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Thread: Connecting Gerbings

  1. #16
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
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    My dealer said to put a 10 or 15 amp in ther if you want. A guy came in with the same problem last year while I was there. My bike has a 15 amp fuse in it.

    those are Lemmings by the way Cliffy, Your Dookiness
    Gale Smith
    2009 Versys
    1999 R1100RT

  2. #17
    Luckies
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    HereÔÇÖs the problem. The manual is WRONG. The wiring diagram shows a 15 amp fuse in that slot, the wiring diagram in my Clymers does anyway. I have been running a Union Ridge suit, gloves, socks, and a 2610 off the accessory plug all winter without problem. That is, until one day the suit wouldnÔÇÖt heat up and my windshield wouldnÔÇÖt move either. I checked the fuse, saw it was a 15 amp, and just to be sure, verified that it was the correct fuse in the manual, but what I found was that it called out the 4 amp fuse. I put one in, plugged in the suit and blew it out instantly. Okay, something really wrong with the suit here, I get out my meter and found good continuity all around. Hmmm, now off to get may Clymers manual. Sure enough, itÔÇÖs a 15 amp so I put a 15 back in, get on, take off, and by the corner the windshield wonÔÇÖt work again, turn around and head back to the garage. Fuse is blown again. Now you smart trouble-shooters will already be saying to yourselves ÔÇ£He didnÔÇÖt fix anything in the first place, why would he think just changing a fuse would fix anythingÔÇØ. Of course it doesnÔÇÖt! So IÔÇÖm back to trying to figure out what the heck is wrong. The fuse only blows after I plug my suit in and doesnÔÇÖt always pop immediately. Gotta be the suit. Back to verify continuity, itÔÇÖs still good. What the hell. I unplug the suit from the bike and for some reason I decide to see if the accessory plug is hot, it is, and leaves a small red dot on my fingers for good measure. I open up the BMW accessory plug that Gerbings provided with my suit and find this, (picture below). As you can see the connection lugs are just close enough to arc after the suit starts to draw more current. I called Gerbings and immediately got an apology, over and over, really, they were what I felt, genuinely sorry to have caused me an inconvenience. Anyway, they sent a new one out right away and I havenÔÇÖt had a problem. I did notice that they have changed their manufacturing process on the accessory plug. The first was potted with an RTV substance that could be seen coming out of the back of the plug and the second had a pre-manufactured seal that looked like it was on the wire to begin with. So look at the plug, could be the problem. Hope this helps.

    Dave
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  3. #18
    USERNAME
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    i would like to say that thanks to this thread, when my glove liners and jacket liner arrived yesterday from gerbing, i just yanked the gas tank, wired directly to the battery, (and hard-wired the GPS while i was in there) neatly dressed the wires, and whammo spiffo, everything is good. without having read this prior (and spoken with brad) i'd have likely tried to use the accesory socket and smoked a few fuses before just hard wiring.

    so much thanks to brad for starting this thread, to everyone who replied, and to advrider's hall of wisdom where i obtained excellent instructions for removing the tank, etc etc.

  4. #19
    Right Wing Conspirator Grey_Matter's Avatar
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    This is very good info. I hard wired my Heat-Troller to the battery & ran the jacket plug out from the front of the seat. This is very convenient & I have not had any problems with this set-up. The GS has a second accessory outlet on the left side of the beak. So far I have only used it for a 12v LED light I use for night time, road-side repairs.

  5. #20
    . AntonLargiader's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradfordBenn
    I did the math with 77W and 12V and it indicates that the fuse must be rated at approximately 6.5Amps
    First off, the bike runs at 14V. I think the Gerbing draws in the neighborhood of 95W.

    On my RS, it took a 25A fuse to keep two of us hot on a cross-country trip. My passenger had the jacket, gloves and socks. I had just the jacket I think, maybe gloves, and the heated grips running (I forget if they are on the same fuse). No damage to any wiring.
    Anton Largiader 72724
    largiader.com bmwra.org

  6. #21
    dgardel
    Guest
    The problem is the "electronic modulation (via peak waves)" and not the power absorvation.

    The Gerbing electronic modulator doesn't "comunicate" with the R1200GS electronic fuses circuit.

    SO it's necessary to add an extra fused plug to use the vest.

    Ciao

    Daniele
    R1200GS

    Quote Originally Posted by BradfordBenn
    Hello All-

    I figure I am not the first one to hit this little problem...

    The Gerbing directions say:



    Today the snow and rain stopped enough to go for a ride. I read the directions on the ÔÇ£Portable Temp-ControllerÔÇØ and followed the instruction to have engine running when connecting. Went for a ride around the neighborhood and noticed I was not getting warm. The LED was not blinking on the controller. I went back home and checked the fuse for the accesory socket as the GPS had also lost power. The accesory socket fuse had blown, it is rated for 4Amps. I figured maybe I had done something wrong, and replaced it once again following the directions. Go for a test ride again and still no heat. After doing some troubleshooting, I determine that the root case is OhmÔÇÖs Law.

    OhmÔÇÖs Law states that Power (or Watts) divided by Electromagnetic Force (Volts) = Intensity (Amps). I did the math with 77W and 12V and it indicates that the fuse must be rated at approximately 6.5Amps or more than 50% larger. I checked my ownerÔÇÖs manual for my R1150RT and it does indicate that the accesory socket has a 4Amp fuse.

    So at the moment I am still cold. However the legs were nice and warm with the HyperTex Overpants.

    Anyone else hit this problem? Is the only solution to wire it into the battery?

    I figure that if the BMW vest draws 70W it must have a similiar problem.

  7. #22
    Dang! RatSnake's Avatar
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    The "wire to battery" harness from Gerbing comes with a 15A fuse installed. That handles jacket liner pants liner, socks and glove liners through a Heattroler for me.
    RatSnake
    Dennis Murphy
    Third Lake, IL
    2013 R1200GS BMWMOA, IBMWR, AMA Rounder #43

  8. #23
    Alps Adventurer GlobalRider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradfordBenn
    Anyone else hit this problem? Is the only solution to wire it into the battery?
    Well it isn't the only solution, but this is what has worked for me.

    I wanted a single solution to "charging", "voltage monitoring" and "power" so I wired in a YUASA Battery Analyzer directly to the battery and replaced the 3A fuse with a 10A fuse...yes, the wire can more than handle it.

    Now at the press of a button I can verify if my battery voltage is above or below 12.5V, or I can connect my YUASA Hot Shot 12V, 900 mA charger/maintainer (good for all types of batteries) or I can connect my heated vest...all to one outlet.

    The battery analyzer connector is an SAE connector. My Heat-Troller has the same connector and I used a SAE coiled cord between the two.

    I use 3M marine Velcro to attach the YUASA battery analyzer to the air filter housing when not in use.

  9. #24
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    need opinions

    I need some opinions on this. Today I put my vest on for the first time and rode my bike to Indiana, Pa and back. About 65 miles round trip. Outside temp was about 30 degrees most of the time. I don't have a T-stat just an on/off switch. For the first 8 to 10 miles I didn't feel any heat but I wasn't cold. Then I had to stop at a red light and I felt the heat quite well. From there I was behind slow moving traffic for a while and was very warm. When I was able to ride at 65 to 70 again I felt no heat from the vest. When I arrived back home I wasn't cold but I was happy to get into the house.

    Do you think my vest is shutting down. If so why would it restart. It can't be a blown fuse or it wouldn't work at all. Any and all ideas are welcome.

    If I get a chance I'll try it again tomorrow but they are talking snow showers here.

  10. #25
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    It helps in really cold weather (<40) to have some insulation and wind barrier over the heated vest/jacket. At speeds the heat can dissipate quickly. It also helps to have little between your body and the vest. A long sleeve tee shirt works well.

    Actually, at speed with the higher rpm's, you are probably producing more heat. It just goes away faster.
    Frank G.
    Hattiesburg, Mississippi
    2004 R1150RT

  11. #26
    leave my monkey alone LORAZEPAM's Avatar
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    making sure the vest is not too loose will help too. If it pulls away from your body, it cant transfer heat very well. I also agree that wearing your insulating layer over the vest will make it warmer.
    Gale Smith
    2009 Versys
    1999 R1100RT

  12. #27
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    opinions

    Thanks for the replies. I did wear the vest over top of my sweat shirt. As I said it was my first time. Next time I will wear a t shirt then vest then sweat shirt and jacket. I'll let you know if that makes a difference.

    Thanks

  13. #28
    Slowpoke & Proud of It! BRADFORDBENN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by screamin eagle
    Thanks for the replies. I did wear the vest over top of my sweat shirt. As I said it was my first time. Next time I will wear a t shirt then vest then sweat shirt and jacket. I'll let you know if that makes a difference.

    Thanks
    I wear a long sleeve t shirt under the Gerbing and that seems to work well. It also helps to distribute the heat. Then a fleece or a sweatshirt over the Gerbing.
    -=Brad

    It isn't what you ride, it is if you ride

  14. #29
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    gerbing vest

    Pay attention now: It isn't often that I plead guilty to being really stupid. Just plain stupid yes, but not really stupid. Here it is. The day I rode to Indiana, I guess because of stupidity I didn't push the plug far enough into the port. Sooo the plug came out while I was riding and dragged along the roadway, causing abrasive wear on the tip. I realized the situation soon after occurrance and thought that no damage had resulted (wrong).

    That brings me to the next time that I used the vest. I plugged it into the port but no light on my on/off switch. I thought the fuse had blown but after twisting and pushing on the plug the light came on. Great. vest is working. NO, as soon as I let go of the plug light goes out. Long story made short, if I pushed on the plug it would work but not on its own. Soooo, I just need to replace the end for another $15 bucks I can make it work.

    Case closed

    Thanks for your help, opinons, and attention.

    Class dismissed

    Billy

  15. #30
    I'm a Village Idiot MAGWA's Avatar
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    All the books are wrong......

    I recently had a wiring issue (my grandkids say, "if you have an issue, get a tissue") on the R1150RS. I was wiring the Valentine and Roady2 through a relay and grabbed the wrong wires.

    Result: Blown fuse. I was working with the high and low beam leads. So I went to the book to see where that circuit was fused. The book showed no fuses for the headlights.

    So, before asking the list for help, I looked at all the fuses. Strange little 4A's that I'd never seen before. They all looked good, though.

    Great help on this list told me that I was going to have to be better at diagnosing than I am....so off to the dealer. Turns out there was a blown fuse that my *eyes* couldn't detect. They use an ohm meter to test whether or not the fuses are blown, since they have seen some that look good that have miniscule breaks in them.

    Also, the manuals that they have been given by BMW do not show the fuses in the correct places for the correct circuits. They had to go on line to a proprietary site to download a proper diagram. Not in color...in German....and not denoted clearly. They had to trace the wiring *on the diagram*.

    On a "separate-butt-equal" process, I had one of these goodies from Centech in the garage that I had purchased after seeing the ad in MOAN. I must'a had a buck or two burning a hole in my pocket.

    Easy mount by placing it under the rubber battery retaining strap of the battery after hooking up some big + and - wires.

    Thanks to all for the "juice load" info. I'll wire the Gerbing's liner heat-troller to the Centech (Google it if ya want to). Here's what they say and a little picture:

    The AP-1's compact size (3.0ÔÇØ x 2.4ÔÇØ x 1.25ÔÇØ) allows for easy installation. Once mounted, your positive and negative wire is attached between the power source (battery or relay) and the heavy power studs which will then allow the AP-1 to supply safe, fused power for up to eight individual electronic devices, including radio, GPS and other accessories up to 60 amperes.
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