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Thread: Charley and Ewan - Canada question

  1. #1
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    Charley and Ewan - Canada question

    Finally ordered the DVD's of [I]The Long Way Around[I] and watched the first four episodes in the last two days. This DVD coupled with the France, Belgium, Holland post and the Irish gent's posting who traveled from the U.S. to South America has me planning for this next summer. The seven states I haven't been to are AK, and HI and NH, RI, VT, MA, and DE.

    So, I'm not yet ambitious enough to head through South America but I'm thinking for riding from Iowa to the NE and tour those five states and then head up through Canada to AK. I've not ventured far into Canada. For those in the know, would the snow be melted on the roads in May or would it be better to wait until June? I'm looking at the google satellite map and some of the mountains on the west could be bad.

    Also, what are some of the must visits in Canada?

    If there are any people from HI on here, you could look at it as I'm saving the best for last.

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

  2. #2
    mrich12000
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    Arrow Ask Paul B.

    Cabot Trail Salty Fog Scallops and lobster





    Last edited by mrich12000; 11-08-2007 at 03:29 PM. Reason: Got hunger

  3. #3
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkasal View Post
    Also, what are some of the must visits in Canada?
    Based on the very little that I've seen so far, and I live here...

    Newfoundland, Labrador and the Trans Labrador Highway if you are planning to do some remote riding in the future. Note: a total of 660 miles of gravel on the TLH.

    A ride up the James Bay Road to Radisson and then over to James Bay.

    Make sure that you have at least 236 miles of fuel range with some reserve on top of that if you head up there.

  4. #4
    floppp
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    Kind of hard to answer your question about snow. It seems that you are talking about riding from the north east states to Alaska. If that is the case you are traveling 5000 miles each way across the continent and over a 1000 miles in a straight line south-north, which is basically the same distance as Dallas to Minneapolis. Things are very different from point to point and day to day. The further north you go, if the snow is gone then the mud will not.

    You would be far better off the plan a route and then use the internet to research historical weather readings than to ask a blanket question about snow.

    The mountains in the west are similar to the mountains in Colorado, Washington, Oregon, heck, half the western states. They are paved in many areas and are subject to unusual weather at anytime of the year.

    It may surprise you that Canada is a lot more like your home than you would think, except for better scenery, cleaner air and, beyond the wildest stretch of the imagination, better beer.

    Let me start you on your research - http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/canada_e.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by Floppp View Post
    Kind of hard to answer your question about snow. It seems that you are talking about riding from the north east states to Alaska. If that is the case you are traveling 5000 miles each way across the continent and over a 1000 miles in a straight line south-north, which is basically the same distance as Dallas to Minneapolis. Things are very different from point to point and day to day. The further north you go, if the snow is gone then the mud will not.

    You would be far better off the plan a route and then use the internet to research historical weather readings than to ask a blanket question about snow.

    The mountains in the west are similar to the mountains in Colorado, Washington, Oregon, heck, half the western states. They are paved in many areas and are subject to unusual weather at anytime of the year.

    It may surprise you that Canada is a lot more like your home than you would think, except for better scenery, cleaner air and, beyond the wildest stretch of the imagination, better beer.

    Let me start you on your research - http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/canada_e.html

    Thanks, all! And yes, I realize we have horrible beer here. The other thing that gets me is beer is supposed to have a head on it when properly poured. Yet, try to put beer in a glass with a head and people thenk they're being ripped off. Think I'm gonna like Canada a lot.

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

  6. #6
    franze
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    The long way Down

    Last week I was in Dublin and bought the book of their latest adventure, The Long Way Down. This time they went from the tip of Scotland to Capetown. Excellent reading. I haven't seen the DVD anywhere. I loved the Long Way Round video. Because of seeing that, I went to that Church of Bones near Prague. Bizarre!!!

  7. #7
    franze
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    Beer Me

    Go to REI and get yourself two clear ceramic pilsner glasses so you can see the beauty of each and every road brew!!! The bottom screws off so you can nest them together and you need two so that you won't be snob if you meet another thirsty traveller

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    Hogaan! testinglogin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Based on the very little that I've seen so far, and I live here...

    Newfoundland, Labrador and the Trans Labrador Highway if you are planning to do some remote riding in the future. Note: a total of 660 miles of gravel on the TLH.

    A ride up the James Bay Road to Radisson and then over to James Bay.

    Make sure that you have at least 236 miles of fuel range with some reserve on top of that if you head up there.
    I second the fuel range suggestions if you're going to head up the JBR - and make sure your bike is in good tune. The JBR is paved, but fairly rough in places. It would be a good time to go up there soon, before they divert the Rupert River for hydroelectric power. If you REALLY want to get remote, you can also ride the Trans-Taiga road; 666km of gravel; after driving up the JBR. VERY, VERY remote. Take fuel with you for that one, and hope that one of the hunting lodges is open to sell you fuel.

    I personally have not ridden the TTR, but now that I have a GSPD I'm tempted to go back...

  9. #9
    Registered User RINTY's Avatar
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    Canada question

    Randy:

    With regard to the west part of the trip, do an advanced search here in trips under "Rockies" and you'll pick up some good routes. If I have time (I'm packing to go to New Orleans for a week) I'll try to find them for you.


    Rinty

  10. #10
    Motorradfahrer
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    Canadian Maritimes....

    Go east from Iowa and do your N-England then head north to N-Scotia, cross to Newfounland, head through Labroador down toward Quebec, all as a prequisite for the later AK trip. Or do the Gaspesie Peninsula(absolutely gorgeous) cross(Ferry) at Matane and head up the James Bay Road for another refresher course for Ak. June/July is a good month to do the Maritimes although a bit wet on occassion and not too cold. May is to early this far north. IF you want to do the southern states do them in May, June, not too hot. June, July, August are cooler far up north.

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    It seems like carrying extra fuel would be a great idea. I'd be taking the K75. What do you all use to carry fuel and how do you mount the extra fuel tank? I picture the red plastic fuel containers but there has to be something better. I'm not keen about potentially being a modern-day Ford Pinto if I'm in an accident.

    Thanks a lot!

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

  12. #12
    Hogaan! testinglogin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rkasal View Post
    It seems like carrying extra fuel would be a great idea. I'd be taking the K75. What do you all use to carry fuel and how do you mount the extra fuel tank? I picture the red plastic fuel containers but there has to be something better. I'm not keen about potentially being a modern-day Ford Pinto if I'm in an accident.

    Thanks a lot!

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal
    Actually, I DID use one of those red plastic fuel containers. The original plan was to get it the day I headed into the remote section, and then leave it at a gas station (with permission) after I left. I ended up keeping the gas can, though. It worked out pretty well. I DID have an issue with some spillage; I wasn't familiar with it, and didn't extend the neck all the way when pouring. Aside from that, I didn't even notice it on the bike, and it didn't leak or anything. BTW: IF you head up the James Bay Road, prepare yourself for all weather. I was there 3 days after the MOA rally (July) and it was unseasonable cold (even for up there). I got hailed on, and also rained on. One day it rained and was 39 degrees around noon. Rather shocking, to say the least. I packed plenty of gear, so it worked out. Riding for a few hours in that weather without having proper gear would have been deadly.

    Photo of bike with gas can:
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Tires/wheels and other equipment

    Quote Originally Posted by GlobalRider View Post
    Based on the very little that I've seen so far, and I live here...

    Newfoundland, Labrador and the Trans Labrador Highway if you are planning to do some remote riding in the future. Note: a total of 660 miles of gravel on the TLH.

    A ride up the James Bay Road to Radisson and then over to James Bay.

    Make sure that you have at least 236 miles of fuel range with some reserve on top of that if you head up there.
    I like that James Bay Road web site and the Trans Labrador highway sounds interesting. I think it a good idea to carry along a spare front and rear tire and it now seems knobbies are imperative due to the gravel. My question is, should I just have a spare set of wheels mounted to the spare knobby tires? That would be simpler particularly if there is bad weather, bad people, or bad bears to quickly get back on the road.

    While on the subject of bad bears and bad people. I assume a reasonable length knife, say six to seven inches and bear spray is ok to carry? And a hatchet?

    Besides carrying water, fuel, water purifying tablets and equipment as a back-up, camping equipment, food, tools, tire inflator, etc., what am I missing that I should carry?

    Yeah, I know it's a long ways off but planning makes the trip smoother. There will be enough suprises anyway.

    Thanks a lot everyone!

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdmetzger View Post
    Actually, I DID use one of those red plastic fuel containers. The original plan was to get it the day I headed into the remote section, and then leave it at a gas station (with permission) after I left. I ended up keeping the gas can, though. It worked out pretty well. I DID have an issue with some spillage; I wasn't familiar with it, and didn't extend the neck all the way when pouring. Aside from that, I didn't even notice it on the bike, and it didn't leak or anything. BTW: IF you head up the James Bay Road, prepare yourself for all weather. I was there 3 days after the MOA rally (July) and it was unseasonable cold (even for up there). I got hailed on, and also rained on. One day it rained and was 39 degrees around noon. Rather shocking, to say the least. I packed plenty of gear, so it worked out. Riding for a few hours in that weather without having proper gear would have been deadly.

    Photo of bike with gas can:
    Josh,

    Is that snow or hail? Thanks for steering me back to the plastic fuel container. It'll be ok and lighter weight.

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

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    Oil changes, maintenance

    Several other thoughts occur. Google maps for a route from Des Moines, Iowa to Quebec to Anchorage, AK back to Des Moines, Iowa is about 9,308 miles. That's three oil changes at 3,000 miles each.

    Yes, I can change the oil but I do like the idea of having the bike in a shop so that there is another set of eyes on the bike for any potential issues that I don't see. I would probably plan on carrying enough filters for the trip and two liters of oil.

    What else should I be thinking of (taking the K75 - it needs some miles) while on the road for such a trip? Clutch/brake levers and cables routed alongside the original cables are one thought.

    Any other ideas for all you long distance milers would be great.

    Thanks in advance!

    Regards,


    Randy Kasal

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