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Thread: Photo Assignment: Weekend 11/17/07

  1. #121
    Rally Rat Mar's Avatar
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    There are a number of triangles in Elizabeth's face, arm position and hand.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Marilyn Roberts
    F800R, R1150R, R100 Mystic
    Add about 1100 to my post count

  2. #122
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    I'm enjoying this photo assignment thread. I think I am mostly an engineer and I get into things thru the equipment rather than as the end user or artist. I like motorcycles and so I end up riding them. In trains, I like all the remote control. I have 1400 feet of wire under my small layout to control everything, switches, engine, etc., with remote control from one handheld. Most of what I get interested in is thru the instrument and then I try to use it somehow. And of course, as I do, a need is created for some additional feature of the tool. In photography, recently, it was a need for aperture control and some off camera or bounce flash. So that's the why for the D80, 800, and the 18-200 lens. I used to avoid zooms because of the hundreds of resolution tests I had done in the past. This time I decided to throw resolution to the winds and go for the zoom I had always wanted but couldn't tolerate. I figure in many decades, the photos I liked are the ones I took because I could. From where I was to where it was and when it was. If a print was unusually sharp, I usually had to point it out to the viewer anyway.
    So I'm thinking not to get too wrapped up in the technical review on these lenses. I'm trying to fight this urge to read a review and just look at what I see thru the lens.
    BMWMotorcycles, fun when they're running...
    My other bike is a BMW.
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  3. #123
    SNC1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjack View Post
    So I'm thinking not to get too wrapped up in the technical review on these lenses. I'm trying to fight this urge to read a review and just look at what I see thru the lens.
    There's much wisdom in your message, Jack, particularly above. Good on you.

  4. #124
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SNC1923 View Post
    There's much wisdom in your message, Jack, particularly above. Good on you.


    Photography is art and art is about the intersection of form and emotion.
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  5. #125
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    photo assignment

    An acquaintance of mine who takes some of the best photos that I have seen, still uses a couple of ancient metal bodied Pentaxes.

    I have to remind myself of him when I am down at the camera shop looking at the latest and greatest.

    But the powerful new generation digital point and shoots and SLR's do allow duffers like me to shoot a few more quality shots than previously. And you're not worried about wasting miles of film.

    Rinty
    Last edited by rinty; 11-20-2007 at 07:31 PM. Reason: change sentence

  6. #126
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    Here's another I took last weekend;


  7. #127
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    Embarcadero Center, SF?
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  8. #128
    SNC1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by BONEY View Post
    Here's another I took last weekend;

    Triangulus Maximus.

    Check the reflected triangle in the pool at the bottom.

    Nice interpretation.

  9. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBasa View Post
    Embarcadero Center, SF?
    Yep. It's the circular ramp at #4.

    Fun with Google Maps
    Last edited by BONEY; 11-21-2007 at 01:05 AM.

  10. #130
    SNC1923
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    Feedback

    Has it been another week already? Yes, and another one filled with fun, interesting, and inspiring photography. Thanks to everyone who participated, the regulars, the occassional visitors, and especially the first-timers.

    So how did you interpret "Triangle"?



    Rocketman seemed delighted to be first this week and he started us off with a bang. I must confess, I really like this image for several reasons. To begin with, it's a self-portrait and those are always entertaining. After three years on this board, I'm still fascinated by matching names and faces. This is no mere self-portrait. This appears, to me, to be technically challenging and RM pulls it off with characteristic aplomb. Without a doubt, this is an inventive, albeit simple, interpretation. Shot on a P&S camera, the lighting turned out very well. I would have expected the background (face) to be darker or the palms of his hands to be completely blown out. I'm also intrigued by his decision (perhaps subconcious) to splay his fingers. I think it would be far less successful if his fingers were grouped. Statdawg points out that there are triangles in RM's ring, too, beginning a theme this week of "find the triangle." Great fun. 50 bonus points for the unprepentant pun title, "hand-made triangle."



    Cjack is here this week with a new (or newish) camera. I don't actually know how long he's had it, but this photo indicates that it's performing very well. This is a great still-life and a beautiful exposure. It's a bit dark, but that's quibbling and typical of bounced flash (see Bricciphoto's comment on reflectors). It's an image riddled with triangles, one of which surrounds the green light (Great Gatsby? Anyone?) and it is razor sharp. The composition troubles me a little bit, wanting to see more of the train as I do; however, his reasoning is clear as the tower contains so many more triangles. The realism of the scene is impressive, too. Looks like a fun hobby.



    Of his next two submissions, I like Rocketman's first better. The second image does have a human factor, but this is a better form study, IMHO. The wispy clouds work really well with the natural shape of this museum's roof structure. When I first looked at this, I saw a triangle. Only now do I see it composed of numerous triangles. I can't help but wonder what this might have looked like with the use of a polarizing filter--not necessarily better, but it might have added some additional contrast. I might like to trim the bottom of the image, but otherwise it's a great composition, leading as it does to the upper right-hand corner.



    You want triangles? We got triangles! Pglaves is back with an excellent interpretation. This shot is composed perfectly to show the geometric shapes. Nothing distracts from focusing precisely on these forms, an excellent choice for an otherwise mundane subject. This sort of selective vision is part of what makes a good photograph great. The sky is a beautiful blue and I'm so pleased to see the horizon at one-third, rather than one-half, of the image. Nice shot.



    Paul's second shot has already received a number of well-deserved positive comments. Talk about three of a kind. Are these relations or is it some kind of club? Whatever the case, it's an apparently impromptu but very successful portrait. I'm intrigued by the background, some kind of southwest store. It's difficult enough to take a nice picture of one person, but when you can succeed three times, the gods are smiling on you. Six eyes open, three smiles, direct eye-contact with the photographer. . . . I would be remiss if I didn't express admiration for Voni's motorcyling togs. Nice.



    I spent more time on this shot than I think I have on any other for this thread. It struck me one day that this Touratech GS tool might make an interesting subject. It is held up with a clip on a boom and I photographed it using a 50mm micro lens and a tripod. I took 30 or 40 shots and used a polarizing filter for most of them. I was very pleased with this eventual result, preferring to shoot this at an angle rather than head-on. The background, my dying lawn, leaves quite a bit to be desired, especially the inexplicable shadow in the URHC, but the depth-of-field (at F/11!) is pleasing. Minus 500 bonus points for speaking well of your own photograph.



    You know, there's not much to MLS2GO's submission this week. It's brown and it's bland. It does, however, have a discernable subject and it is well composed. 1,000 bonus points for going out and finding a triangle in nature. That's the sort of can-do spirit that makes this country great! Nice job, dude.



    Welcome to AllanCook and what I believe is his first submission. OK, I'm a sucker for in-the-mirror motorcycle shots. And you've got to love that it's an iPhone taking the picture. I struggled for a long time, though, insisting that this picture contained no triangles. Oh sure, there's the capital building, but that's a dome. However, there is the negative shape of the sky-as-triangle. There's also the road surface--both reflected and actual (including the crack)--that form a kind of triangle. I think the vertical composition also works really well. It's a pretty successful image. 65 bonus points for riding an R1200R.



    I especially appreciate Lamble's submission as it was to illustrate his frustration rather than exemplify his success. This is most instructive to those of us trying to improve our technique. It's a great concept. His description reveals that ever-present challenge of trying to combine a series of disparate components00often immovable--into one image. I like the concept, the triangles, and the vivid red of the Union flag.



    It's nice to see RangallIsland back this week, with even more submissions than me. The image above is one of two that really stand out to me. Like MLS2GO, he found natural triangles (yeah, you get 1,000 points, too). It's pretty and inventive. The yellow in the leaves is quite striking. The whole image is a bit backlit, so we lose detail in the tree and the colors lack punch. Compensating the exposure by increasing it by, perhaps 2/3 - 1 EV may have improved this. Wonder what fill-flash may have accomplished. On a sunnier day I may have tried a polarizing filter, but that would have done nothing on this day. I very much like the row of innumerable triangles along the bottom of the frame. It's a cool shot and a successful interpretation of our theme.



    Of the several bridge shots, this is the clear stand-out to me. It's an especially interesting composition (again, vertical composition of a traditionally horizontal subject). I think it grabs me because of it's multiple elements: stone, metal, tree, leaves, and moss. It also has more abstract triangles than one may be able to count. Unlike the other shots, this one seems somehow more solid, more anchored, more purposeful. It's also multi-layered giving it an air of admirable complexity. Several of the other shots have their merits, but this shot has personality and personality goes a long way. . . .



    Boney chimes in this week with not only an interesting interpretation but an important philisophical question about the nature of triangleness. Incappable of addressing the latter, I'll comment on the former. This is a neat image. I love the contrast of the traditional older building (triangles in the roofline) and the high-rise construction crane towering above in the background, itself a triangle. I also like the weird, whispy vapor trail across the sky. It's all a bit muted. I also don't like the dark border on the right. I would like for this to have been a bit closer to the building/crane, but that may not have been possible. Was it taken through a window? That would explain the muted colors. The apparent position of the sun is not helping, either. In spite of all that criticism, this really is a cool shot and much could be done with it in post-processing. A particularly successful interpretation, I think.



    Boney's second submission is a much more successful photo. It's far simpler with an infinitely more mundane subject, but this allows the viewer to concentrate on, rather than struggle to search for, the subject. The colors here are vibrant and sharp and pleasing. Think of how different this would be without the leaves, or if the leaves were green. This is a neat shot.



    Statdawg is back this week with trianlges in nature. I was quite struck by this image when he posted it. Great interpretation, very inventive, and a beautiful winter scene (beautiful to non-riders, I guess). I can see that it is a dismal day and the photo reflects that. Punching the contrast and boosting the exposure in post-processing would go along way toward making this good picture and great photograph. It deserves the help. Again, it may well be the layers in this image that most appeal to me. . . .



    Ok, to begin with, 300 bonus points for Lamble making me crack up at the thought of his swallowing the torch. Just the thought of him harking up a maglight really made me giggle. But of greater importance is what a beautiful image this is that he's taken. Natural triangles (turns out not to be as hard as we thought), interesting textures, bright, vibrant colors, even lighting, and a pleasing composition with additional triangles. This is a very successful interpretation and an admirable still-life.



    I really like Von's composition this week. Her choice makes it such an interesting image with the inclusion of the light in the LLHC. She herself poses the question of how many triangles, and I suppose that depends on the definition of same. I see anywhere beween two and a dozen or more. I again find myself drawn to a simple image, well-composed, and one that reveals numerous textures.



    I love Voni's second submission. This is a funny photograph--it makes me want to chuckle. I love these absurd aluminum tee pees that dot the southwest: hotels, trinket shops, rest rooms. . . . The rolling hills provide a nice contrapuntal element that is pleasing to the eye. Unlike the photographer, and because I was looking for triangles, the one on the back of (Paul's) helmet jumped out at me and made me chuckle. The composition is just a bit tall; I might have lowered the camera given the time and thought. Still, it's a remarkablly successful image. 300 bonus points for having fun.
    Last edited by SNC1923; 11-21-2007 at 05:39 AM.

  11. #131
    SNC1923
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    Feedback II



    Speaking of having fun, Burnzilla returns this week with an image, although contrived, is quite pleasing. This shot makes me think of that most wonderful bit of philosophical dialogue in Pulp Fiction about the merits of eating pork and whether or not a pig is, indeed, a filthy animal. As a still life, this image works well, especially given the decision to include the carton of eggs. This screams "traditional American breakfast" and would be familiar to just about anyone. The foreground appears to be blurred because it's too close for the lens to focus. The background is also a bit blurred, but this appears to be from motion. I might be wrong on both counts, but that's how I see it. The bacon is a bit overexposed, but I love the texture of the reflection in the grease. The floaty bits make me think of gravy. MMmmmm, gravy. . . .



    JMBiii joins us this week with his second-ever post. Good for you, dude, and welcome. I'm not sure that I agree that this is a "poor" submission. I think it succeeds in a number of ways. The idea of shooting spokes had actually occured to me (and I'm sure to others as well) but you were the one to do it. Additionally, the lighting is good, the composition interesting, and the background intriguing. Think of how much less successful this would have been taken in your driveway. Unless of course this is your driveway. Normally, having the foreground (especially one that dominates as this one does) blurry and the background sharp is not good, but here it works to some degree. This is likely due to the interesting texture and lighting of the background. I'm going to assume this was a "mistake." Many of us fail to lock our focus on a point of interest, instead just shooting blindly. This is the result, when the focusing frame (usually small paratheses or a circle in the viewfinder) falls on something that is not the subject, in this case your spokes. Still, it works. I like how the brake rotor and the rim work off of each other, too. Keep posting; you're off to a roaring start.



    Grossjohann is back with another compelling image this week. I was really struck by this image when I saw it. I can't decide which orientation I prefer. I chose the horizontal rather arbitrarily. It's really inventive and I love the depth-of-field. The little guitarist and (monitor?) is just out of focus enough to intrigue the viewer. Only by clicking on the image and linking to your site did I realize that this is a Trivial Pursuit game. Interesting. . . . I assumed they were child's toys and I just couldn't figure out the triangles. It's a really fun and interesting photo. I wish it were brighter and the colors a bit more vibrant. Available light? Always a struggle.



    What kind of a BMW site would we be if someone hadn't shot earles forks in response to a trianlge assignment. 400 bonus points to Rapid_Roy for saving the day. I also struggled with which of the two compositions I preferred. They are both problematic for me, but I chose the first as it included more of the bike and, I thought, may have told more of a story. The framing is too tight to be a bike shot, but too far away from the forks if they are indeed the subject. I would like to see it closer or farther back. You might experiment with cropping the forks vertically. It might have also been interesting to shoot the forks straight on with the cylinder head receding into a blurry background (much like your picture of the week this week). However, I don't know if space allowed any of this. I didn't take this picture, Roy did, and an admirable job he did. I think B&W was a good decision for this subject, too.



    I really admire JohnF's submission this week. I'm a sucker for a bike shot. Plenty of triangles and an interesting composition, especially this angle of the bike. So many of shoot our bikes constantly from the side. One nitpick: the guardrail peeking in from the right. What works so successfully here is the absurdly bright color of the design on the barn and how that leaps out of the photo. Really interesting image.



    MLS2GO's second submission is another interesting one. Talk about a plethora of triangles! This is the sort of close-up composition that lends such interest to an image, especially a still-life such as this. The image would benefit greatly from a boost in contrast. Perhaps a sepia filter in post-processing. Nice find and a cool image.

    Yikes! I've got to go to work. More later. . . .
    Last edited by SNC1923; 11-21-2007 at 05:39 AM.

  12. #132
    Registered User Rapid_Roy's Avatar
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    What kind of a BMW site would we be if someone hadn't shot earles forks in response to a trianlge assignment. 400 bonus points to Rapid_Roy for saving the day. I also struggled with which of the two compositions I preferred. They are both problematic for me, but I chose the first as it included more of the bike and, I thought, may have told more of a story. The framing is too tight to be a bike shot, but too far away from the forks if they are indeed the subject. I would like to see it closer or farther back. You might experiment with cropping the forks vertically. It might have also been interesting to shoot the forks straight on with the cylinder head receding into a blurry background (much like your picture of the week this week). However, I don't know if space allowed any of this. I didn't take this picture, Roy did, and an admirable job he did. I think B&W was a good decision for this subject, too.
    Aiiiieeeeeeee, get out of my head Tom! Amazing, it's like you were there. I did try some other angle shots and you are correct, there was absolutely no room in the garage. The RT was right there, and my sons mini-bike was behind the R50. I was trying for the less obvious triangle of emblem, head and fork, but I see your point.
    A question: If I had shot the forks straight on, how could I have shown the triangle of the forks? I also should have gotten out the tripod but I was pressed for time. I took about 40 shots and 15 or so were blurry. Thank you for your excellent review Tom, and it is great to see all these other truly good shots. It's inspiring.
    19 BMWMOA Nationals under my belt, and I have no idea what I am doing.

  13. #133
    Living in exile Threeteas's Avatar
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    A million bonus points to anyone that can use "contrapuntal" in any paragraph.

    Here's a challenge, see how many times you can use it on Thanks Giving Day.

    It's my word of the week...thanks!

  14. #134
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lamble View Post
    A million bonus points to anyone that can use "contrapuntal" in any paragraph.

    Here's a challenge, see how many times you can use it on Thanks Giving Day.

    It's my word of the week...thanks!
    So I looked around and I love this paragraph...

    "EvanescenceÔÇÖs sound typifies the mush that is an ersatz rock song these days. Since the players can mostly only strum, and because they are contrapuntal cretins, all theyÔÇÖre able to produce is an amorphous blendÔÇöan ill-differentiated, sloppy sonic porridge. This structureless cacophony pleases the lazy ear because it is repetitive, and chock full of blurry, angst-ridden crescendos."
    BMWMotorcycles, fun when they're running...
    My other bike is a BMW.
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  15. #135
    RandallIsland
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    "When we seek a more co-operative order in the design of cities, therefore, we are seeking an order in which more significant kinds of conflict, more complex and intellectually stimulating kinds of disharmony, may take place: in short, we seek a contrapuntal order"(OED).

    Thanks again Tom!

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