is ready, and it may be a long time before they get off."

    Thoreau said that.

    "First the dream, then the reality."

    I say that.

    Follow your dream and you will never be disappointed in the reality.
    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  13. #28
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    Now I know I'm getting old.

    Tom, my riding companion for this trip said he'd met a girl that wanted to come along.

    There was a presentation from a guy who'd ridden a Ural to TDF, so we went to see it. The girl turned up (I forget her name, but it begins with an M) it was such a short introduction to someone you may end up spending months in very close proximity with.

    She is very attractive in that classical american way. Her friend, who also wants to come was equally as attractive, but has yet to pass her test.

    My first thoughts?

    Damn, how long will they take to get ready in the morning?
    And,
    I bet I'll end up having to play chapperone!

    It is now imperative that we arrange a pre journey ride somewhere, to either confirm, or dispell my preconceptions.

  14. #29
    It is what it is. Bud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamble View Post
    Now I know I'm getting old.

    She is very attractive in that classical american way. Her friend, who also wants to come was equally as attractive, but has yet to pass her test.
    Not sure what "attractive in that classical American way" means.

    I used to post here, but now I don't.

  15. #30
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SIBUD View Post
    Not sure what "attractive in that classical American way" means.

    See that's just pervy.
    You know the USA idea of attractive...California blonde, with a hint of girl next door. Could appear giving the weather report, or in one of those adverts for skin care cream that reduces wrinkles, where a model who isn't old enough to have developed even a dent, yet alone a wrinkle, is used.

    That sort.

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