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Thread: Photo Assignment: Weekend 10/27/07

  1. #76
    sMiling Voni's Avatar
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    It has indeed!

    And M1ka, in his Morning Reads today give us this:

    http://digital-photography-school.co...l-photography/

    More basics that I needed to hear. What a supportive place to learn this thread is!!

    Thanks Tom, and ALL of you.

    Voni
    sMiling
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  2. #77
    SNC1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by Voni View Post
    It has indeed!

    And M1ka, in his Morning Reads today give us this:

    http://digital-photography-school.co...l-photography/

    More basics that I needed to hear. What a supportive place to learn this thread is!!

    Thanks Tom, and ALL of you.

    Voni
    sMiling
    Voni,

    You are most welcome! And I echo your thanks--everyone's participation is what makes this so enjoyable and interesting.

    I saw M1ka's link for "beginners," and thought it was good advice for lots of photographers. He also has been running links to these threads, too. Much appreciated.

    I would be remiss were I not to give a shout out (I have no idea what that means) to Kbasa who got this whole thing rolling.

    What fun!


  3. #78
    RandallIsland
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    Quote Originally Posted by SNC1923 View Post
    I would be remiss were I not to give a shout out (I have no idea what that means) to Kbasa who got this whole thing rolling.

    What fun!

    Poobah Poobah Poobah Poobah
    Poobah Poobah Poobah Poobah
    Poobah Poobah Poobah Poobah

  4. #79
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    If there's one thing I know how to do, it's steal an idea and run with it.

    Big props to Tom for keeping it going.

    Do we want to have a larger "review and comment" team?
    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

  5. #80
    SNC1923
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    Feedback Time

    I'm impressed with how many people seem to be reading what I have to say about the photo submissions. I'm one of many experienced voices on this board. I enjoy this process and the exercise of having to think critically and make substantive comments on your artistic interpretations. I only hope I do your efforts and intentions justice.

    As has already been pointed out, this has been a banner week. I'll comment on at least one photo from each submitter. If I don't comment on a photo you'd like to hear about, repost or PM me.

    Like many of you, I've really enjoyed this week's results. Let's get to it, shall we?

    This week's theme was "wide open." Shooters were asked to interpret this how they may, and--if they desired--to play with the depth-of-field (DoF) on their cameras.



    This week's first submission is from Rapid_Roy. This shot addresses the theme both technically and aesthetically. It is, indeed, shot with a wide-open aperature, as the very limited DoF will attest to. But it's also a large opening, one crucially important to a motorcyclist. This appears to be an airhead, and one can just make out the right cylinder head in the distance. I almost want that in slightly sharper relief, making it evident that this is a motorcycle, and indeed, a BMW motorcycle. Of course the stamping on the muffler does indicate that. It's sharp, clear, and well-composed. Notice that it conforms to the "Golden Mean" of composition. I even like the reflection in the chrome. Really nice job here.



    Statdawg's with us again this week with a really interesting interpretation. It's a beautiful landscape shot through this. . . . what is it? The opening obviously focuses one's attention, but at the same time, the diffusing of the image through what I assume is plastic really captures the imagination. It's almost as though I'm viewing a reflection the concentric circles of a recent splash in the water. There are two images; I chose this one which I liked better. Both are shots of merit though. The difference seems to be the degree to which the lens is zoomed, this one being wide-angle and the other more telephoto, but I'm guessing.

    I recently took a photo like this while in Colorado through a Slurpee lid. It was a fun effect, but this is executed much better. Maybe he'll tell us what this is all about, or maybe not. . . . Nevertheless, really imaginative and thought-provoking rendering of an otherwise standard landscape shot.



    KBasa joins us this week with three nice shots, each of which addresses the theme in terms of technique and interpretation. Of the three good shots, I like this one the best. The yellow flower is equally beautiful, but less interesting to me because of the dominance of one color--a subjective impression to be sure. This subject is indeed wide open, a flower in full bloom. the depth of field is quite shallow; as you can see, even the petals foreground and background recede into blur. The subject--the pistil--is in sharp focus and the DoF draws the viewer's eye right to it. The background looks busy, but is sufficiently blurred so as not to distract. It's a well-executed and pretty photograph.



    OK, I lied. Here's KBasa's yellow flower. Also a really nice shot, and one that offers an alternate angle, head-on rather than from the side. Arguablly a more flattering angle for the subject. There's a bothersome little shadow at the bottom. What detracts from this photo--slightly--in comparsion to the other is that the DoF is less shallow and the background distracts a bit from the subject. This is magnified by the subject's blank, yellow pallate. Something really interesting in this image, and one that would be less visible in a more colorful flower, is the pistil's shadow.



    Another Rapid_Roy shot. I like this because it's a creative interpretation of the theme and an unusual angle for a bike shot. He wants us to look at the seat, and his composition directs us to do that. He comments that he couldn't get the DoF shallow enough to eliminate the background. This is probably due to the fact that the shot is wide-angle. Because the magnification is reduced, the DoF remains fairly deep inspite of a large aperature.



    Honorable mention for another unusual angle. It's easy to take a shot of a bike on its side stand; how many of think of unusual angles like these two? 600 bonus points for creativity--200 each for these three shots.



    There is so much to like about Voni's submission that I hardly know where to begin. As KBasa points out, this is an open door welcoming riders, or seemingly so. Fits the theme wonderfully. There are screens or something on the windows, so they are darker than the door's entrance. Again, the viewer's eye is directed to the subject. That the door is red is serendipitous, but makes for a wonderful detail. I like that the bikes are partially obscured and that the riders are in sharp relief. I like how the light falls off as the photo recedes to the right. It's just a wonderful, interesting, and thought-provoking image. Voni's got an eye for this.



    Snoone's back with a nice image this week. Of his two submissions, I think this one fits the theme better. Although typically wider angle works better for a landscape photo, here the telephoto shot reveals more detail and tells more of a story. In the wide-angle shot, the hamlet disappears into the background. The telephoto shot includes the trees and the wonderful autumn colors, but still tells a story about where this is and what the surrounding area includes. If you page back (page 2) and look at the wide-angle shot, the foreground isn't that interesting. In this shot, the foreground is the beautiful trees. Really nice shot.



    Beerteam's back with another batch of really nice submissions. This first one really jumps out to me as a creative interpretation of the theme. It says a lot about HDs, too. It captures the culture and the vibe associated with these bikes well. You may note (for those trying to learn) that the DoF is not too shallow. The image does become softer in the background but only slight so, again attributable to the use of a wide-angle lens, I'd guess.

    I'm envious of this private museum tour. Several really nice shots.



    Crow18 brings us two nice submissions this week. His first? I don't recall seeing others. This is an especially nice shot for a number of reasons. To begin with, it is wide-angle but because he's so close to the subject and the aperature is wide open, he does achieve a shallow DoF--no mean feat. In addition, the composition layers nicely into the rule of thirds with little more than color, from blue to green to shadow. It's a complex and interesting image with the various blues of the flower, the vivid green leaves, with the dead needles lying on each. It appears to be purposely under-exposed, bringing out the richness in the colors. This is a photo of not only a plant but of a forest atmosphere.



    Sonnata joins us with a nice image this week. Fits the theme nicely and is a great exposure. The latitude of light in this image exceeds the sensor's ability to record, so decisions must be made. The camera's meter (or the photographer) made good decisions here. The foreground is dark and the background blown-out, but the tunnel entrance, the subject as I see it--has the proper exposure. It connotes mystery and perhaps a little danger. I like the barely-visible grafitti on the left. This shot is somehow just a bit sinister. Maybe it's the dead leaves. Maybe I'm just looking for trouble. It's a nice shot. 100 bonus points for not putting the tunnel entrance dead center in the image.



    I like RandallIsland's submission this week. It addresses the theme with an unexpected vertical composition. The bridge wants to be the subject, but it isn't. The clouds and the opening that reveals them is the interesting aspect of this shot. There's a vague (purple?) cast to the shot that somehow adds to the whole. It's interesting and invites contemplation.



    Gil visited the Pittsburgh Zoo this weekend and caputered a shot that fits the theme quite well. Imagine being a veterinary dentist facing this patient. I'm sure he's just yawning, but these shots are always impressive and are usually the result of at least a little patience. It is a bit fuzzy. Low resolution or motion blur? My eyes just ain't what they used to be.



    Darcym joins us this week with several nice submissions, two of which I'd like to comment on. This first is another nice flower shot with limited DoF. It appears to have been shot in glaring, direct sunlight and so is a bit washed out; however, the inclusion of both the entire pistil and its entire shadow is a really nice composition. Fits the theme well.



    Darcym's other submission is an exquisite close-up of an unsual (to me) insect. Never seen a red one, in my yard or elsewhere. The DoF is entirely obscured--this is close-up, telephoto, AND wide-open. The dragonfly is in sharp focus though. Really, really nice. The wings are so interesting. It's great lighting, too. My one fault here would be the composition; I'd rather see the dragonfly higher in the frame. Having said that, it may not have been possible and timing may also have been a factor. In post-processing this can be cropped, too. A really successful image.



    Tourunigo is back with several nice images. The well is interesting, but this one gets my vote. It's a very successful landscape and an equally successful boat shot. Everything is right about this composition. The horizon's slightly out of whack, but I've beat that horse to death already. I like the character of this little boat and wish that the red boat in the river weren't obscured by the pier. The sky's a bit washed out, but it's very visible in the water, which is perhaps more interesting. Really pretty picture.



    This shot is also worth mentioning. Nice exposure and color. It's a relatively mundane subject, but it's so artfully executed that it makes for an interesting interpretation. It's a very thoughtful composition. Nice.



    PGlaves, having received this week's memo, is back with a nice submission. Fits the theme well and is an interesting, well-composed shot. The exposure on the tractor's opening is right-on, but the rest of the image is a bit over-exposed. This is a RED tractor--I want to see that. I think this could potentially be fixed in processing.



    MLS2GO is back with two nice submissions. This one is impossible to resist. I love everything about this. That the kids are wearing helmets (and this has nothing to do with ATGATT, though he does collect 500 bonus points) but that they are play-acting, what kids do so well. The little boy's wide open mouth fits the theme beautifully and reveals his unbridled joy to be on this magnificent motorcycle. What fun! It's lit with a flash (fill-flash) and that adds a sense of excitement or urgency to the photo. Really, really nice stuff.

  6. #81
    SNC1923
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    Feeback Time II



    JohnF, who apparently has a pretty wry sense of humor, is back again with a nice submission. An interesting old building with a bike included, always good. But that it's a dental museum, open wide, well. . . . You see where he's going. Nice.



    BMWDean joins us again this week with three submissions of merit. The shot above is simply hilarious. It addresses the theme perfectly and it's just plain funny. Deryle's teeth have a lot of character and I would recommend that he seek work as a tooth model. 500 bonus points (100 each) for the gold crowns--have two myself. My dentist doesn't get it, but I dig 'em.



    Another neat, super wideangle shot from BMWDean--motorcycle related, to boot. There is noticeable barrel distortion in this image and severe fall off in the corners. Is this a lens attachment or a lens? In spite of technical imperfections--which do add drama--this is a powerful and exciting shot. Reminds me a bit of a Sport Illustrated shot in a football stadium.



    This is a really interesting close-up. It's an F800 engine cut-away or K1200? I remember something like this from last year's show. This is a great angle, nice lighting, just very successsful. Thinking about DoF, the foreground is a bit blurry and the background is not. This is due to where to point of focus (where the AF was pointed) is centered. Nothing serious, just an observation. I generally prefer the foreground focused and the background trailing off. Takes away nothing from this successful effort.



    Here's one of mine. Brilliant but flawed. Seriously, I like this shot because it's unusual in that it records a mundane and rarely photogrphed occurance. It's an opening (though hardly wide) and so attempts to address the theme. The shallow DofF really draws attention to the obvious character in Kelly's working-man's hands.

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    Franze from Switzerland--18 posts--comes in this week with this diminuitive submission. Doesn't really fit the theme that I can see. Also, toooooooo small! But a nice image from a ride and welcome submission from a newer member. "Camera set to idiot." A sense of humor always helps. Post again and thanks for joining us!



    Grossjohann is back with a number of submissions this week. The above fails to address the theme and is a fun if ordinary photo. But it garners 10,000 bonus points for including an R1200GSA. Nice.



    GJ's second submission is an excellent composition, addresses the theme well, is an excellent example of shallow DoF, and is really, really gross. (50 bonus points)



    This should be cropped and displayed. As GJ already asks, what are the odds of capturing a flash in your exposure. A flash's durantion is in the tens-of-thousands of a second range. I'm not a statistician, but those have to be long odds. Neat image.



    CJack joins us this week with a photo from his other expensive hobby. This is a nice product shot, for lack of a better description. It's a clear image with good color, too. The shadows from the flash are a bit of a bummer, but that can be relieved with a simple and inexpensive reflector. They even make them for SLR cameras with built-in flashes. If I can pick on just one other small thing, if the DoF were just a bit greater, the trains would be in focus, too. The point of focus seems to be on the drawbridge and leaves the trains a bit fuzzy. With all that said, it's a pretty successful effort and looks like a lot of fun. I'll never know because if I came home with model train stuff, my wife would kill me and bury me in the backyard.



    Nice to have lamble join us this week, though I miss his old avatar. This is a successful shot that addresses the theme through technique, namely DoF. An otherwise ordinary shot of leaves has so much "punch" because they are set in stark relief to the fuzzy background. A nice shot.



    Of the two bridge shots, I like this one better. The angle (from below) adds a sense of drama to the image and the vertical composition is unexpected. We actually have two vertically-composed bridge shots this week--although if we include Deryle's bridge, that's three. I kill me.



    How very nice to have Sue Rihn-Manke join us this week with this idyllic sunrise. Sunsets are commonplace subjects, sunrises far less so. This is a beautiful shot that definitely tells a story. I'm not sure if I see revealing an interpretation of the theme (though I could just be a dunderhead) but I don't care--it's a great shot. The inclusion of the tea set (which is actually full of coffee) is splendid. I'm sorry that you missed the steam of the coffee. How great would that have been. The whole shot is a bit undersaturated due to the difficulty of shooting into the sun, but post-processing might help that. Beautiful photo.



    Happy to see Burnzilla back this week with a couple of beautiful submissions. This one is gorgeous. This photo is all about light and I can't say enough nice things about it. The texture in the water is magnificent and the overall cast of maroon is just great. This is more like an oil painting than a photograph. The color, light, and texture completely overshadow its ordinary composition. I love this shot.



    JDMetzger is back with what may be this week's most unusual submission. He kind of beats this shot up, but I really like it. Very unusual subject and a bold composition, angle of attack. I agree that the vanishing point does sort of prematurely vanish. . . . I wonder if lifting the camera, pointing it down slightly, may have helped? 350 bonus points for creativity. Whereas we like to see the subject off center, rule of thirds, golden mean, and all of that, this shot's absolute and rigid symmetry is what makes is so compelling. This is a shot worth returning to and experimenting with. It's already quite successful. Who knows how it might evolve with further efforts?



    This is a bitchin' picture. Fit the theme? I don't know, but I like it a lot. I love the color and that the bike is in partial sillhouette. It's an iconic image, one that would appeal especially to BMW afficianados, but to others as well, I'm guessing. Love the exposure, the twilight in the bottome. I might crop out the goobers in the lower margin, though. Minus 10 points for goobers.



    Bricciphoto has already said much of what needs to be said about this fine photo. I really like this. It reminds me, a bit, of the recent shot by Outback UFO. It's no copy, of course, but just a similar study in lines and contrast. Nice submission and a successful effort if I may say. I particularly like the shadowplay on the terrestrial. 100 bonus points for adding "terrestrial" to my vocabulary and 50 bonus points for going to church.

    Barring any last-minute submission amidst all the trick or treating, that's all folks. It was a banner week and really nice crop of photos. We've all been thanking each other for our submissions and work, but I would like to add my sincere thanks to everyone who participates and makes this so fun, photographers, critics, and viewers.

    Next week's theme will be up in a day or so. Watch for it!
    Last edited by SNC1923; 11-01-2007 at 05:39 PM.

  7. #82
    BMW MOA co-founder bmwdean's Avatar
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    nother neat, super wideangle shot from BMWDean--motorcycle related, to boot. There is noticeable barrel distortion in this image and severe fall off in the corners. Is this a lens attachment or a lens?
    'Twas a fisheye lens. All three were fisheyes. Ergo, distortions.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  8. #83
    K Bikes Complex by Choice cjack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SNC1923 View Post
    CJack joins us this week with a photo from his other expensive hobby. This is a nice product shot, for lack of a better description. It's a clear image with good color, too. The shadows from the flash are a bit of a bummer, but that can be relieved with a simple and inexpensive reflector. They even make them for SLR cameras with built-in flashes. If I can pick on just one other small thing, if the DoF were just a bit greater, the trains would be in focus, too. The point of focus seems to be on the drawbridge and leaves the trains a bit fuzzy. With all that said, it's a pretty successful effort and looks like a lot of fun. I'll never know because if I came home with model train stuff, my wife would kill me and bury me in the backyard.
    Speaking of expensive hobbies, after taking this while fiddling with the Coolpix camera, I suggested I reactivate my other hobby of decades ago and get a Nikon D44x or maybe a D80. She didn't say she would bury me in the back yard, but did suggest that I sleep on it.
    BMWMotorcycles, fun when they're running...
    My other bike is a BMW.
    Jack Hawley MOA and RA #224, KE9UW ("Chuck")

  9. #84
    Hogaan! testinglogin's Avatar
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    Woo! I did better than I thought!

    Thanks for the constructive feedback as always, Tom!!! Really appreciate you doing this; it sure is a lot of work with all the submissions!

  10. #85
    SNC1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwdean View Post
    'Twas a fisheye lens. All three were fisheyes. Ergo, distortions.
    Clearly a very nice lens, Jeff. Are you using a crop sensor camera? Or is it a legit 10.5mm? Either way, a very nice lens.

    All three shots were great, but that middle one seemed to have so much fall off. Maybe it was just the light. . . . I'm shooting Canon lately, but I've used Nikkor glass for many years. Great stuff.

  11. #86
    Ambassador BeerTeam's Avatar
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    Great photos.

    By looking at this weeks submissions, I am seeing a lot of nice DSLR with some fancy lenses. It would be great to see the camera info while judging the photo. Having that info would be great for our next camera purchase.

    I am shooting with a CanonA 610 and a four year old Canon S70 Point and shoot. The S70 is an advanced P&S. If I were to replace the A610 I would look into purchasing a G9 or a S5 IS.

    I would go to a entry level DSL but I like a camera in my pocket not at home on the shelf.


    Looking at this weeks photos, the old story of it is the person behind the camera only goes so far.

  12. #87
    grossjohann
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    Thanks for taking so much time to address out submissions, Tom. This is such a great project. I hope we can keep it up.

    IÔÇÖm not sure that IÔÇÖm qualified to help with the reviews, but IÔÇÖm here if you like. Otherwise, I will try to help by submitting only one image each week.

    LetÔÇÖs see if we can keep this up!

  13. #88
    grossjohann
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeerTeam View Post
    Great photos.

    By looking at this weeks submissions, I am seeing a lot of nice DSLR with some fancy lenses. It would be great to see the camera info while judging the photo. Having that info would be great for our next camera purchase.

    I am shooting with a CanonA 610 and a four year old Canon S70 Point and shoot. The S70 is an advanced P&S. If I were to replace the A610 I would look into purchasing a G9 or a S5 IS.

    I would go to a entry level DSL but I like a camera in my pocket not at home on the shelf.


    Looking at this weeks photos, the old story of it is the person behind the camera only goes so far.
    I held out for years before replacing my Nikon Rebel with a DSLR. The Cannon looked great, but I just wasnÔÇÖt ready to go with the Cannon lens (this was about 4 years ago). I'm using a Nikon D70 (6 megapixels) with a Nikkor AF 35-70 (F 2.8) lens, and for the "keep it in your pocket all the time" camera, I use a Sony Cyber-shot (DSC-W100) 8.1 megapixels with a Carl Zeiss 3x optical zoom.

  14. #89
    grossjohann
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    Quote Originally Posted by bmwdean View Post
    'Twas a fisheye lens. All three were fisheyes. Ergo, distortions.
    I love the fish-eye lens, but I have a hard time justifying the expense I suppose if I had one, then I would have more ideas that require it

  15. #90
    R12ST bricciphoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BeerTeam View Post
    I would go to a entry level DSL but I like a camera in my pocket not at home on the shelf.

    Looking at this weeks photos, the old story of it is the person behind the camera only goes so far.
    I just sold all my hi-end DSLR gear in July and bought my wife an F800ST and me a Canon G9. I've had all the gear (fisheye to 300mm, tilt/shift lenses, strobes and doohickeys galore) and there are some technical limitations equipment overcomes, but a photo is really all about the subject, the composition and the exposure. If you can't master those three variables, all the equipment in the world isn't going to help. Many of my favorite photos were snapped with an old Canon G2--including some that were technically extremely complex. A skilled photographer with a basic camera can outshoot a less skilled, but well-equipped photographer any day of the week. All that said there are some inherent disadvantages (of equal magnitude) to both simple P&S cameras and DSLRs. I want to challenge myself to reach new technical and creative levels, and I no longer shoot professionally, so I simplified my gear (of course starting with the knowledge of what I can and can't do with a G9 helps).
    Ben Ricci

    Rides & Drives: '07 BMW F800ST Low, '07 Porsche Cayman, '06 VW Jetta TDI & '05 BMW R1200ST

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