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Thread: Photo Assignment: Weekend 10/06/07

  1. #31
    @ the Big Muddy & I-80 bluestune's Avatar
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    Building

    Quote Originally Posted by Voni View Post
    Blue sky day.
    Building a treehouse with Dad.
    Hammer. Nail.
    Blue boy.
    Black and blue thumb.

    Voni
    sMiling
    Voni: I like the intimate, comforting moment you captured between Dad and Son. The outdoors setting, the hammer and boxes of nails (I think) seem to tell the story of building something together. I also like the tilt of the camera; it tells me something is not quite right.

    What I suggest as a second shot (as if this scene could ever be set up again) would be to move the camera to the right or just turn to the right and move in or zoom in just a little closer, keeping the items on the far left side of the photo out of the frame and seeing all of the hammer, but still keeping Son and Dad as the center of interest. A little flash fill would bring out more detail and you would see more of the expressions of the two subjects, but by adding flash to this scene it might ruin a real special mood. Good shot.
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  2. #32
    REBECCAV
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    Quote Originally Posted by OUTBACKUFO View Post
    TinCup, Colorado Town Hall....

    was stormy in Aspen area just 35 miles north over the the mountains... but everwhere else it sas just windy and cold but clear....




    all images shot with nikon D70 28-70 mm lens with an f11 appature...
    I really love this shot by OUTBACKUFO. It is so simple and elegant. The clouds reflected in the windows are delightful.

    There are some really great pictures this week and beerteam hasn't even weighed in yet!!

    RE Captions/Photo descriptions: I think that some photos need captions. For me, I need captions in magazine or news photos because often there is so much behind the photo that I need to know to appreciate it. Those sort of pictures leave me with so many more questions than answers.

    However, in this context, I would rather have the image stand on it's own and have it be judged on it's own merits. I think that a viewer brings so much of himself to a photograph and sees it through the lens of his or her own experience and that is part of the process for me. If I told you what I was thinking or feeling when I made the image in some ways I think that it would detract from it.

  3. #33
    Registered User grossjohann's Avatar
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    Gray Day, Blue Sweats, Home Cooking

    Other obligations hampered this week’s project for me, but we did manage to grab some candid snap-shots. No award winners, just snippets of daily life:

    Last edited by grossjohann; 01-20-2008 at 04:07 AM. Reason: Image lost when thread moved to Photography Forum

  4. #34
    Registered User grossjohann's Avatar
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    Blue Eyes, Loose Tooth

    Last edited by grossjohann; 01-20-2008 at 04:06 AM. Reason: Image lost when thread moved to Photography Forum

  5. #35
    Sl??*inte mhath! sonnata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxergrrlie View Post
    I really love this shot by OUTBACKUFO. It is so simple and elegant. The clouds reflected in the windows are delightful.

    There are some really great pictures this week and beerteam hasn't even weighed in yet!!

    RE Captions/Photo descriptions: I think that some photos need captions. For me, I need captions in magazine or news photos because often there is so much behind the photo that I need to know to appreciate it. Those sort of pictures leave me with so many more questions than answers.

    However, in this context, I would rather have the image stand on it's own and have it be judged on it's own merits. I think that a viewer brings so much of himself to a photograph and sees it through the lens of his or her own experience and that is part of the process for me. If I told you what I was thinking or feeling when I made the image in some ways I think that it would detract from it.
    boxergrrlie makes some very good points. I'm usually not thinking of anything other than trying to get the shot when I take a photo. And I certainly don't expect others to see what I see. Heck, when I see the finished shot it's always different from what I see in the viewfinder anyway. Maybe that shows my lack of expertise with a camera, but that's my experience.

    I especially like reading the comments from others on the photos. For example I really liked this shot as well, but didn't even notice the clouds until she pointed them out. Now I like it even more.
    Kevin Moyer
    06 K1200LT

  6. #36
    Registered User grossjohann's Avatar
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    Blue Turns to Gold...

    Last edited by grossjohann; 01-20-2008 at 04:06 AM. Reason: Image lost when thread moved to Photography Forum

  7. #37
    @ the Big Muddy & I-80 bluestune's Avatar
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    Lamp and shadow

    This lantern was sitting on a ledge next to the stairs running downstairs. There was a little light from an open doorway at the top (exercise area) and the only other light (now) was from a bare bulb (probably 60watt incandescent).[/QUOTE]


    Hi Josh, good eye, this photo has lots of appeal. The curve of the glass chimney, the long shadow on the wall, the small splash of blue reflection and the hard cold stone the lamp is sitting on all help to illustrate the story you told. What might make this an even stronger image would be to shoot horizontal and get closer to the lamp and shadow. By eliminating some of the blank space on the top and bottom and emphasizing the shadow you would create even more mood in an already good shot.
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  8. #38
    @ the Big Muddy & I-80 bluestune's Avatar
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    Bluebird

    Hi Dave, IÔÇÖm one of those people who really appreciates motion (blur) in a photo, it can add an extra dimension of life to a scene. Motion in a photograph is also one of those things thatÔÇÖs very subjective.

    YouÔÇÖve captured this birdÔÇÖs energy, speed and agility. The background is perfectly out of focus and has great color and texture while youÔÇÖve kept the center of interest in the right-hand third of the frame. As a suggestion on composition I would try to be a bit closer or, if you can, use a slightly longer lens.

    In reading between your lines I sense that you would have liked this image to be sharper, if you have a digital SLR you might try bumping up your ISO setting to get more stop action capability. The downside to raising the cameras ISO settings is getting more noise in the image. Or. try using a slower shutter speed for even more blur.

    Many wildlife photogs spend big money on long and fast lenses. They also spend a great deal of time studying the habits of their subjects and then more time waiting for ÔÇ£the shot.ÔÇØ I really admire the determination and perseverance of that breed of photographers. Thanks for posting the photo.
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  9. #39
    @ the Big Muddy & I-80 bluestune's Avatar
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    Blue Lick Road

    Hi John, IÔÇÖll choose this one to comment on just because I enjoy ridding roads like this. I like the light filtering through the trees and the overall feel of a great day of ridding on a beautiful country back-road. The exposure is right on, the color is subtle but saturated and the horizon is on the bottom third of the image. And, you stopped to take the time to shoot this, good job.

    Option one would be to climb the bank of the road just to the left of the image and get a higher camera angle having the road sweep from the upper left to the lower right giving you a read dynamic line running through the photo. Option two would be to climb the bank further down the road and have the curve in the road wind through the shot. Hopefully the scenery around the bend in the road is as beautiful as it is presented here. Thanks for posting the photos.
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  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by boxergrrlie View Post
    .

    There are some really great pictures this week and beerteam hasn't even weighed in yet!!
    I had a nice 24 hour, 400 mile and almost 400 click (lots of editing) Autumn ride on Wisconsin back roads. The ride went to two cool Wisconsin events, the Airhead Rally at Wildcat Mountain and the Slimey Crud Run.

    Tonight I will try to figure out which of the 49 keeper photos to post. All photo are to the theme "blue" as I was riding my blue Airhead GS and had blue skies all the ride.


    Blue Photos

  11. #41
    @ the Big Muddy & I-80 bluestune's Avatar
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    Blue Pinnacle

    Quote Originally Posted by SNC1923 View Post


    Dome over the capitol rotunda in Sacramento California, Friday night. I was attending a conference there and desperately trying to find something to fit the theme. I was determined to not go with color, but found this theme of my own choosing to be a greater challenge than I had expected.

    Note to self: avoid nouns.

    EXIF embedded, just click on the image.
    Hi Tom, nouns are a challenge, they stretch our creative capacities. OK time for your commentary. The angle you chose to capture the inside of the dome works well, it allows us to see the depth and height of the dome yet delivers a very artful presentation of this interior, theres a golden mean application in use here. Exposure is spot on, the shadows at the bottom of the dome have just enough light to show some of the ceiling structure, then the gradual increase in light levels as we ascend to the top of the dome finally reaching the blue pinnacle (thats the blue theme, right?)

    So what would I do differently? To add even more interest having a person stand near the rail in the lower left or lower right would be one option. Another possibility would be to move the camera a bit more to the right, placing the blue pinnacle the in the top right portion of the frame along with the person standing by the rail, reading the constitution, wearing a white wig, dressed in clothing from the 1800s .. Really the photo is very good just the way it is, thanks for playing along
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  12. #42
    SNC1923
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    Quote Originally Posted by bluestune View Post
    [SNIP]Another possibility would be to move the camera a bit more to the right, placing the blue pinnacle the in the top right portion of the frame along with the person standing by the rail, reading the constitution, wearing a white wig, dressed in clothing from the 1800s ..[/SNIP]

  13. #43
    SNC1923
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    Photo Commentary

    Another great group of images this week. People really stepped up to the bar with what turned out to be a somewhat challenging theme, "blue." I've enjoyed reading the comments of others on some of these fine photos. Let me add a bit of my own.



    First up this week is Voni's entry. Bluestune has already made some insightful comments on this wonderful photo. This image is filled with charm and emotion. I especially liked the inclusion of a short poem to explicate its blueness. Perhaps the most important thing to say about this photo is that she had the presence of mind to grab her camera and snap the picture. It's really a neat image.



    Statdawg's image is certainly a compelling one this week. A noose (as we've learned from recent news events) is a powerful symbol, charged with all manner of negative meanings. For that reason alone this image packs a wallop. I like the way it's composed and that it looks down on the chairs. I'm sorry he edited out his narrative. I had put off reading it and now don't know what it said. I believe he did point out that the chairs are not "period." I do wonder how much more powerful the shot may have been if only one noose had been included. Maybe not. What is someone had been sitting in the chairs? It looks like a snapshot taken from a limited position; nevertheless, it certainly draws the eye.



    Again, Bluestune has cogently stated everything that needs to be said about jmetzger's great image. I'm really just putting it up here again because it's worth looking at again. I didn't take it, but I like the idea that it might have been composed horizontally. Josh may have composed it this way for a reason. Either way it works, a beautiful and simple still life. I am particularly struck by how the line of the shelf and the line of the shadow converge rather than run in parallel. Sometimes the simplest images are the most interesting.



    This is the second of JohnF's two entries. As a counterpoint to the critique offered on his other shot, I'd like to make a few suggestions on how this shot might be even more successful. It's a good shot, but not a terribly interesting subject (it is, as he points out, the BLUE highway!). Stepping up on the bank might have made it more interesting, eliminating the shadow on the right. The vanishing point (where the road curves) is almost dead-center in the image. Just recomposing to place that elsewhere in the image may have added interest. Still another possibility would be to hang out for a few minutes to see if a bike wandered by. Having a motorcycle going down or up the road might have added a sense of drama to the shot. Still, it's a nice capture of some beautiful country.



    There's a lot to like about bmwdean's submission this week. It's a mundane subject, but one of great interest to we beemophiles. It's a great perspective--and of course, as Jeff has told us, it's a shot of his odometer. But the composition includes the headlight and its brackets. I also really like how the various lines and cables curve out of the shot. Everything is wonderfully--though not perfectly--symmetrical, which matches nicely the 30,000 readout. Nice shot.



    A newer poster, sonnata brings us this shot of his Bouvier, Lena. This is a pretty pedestrian picture, the kind all of us take around the house or at the family picnic. But I see here a picture that will be cherished in years to come, of the beloved pet in a typical pose. Another thing to like about this is the inclusion of the ON magazine. Whether accidental or on purpose, it provides a potentially humorous counterpoint that's always enjoyable and illustrative. Fun picture. Good girl.



    Boxergrrlie gives us another cool image this week. Her posts strike me as "thoughtful" images, whatever that means. More than anything, this--to me--is a picture of light. The lighting is the most interesting aspect of this striking image. It's a great example of "latitude," or the range of exposure that can be captured on a given image. In the old days, different films were rated as having different latitudes: 3 stops, 5 stops, even 7 stops from the lightest light to the darkest dark. Rebecca's image exceeds the camera's latitude here. The highlight is lost in the lamp and the detail disappears into the shadows. It's an extreme range of exposure. She could have exposed for the light, but lost all the shadow detail. She could have also exposed for the shadow of the porch illumination, but the light would have appeared like a sun-spot. Her, or the camera's, decision on the exposure is the right comprimise. It's a moody, thought-provoking shot.



    Bluestune stopped working long enough this week to grace us with two very worthy images. I love this one. It's also a moody light shot. It's a very interesting image, with the shadow, the highlights, the shadow detail. The composition--the space occupied by the bike--is just right. It leaves plenty of room for the wonderful spoked-shadow. The background color ranging from blue to orange is really effective, too. It's more like a painting than a photo. What fun can be had by simply playing with a garage work lamp. Really, really nice image.



    I don't know if I even want to say anything about Bluestune's other shot. Just look at it.

    OK, I'll say that Bradford Benn ought to take a look at this for a foundation card. Don't know if it fits their theme (might be a bit somber for a holiday card) but it really is a neat shot. It's just a fender, but the water, reflecting the light 1,000 times, really tells a wonderful story. Washing the bike? Getting out of the rain? It's a remarkably artistic rendering of the most mundane of subjects: a fender. Wonderful stuff.



    I'm very pleased to see outbackufo join us this week. I enjoy his work very much. What needs to be said about this image has already been said. Very simple subject and composition resulting in a beautiful and artistic image. I particularly like the stark rigidity of the absolutely parallel lines. The reflection of the clouds in the window is brilliant and makes this really good image great.



    I actually had a kind of physical reaction to this image. I could feel myself shivering on the side of a cold, wet road as traffic roared by. What I like best about this shot is that it takes an "error," the reflected motorcycle light resulting in lens flare and turns it into an artistic component of the image. Really striking shot. I don't know if this was purposeful or happenstance (I suspect the former) but it really works. The trailing automobile headlights resulting from a slow exposure provide a nice counterpoint.



    grossjohann provides another great family shot. This is an image that will likely endure in the family album. That the photographer dares to get so close is what makes this memorable. I also like that this is of a child playing with a loose tooth (as they all do) rather than of a gapped-tooth smile. Think of how many of the latter you've seen. Very few of the former. Anyway, fun shot.



    I'd like to offer a few comments about one of grossjohann's other submissions. First, I like how it fits the theme. It's a thoughtful photograph as well. "Why is the chair empty?" one might ask. The exposure range is great. It appears as though the chair is flash-lit and matches well (not perfectly) the sunset exposure. And like the picture of his wife in the kitchen, the subject is slightly out of focus. The autofocusing cameras allow one to lock the focus on the intended subject, especially if that subject is not in the center of the image. This is usually accomplished by pointing the camera at the subject, depressing the shutter release half-way, recomposing the image, then firing. Play around with this. It will change the way you take pictures.

    Again I'd like to say what a great group of shots we had this week. Still time to turn some in. What are you waiting for? What, do you have to work or something? Look for next week's photo assignment tomorrow or early Friday.

  14. #44
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    AboveRight 180 degree sweeper
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    I know I did not follow the rules of one photo per post, but I look at this as one scene. The picture is coming down from Wildcat Mountain State park in Western Wisconsin. I am on my way to breakfast, three hours after sunrise.

    I may have to do a re-take on the top photo, as I just noticed a beer can a few feet behind my rear tire. I normally pick up garbage that would be in the photo.

  15. #45
    Focused kbasa's Avatar
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    I really like this one, Santa.

    Dave Swider
    Marin County, CA

    Some bikes. Some with motors, some without.

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